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SBU Prof. Named First Andrew Carnegie Fellow from a Long Island College

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Stony Brook University professor was the first educator from a college on Long Island to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow when he won the prestigious fellowship this week.Jared Farmer, an environmental historian and award-winning adjunct professor of history, plans to use the $200,000 award to complete a creative non-fiction book on the human relationship with long-lived trees and our larger relationship with nature in a time of climate change.“I am bringing together the history of trees and the science of longevity to contemplate the ethics and politics of long-term thinking in the Anthropocene,” said Farmer. “I’m a historian by training, but this new project includes aspects of science writing as well as creative writing.”Farmer is one of 35 fellows recognized by the program, which aims to support emerging humanities scholars that are working to strengthen the US democracy, drive creativity, explore global connections and improve environments. The program launched in 2015 and each fellow publishes a book or major study.The professor, who earned his PhD in history from Stanford University, previously authored three books, including the award-winning On Zion’s Mount: Mormons, Indians, and the American Landscape. He began teaching at Stony Brook a decade ago.“Climate change is not only the policy problem of our time; it is also a problem of time,” Farmer said. “It requires thinking and caring in the long term—beyond the moment, the individual, and the species. I think it’s important to find historical precedents for long-term stewardship of the more-than-human world. To the extent possible in 2017, I want to write a hopeful book—one that shows the shared solicitudes of science, religion, and the humanities.”last_img read more

McShane hails Phelan’s impact

first_img The club’s longest-serving player appeared to be heading for a January exit after being sent to train with the Under-21s by Bruce for undisclosed disciplinary reasons, but relations have thawed and McShane has ousted Curtis Davies from the side. He admits he expected to leave and is delighted to be back in favour. “Football, it’s mad, it’s a crazy game sometimes,” he said. “I thought I’d played my last game for Hull. I was prepared to leave in the transfer window. “But I didn’t want to go, no way, it felt wrong to think about going, and now it’s great to be back playing, especially in a couple of good games with some big results.” The flipside of Hull’s renewed optimism is starkly evident at Villa, who dropped into the bottom three after finding no response to goals from Nikica Jelavic and full debutant Dame N’Doye. Villa are winless in 10 league outings and have scored just once in their last eight. They turned in a timid display at the KC Stadium and were warned by boss Paul Lambert afterwards that they were now playing for their top-flight careers. Right-back Alan Hutton is hoping that descending into the drop zone can jolt the squad to life. “It’s very difficult to take, Hull was a big game for us so to be beaten 2-0 is hard,” the Scot told Press Association Sport. “You’re always aware of the table and maybe slipping into the bottom three is the kick in the backside we need. “We have been playing well but not getting results and we need to change that quickly. “We all know we have to do our bit to get the goals, it’s a team game and we’ll take that on the chin as a team. “There’s pressure on every game now because we need to get going.” Press Association Phelan began work as Steve Bruce’s right-hand man just a week ago but his arrival has coincided with an immediate upturn in form for the Tigers. Having spent the majority of his coaching career hunting silverware alongside Sir Alex Ferguson at Manchester United, Hull’s relegation battle represented unfamiliar territory for Phelan. But he has thrown himself into the task and the initial results, a surprise 1-1 draw at Manchester City at the weekend followed by Tuesday’s crucial 2-0 win over Aston Villa, have helped Hull climb out of the bottom three. And Phelan’s early impact has not gone unnoticed among the players. “Mike’s been really good already, we’ve just been saying in the dressing room he’s going to win the first assistant manager of the month!” defender Paul McShane told Press Association Sport. “He’s done very well, the sessions we’ve had with him have been really good. “He’s brought something new and different to the group and training has been intense. “It’s been tough but the lads are really putting it all in during training and that’s showing out on the pitch. “It’s been a great few days because if we didn’t back up what we did at City it would have been a waste. But we’ve built on that result and got the three points at home.” McShane’s return to action has been another common theme in Hull’s last two performances. Hull’s players have an ointed newly-arrived Mike Phelan as the Barclays Premier League’s first “assistant manager of the month”. last_img read more

