first_imgDAY6 is for everybody It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Last year, the USOC honored Tommie Smith and John Carlos, whose raised-fist salute during “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the 1968 Olympics stands as one of the seminal moments in sports protests.National anthems are played at the Olympics to honor the winners of events.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogUSOC CEO Scott Blackmun said: “Our stance on this is fairly clear, and we recognize the rights of athletes to express themselves.” Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Forgotten man: Derrick Favors ready to bounce back with Jazz Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene How to help the Taal evacueescenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson MOST READ Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Michael Phelps, center, carries the US flag during the opening ceremonies of the 2016 Rio Olympics in Brazil. APPARK CITY, Utah — The leader of the American Olympic movement says the U.S. Olympic Committee recognizes the right of athletes to express themselves at the Games, even though Olympic rules forbid political protests.The comments came Monday, in the wake of shows of solidarity among NFL players who were angered by President Donald Trump’s stance on kneeling during the national anthem.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

first_imgProsecutors alleged the systems were sensitive and labeled NOFORN, or barred from the view of foreign nationals. Defense attorneys argued that Mak had given presentations on the information on the disks at symposiums that were open to foreigners. Defense attorney Marilyn Bednarski, who called the government’s case against Mak “an alarmist overreaction,” argued that the government did not place restrictions on the information on the disks until several months after Mak’s arrest, so he could not have known about it. Staples said a person must first apply to the State Department for a license to send out the information, and Mak never did, despite his intensive training in how to handle classified and sensitive information. Staples told jurors that in 1989, the State Department barred the export of any military technology to China, and that “barely nothing on these disks could be sent to China.” After the verdicts, Staples said that Mak never sought permission for the presentations. SANTA ANA – A naturalized U.S. citizen from China was convicted Thursday of sending sensitive information on submarine technology that he worked on at a defense contractor job in Orange County. Chi Mak, 66, of Downey was found guilty of five counts of conspiracy to violate export control laws and other charges. He also was convicted of two counts of attempting to send sensitive material to China, acting as a foreign agent without notifying the U.S. government and making false statements to federal agents. Mak faces up to 35 years in prison, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Greg Staples. Under sentencing guidelines, that amount would probably be less, but it will still be “a substantial” prison term, he said. The eight-woman, four-man panel deliberated less than three days. Mak, an electrical engineer at Power Paragon in Anaheim, was accused of conspiring with his relatives to send an encrypted computer disk to China in October 2005 that contained information on the Quiet Electric Drive power system designed to make submarines quieter, as well as a solid state power switch for ships. Mak and his wife, Rebecca Chiu, were arrested in their Downey home shortly after his brother, Tai Mak, and his wife, Fuk Li, were arrested on Oct. 28, 2005, at Los Angeles International Airport, as they prepared to board a plane. Prosecutors allege that Tai Mak had an encrypted disk so that the information within would not be found. Mak told agents who later questioned him that he had given documents relating to research for the U.S. Navy to his brother so that Tai Mak could select engineering books for Chi Mak while his brother was in Hong Kong, according to the indictment. Tai Mak’s son, Billy Yui Mak, who is accused of encrypting the material, was arrested later. The other family members are scheduled to go to trial on June 5. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_imgYouTube Premium (previously called YouTube Red) eliminates ads across all videos, including music, and adds access to YouTube’s originals, including “Cobra Kai,” an offshoot of the “Karate Kid” movies; sci-fi series “Origin”; sitcom “Foursome”; “Escape the Night” with Joey Graceffa; and “The Thinning” dystopian films starring Logan Paul and Peyton List.The deal is available only to full-time students in the U.S. right now. YouTube says it will expand the offers to other countries in the future.To be eligible for YouTube’s special discounts, you must be enrolled as a full-time student at a Title IV accredited college or university in the United States and must be verified as a student by user-verification system SheerID. The deal isn’t available to students who have previously subscribed to YouTube Red, YouTube Music Premium, YouTube Premium or Google Play Music.Users can sign up for the YouTube Premium student plan at youtube.com/premium/student and the YouTube Music Premium student plan at youtube.com/musicpremium/student. Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15center_img YouTube hopes to reel in college students as paying customers with steeply discounted pricing plans for its ad-free streaming services.The video service has launched student plans for YouTube Music Premium priced at $4.99 per month — a 50% discount off the regular $9.99 monthly price — and for YouTube Premium at available $6.99, a 42% discount from the standard $11.99 monthly fee. In addition, students who sign up for YouTube Premium by Jan. 31, 2019, can secure a special rate of $5.99 per month.YouTube Music Premium, the latest incarnation of Google’s music-streaming service, provides advertising-free access to millions of songs, official albums and playlists, as well as a catalog of music videos, remixes, live performances, covers and more. It also provides background listening and offline access features.last_img read more