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Once a Belle, always a Belle

first_imgThe crowd that filed quietly into Regina Chapel on Tuesday filled the room with green – they wore bright green shirts and pinned small green ribbon to their tops. They came to remember Saint Mary’s sophomore Ziqi Zhang. Zhang, 19, who died last week from injuries sustained in an accident between her bike and an SUV outside the entrance to the College on State Route 933. Green was her favorite color. But even as they filled the chapel with green, they also filled the room with stories. During the service, faculty, staff and students from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s stood one after another and shared their memories of an international student who had been their friend. A resident of Regina Hall, Zhang was a dual-degree student majoring in mathematics at Saint Mary’s and taking engineering classes at Notre Dame. She was a resident of Jiangsu Province in China. International student Ariane Umutoni met Zhang shortly after the two arrived at Saint Mary’s. She remembered Zhang as fearless while they discovered America together. “I remember going to the beach with her in Michigan,” Umutoni said. “There were big stones. … She was like, ‘I want a picture there.’ I said, ‘That’s dangerous,’ and she said, ‘Let’s take a chance.’ I was so scared, but she wasn’t. “That was Ziqi.” Umotoni asked the Saint Mary’s community to come together as a family during a time of need and grief. “We need you,” she said. “Some of us are far from home. You cannot imagine how my family is feeling to know that they have not seen me in so long and such a thing can happen. We need each and every one here. “We’ll hold hands, mourn together, cry together, share memories and just be a family,” she said. The stories from Zhang’s friends prompted both tears and laughter during the service. Paige Edmonds was Zhang’s resident assistant during her freshman year. She joked about a resident she said was both curious and warm. “She was one of those freshman that the questions you think you’re never gonna get asked as an RA, she asked them,” Edmonds said. “She was the type of resident who when you had a section event, would come knock on my door the next day and ask where everyone was. But she definitely challenged me to grow as a person. … Remember her smile.” Saint Mary’s graduate Chen Chen recalled a story she heard about Zhang before the two had even met. A mutual friend brought Zhang to pick up the keys to her dorm room on her first day at Saint Mary’s, but when they went to open the door, they had some trouble with the lock. “Ziqi just whipped out a toolkit … and started seriously working on trying to break into her room,” Chen said. “So I got really excited, and the first thing that came to my mind, I got to tell this story to Dr. Barstis, who is the engineering advisor, to let her know that we have a student who has the right engineering spirit. … That’s basically how she got to the engineering program.” Other professors and friends recalled Zhang as constantly smiling and always willing to push her limits for new experiences. They talked about an excellent student newly fascinated by philosophy and dedicated to her studies. They remembered a girl excited to return home to China over winter break for the first time since she had left for college. Notre Dame sophomore Christine Nie said she came from the same city as Zhang in China, but only met her after they came to South Bend. She remembered feeling at home hearing Zhang speak their first language with the same distinct accent as her family members and friends in China. “I thought even though she couldn’t stay in this beautiful world, as a girl of the same age and of the same city and of similar background, I can live this life for her,” she said through tears. Elaine Meyer-Lee, director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL), read an email from Zhang’s parents to Dr. Alice Yang, director for global education. Another Chinese-speaking professor had translated the letter. “We lost our precious daughter,” they wrote. “She was our pride and joy. She longed for this wonder country of America, and we wish that she could have completed her studies, learned the sciences and humanities so that she could have played a worthy role in the betterment of the entire human race.” College President Carol Ann Mooney also wore bright green as she addressed the crowd gathered in the chapel. “Each of us has lost a sister,” Mooney said. “It is terribly difficult to lose a young person with so much talent and so much promise. Ziqi’s death leaves a hole in the Saint Mary’s community.” Zhang’s family is working to obtain passports and visas to come to the United States, Mooney said. Donations to help the family with funeral and travel expenses may be sent to Karen Johnson, vice president of Student Affairs, in 175 Le Mans Hall. Checks should be payable to Saint Mary’s College and indicate in the memo line that the donation is for the Ziqi Zhang family. “For her family, this is an unspeakable grief. … Our hearts break for her parents, her sister and her good friends and family in China,” Mooney said. Student Affairs is also collecting notes for Zhang’s family at the same address. The notes will be translated and delivered to her family when they arrive in the United States. “When they arrive on our campus, we will make every effort to let them know how valued Ziqi was, what a positive contribution to Saint Mary’s she was and that she had a home here.”last_img read more

Gallery: Syracuse falls in final seconds to Notre Dame, 51-49

first_imgSyracuse (12-4, 1-2 Atlantic Coast) struggled from the field in its 51-49 loss to Notre Dame (13–3, 3–0) but the Fighting Irish shot the ball at a lower clip. It was 21 offensive rebounds by UND that made the difference in the defensive battle, including a Rex Pflueger putback on Notre Dame’s final offensive board of the game with just over two seconds remaining. Here are the best images from SU’s loss on Saturday. Comments Published on January 6, 2018 at 8:47 pm Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Long live the DraftKings of Europe

first_img Mateusz Juroszek – Non-stop STS will expand amid industry disruptions August 12, 2020 Submit StumbleUpon Share Related Articles Alberto Alfieri: Leading the way for Gamingtec’s B2C growth August 25, 2020 MoneyMatrix boosts wire transfer options by integrating Klarna’s Sofort August 24, 2020 DraftKings recently became one of the first DFS operators to secure a Maltese Controlled Skill Gaming licence. Jeffrey Haas, DraftKingsIt didn’t take long for the company to reveal its European plans for 2017 either with a German launch planned for Q1. The operator entered the UK space around a year ago and the mega merger with FanDuel is expected to be fully done and dusted midway through this year. For now expansion in Europe is on the cards is the talk of the town.DraftKings’ Chief International Officer Jeffrey Haas was appointed to lead the DFS operator’s European expansion which began in the UK last year. The former Poker Stars and bwin.party man spoke to Totally Gaming this week about their ambitions for 2017.On why the company opted to start with Germany Haas said: “Football is obviously part of the DNA in Germany. We know this, as there are already millions of season long fantasy football players on popular platforms owned by sports leagues and media companies. Even the Bundesliga launched their own manager games product this season, for the first time.“That said, while Germany has a very strong sports culture with football at its core, American sports including the NFL and NBA are also extremely popular.”DraftKings offers a greater range of sports than the majority of DFS B2C operators. It has also fared better in the UK to date than many may have expected. Haas notes that there has been a 20% month on month growth in the first nine months of operation, and this has been achieved without excessive marketing campaigns.The operator established some club partnerships early on but it’s been nothing like the all out assault on TV screens and at sporting events that was seen in the DraftKings FanDuel war in the States in 2015. When discussing the future of DFS many point to Latin America as a region in which it could be hugely successful. When asked whether DraftKings may move into this territory, Haas stated: “We already see DFS growing in Brazil with Escala11, and in Mexico with ChalkDFS.“Both seem to be doing a great job of creating awareness and excitement in our category. We will get to LATAM in time, but literally have a world of opportunity to choose from. Right now, we are focused on bringing our games to Europe. It’s an exciting time to be in our space, and I love the competition! It’s great for consumers to have so much choice, and good for us as it puts pressure on us to both excel and continue innovating.” Sharelast_img read more