first_imgDAY6 is for everybody It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Last year, the USOC honored Tommie Smith and John Carlos, whose raised-fist salute during “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the 1968 Olympics stands as one of the seminal moments in sports protests.National anthems are played at the Olympics to honor the winners of events.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogUSOC CEO Scott Blackmun said: “Our stance on this is fairly clear, and we recognize the rights of athletes to express themselves.” Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Forgotten man: Derrick Favors ready to bounce back with Jazz Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene How to help the Taal evacueescenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson MOST READ Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Michael Phelps, center, carries the US flag during the opening ceremonies of the 2016 Rio Olympics in Brazil. APPARK CITY, Utah — The leader of the American Olympic movement says the U.S. Olympic Committee recognizes the right of athletes to express themselves at the Games, even though Olympic rules forbid political protests.The comments came Monday, in the wake of shows of solidarity among NFL players who were angered by President Donald Trump’s stance on kneeling during the national anthem.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share Photo: Courtesy of LSC-TomballLone Star College-Tomball Vice President of Instruction Dr. Quentin Wright (left) welcomes attendees to the first of several immigration workshops being hosted by Lone Star College this week.The travel restrictions issued by President Donald Trump at the end of January have been blocked by the courts. But they have brought up many questions.Additionally, the Trump Administration is toughening deportation guidelines through measures such as the removal of undocumented immigrants who have been in the United States for at least two years.That is a change from the Obama Presidency, which focused more on those newly or recently arrived in the country.In the midst of all this, Lone Star College (LSC) is trying to help clarify the situation by holding free immigration workshops in all its campuses this week.According to LSC’s administrative office, more than 3,000 foreign students are currently enrolled in the college and nine of them are from countries impacted by the travel ban.LSC leaders say they have received many questions from foreign students.Alicia Harvey-Smith, the college’s executive vice chancellor, notes the goal of the workshops is broad because “it’s not simply limited to our international students, but anyone who might have an interest and I’m pretty sure we will probably have some community members showing up and who may also have questions.”Sarah Monty is Houston-based an immigration lawyer who participated in the workshop held on Monday, February 20th.Monty told Houston Public Media “there is a lot of nervousness for all foreigners,” and added they “tried to address different points of anxiety” in the workshop.Among other reasons for the anxiety, Monty underscores the uncertainty of foreign students in general, but also the repercussions of the ongoing immigration actions by the Trump Administration.EDITOR’S NOTE: This story has been changed from an earlier version to accurately reflect the actions taken by federal judges in the ongoing litigation over President Trump’s executive order on travel from seven Muslim countries. Listen 00:00 /01:01 Xlast_img read more