Day of Long Knives as Maigari Battles Pinnick for the Soul…

first_imgDuro IkhazuagbeFinally, the battle for the soul of Nigerian football will be decided Thursday in Katsina as incumbent Amaju Melvin Pinnick guns for a second term in office as president of the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF). Others in the race include, immediate past president, Aminu Maigari, a former General Secretary, Taiwo Ogunjobi and a dark horse amateur club proprietor, Chinedu Okoye.Pinnick is aiming to break a jinx that has lasted over 50 years as none of the past presidents has ever succeeded in returning to office back-to-back. The former Delta FA chairman is banking on his achievements during his first term to swing victory in his favour. But football historians in the country know that winning the NFF presidency goes beyond performance in office. Extraneous factors bothering on the usual Nigerian ways of doing things take the lion share in who gets elected. Ordinarily, Pinnick’s performance in this first spell ending today is enough to get him an automatic ticket for an encore on the job. Apart from raising the profile of the federation with multi-billion Naira sponsorship partnerships, he has succeeded in putting NFF on the path to self-sustainability! Instead of the previous beggarly disposition of the NFF, now, Nigerians are beginning to see semblance of corporate governance in the running of the affairs of the Glass house. And only a second term can consolidate all the gains recorded in the past four yearsBut Maigari whose secondary education certificate is under scrutiny going into today’s polls at the Kabir Aliyu Maska Conference Hall in Katsina, is a time-tested gladiator of the Nigerian football politics.After high-wired conspiracy stopped him from getting re-elected shortly after the World Cup in Brazil where Super Eagles matched the country’s previous best achievement of a second-round finish, the Bauchi-born football administrator is banking on the structure he has been oiling since 2010 when he succeeded Sani Lulu Abdullahi to reclaim his mandate from Pinnick. He is also banking heavily on the previous block votes that come from the northern delegates who speak with one voice.However, Maigari’s permutation may have been punctured by the young Turks led by Shehu Dikko, an alley of Pinnick and Ibrahim Gusau who are both gunning to return to the board as both 2nd Vice President and Chairman of Chairmen respectively. Dikko also doubles as chairman of the League Management Company (LMC). They both know their return to these two plum positions are tied to Pinnick’s fate today. Gusau has oil and gas magnate, Ifeanyi Ubah to contend with for the chairman of chairmen position.As at last night, wheeling and dealings amongst the combatants stretched late into the night with the various camps crossing the ‘ts’ and dotting the ‘is’.For the position of the 1st Vice President, two candidates from the South-west are at each others throats. Incumbent Lagos FA Chairman, Seyi Akinwunmi is aiming for return while a former member of the Pinnick camp, Otunba Sunday Dele-Ajayi wants the same position. Unless something gives in the last minute horse-trading that dove-tailed into today’s polls, the Lagos FA boss is as good as returned to the position.An interesting scenario is also expected to play out in which candidate represents the South-east in the new board. While Chairman of Enyimba, Felix Anyasi-Agwu is plotting his return, Vice-chairman of Imo FA Emmanuel Ochiagha is insisting it is the turn of Imo to represent the zone on the NFF board. Another candidate from Abia, Emeka Inyama is likely to step down.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Doc Rivers says Clippers can’t become ‘intoxicated’ with one win over Spurs

first_imgGame 2 is at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Staples Center.What Rivers said may be true. The bottom line is, the Clippers came up with one of their most impressive victories of the season. When their 18-point lead was cut to nine with less than eight minutes to play, many probably figured the Spurs would get even closer.They never did. The Clippers came out of a timeout and went on a 7-0 run, eventually leading by as many as 20 points.Yet, Rivers wouldn’t say it was his team’s best effort of the season. “I really don’t think so,” he said. “I kind of said it after the game last night that I liked that we won the game. But I felt frustrated during the game, a lot, with the way we were playing. I thought we were playing hard and that might have been the hardest we’ve played. “But we can be a smarter basketball team for sure on both ends. We missed a lot of shots, but so did they and I think that theirs are the ones that probably frustrated me the most because some of them — they were just really good missed shots — but some of them we just broke our coverage under the disguise of playing hard. We have that saying — hard and smart is better than just hard.”The Spurs shot just 36.6 percent, and while some of that was solid defense, some of it was shots that went in-and-out.“I think we can play better,” Rivers said. “I think we’re going to have to, if you want to be honest. We can’t count on the missing wide-open 3s.”Monitoring minutesThere has been a lot of talk about the Clippers not having the best of benches outside of sixth man Jamal Crawford. The shooting guard scored 17 points Sunday, but only two other reserves scored for a combined five points.Among the starting five, Blake Griffin played nearly 43 minutes, DeAndre Jordan more than 38 and Chris Paul just under 38. The Spurs, with 43 points from six reserves, got a team-high 33 minutes from starting forward Kawhi Leonard.Rivers was queried as to whether he is concerned about his starters becoming fatigued if this is a long series.“No, we’ve been doing it all year,” Rivers said. “It’s not like it’s the one time. In the playoffs, you get days off. It’s nothing like the regular season. I mean, we get two days off on this one and it’s every other day, so I don’t think minutes are going to be a concern at all.”Griffin averaged 35.2 minutes during the season, Paul 34.8 and Jordan 34.4.Crawford smiling bigCrawford couldn’t stop smiling in the locker room after Sunday’s victory. He shot 7 of 10 from the field — 3 of 4 from 3-point range. That’s an enormous improvement from the 10-for-36 (27.7 percent) shooting clip he had put up in the final four regular-season games after missing the previous 17 with a calf injury.“Me and Chris (Paul) talk about it all the time,” Crawford said. “We’re consumed in basketball every single day of our lives. To be out five weeks and not be able to do anything but watch, I mean, you can take some good things from it.“But it was more bad than good for me because you want to be out there so bad and help your team and just be part of the guys. … The injury is one thing, then coming back and conditioning and trying to get a rhythm, all that stuff sucks. But you’ve go to go through the process sometimes.” The Grand Prix of Long Beach was contested Sunday, but Clippers coach Doc Rivers on Monday threw out his own yellow caution flag.One day after his team walloped the defending NBA champion San Antonio Spurs 107-92 in Game 1 of their Western Conference first-round playoff series, Rivers was pumping the brakes.“We can’t get intoxicated with one won game,” Rivers said. “We do, we’re in trouble. And the point is that no matter what happens, you’re playing a team that’s won multiple titles.“There’s nothing you can do to shake their confidence and you’re just going to have to keep playing. If you come in thinking something different, then it’ll be a long night.”center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more