first_imgThe president of the Central Bank of Liberia Staff Association (CEBSA) has assured his colleagues that every member’s voice will be heard at all times as long as he stands to serve as their president and with adequate support from them (the workers).Mr. D. Bouleigh Cooper said though effective communication is not easy, but he will do all he can in his power to ensure that cordial working relationship exists between the workers’ association and the CBL administration.The president of CEBSA made the statement on Saturday, January 18, at the induction ceremony of his leadership in Monrovia.He acknowledges that though there has been some level of cooperation between the administrations and the workers of the bank, but he wants to take that (working relation) to another new dimensions.CEBSA president indicated that his administration will continue to expand and improve a good working relationship with the administration in seeking the common welfare of the CBL as well as it employees.Mr. Cooper, who is also the sixth sitting president of CEBSA used the occasion to appeal to the CBL management to ensure that incentives that will motivate staff to do more for the entity should paramount.The Central Bank of Liberia workers’ union president reminded his colleagues that CBL was “all” they have.“We need to take our jobs seriously, professionally that will reflect the signal and loyalty to our bosses,” Cooper told CBL employees.According to him, there are much to put on the table (creating a vibrant working environment for staff, administration) than to receive.Also speaking at the program, the managing director of Liberia Petroleum Refining Company (LPRC), T. Nelson Willaims, II, urged the leadership of CEBSA to be focused and committed to their job.Serving as installing officer, the LPRC boss said to serve is not easy but with commitment and transparency CEBSA can improve the entity (CBL).Mr. Williams urged the executives of CEBSA to be a good leaders; adding: “You must be a good servant to the people.”He further acknowledged them to be steadfast in seeking the welfare of their members.For his part, Leroy Z. B. Nuah, former president of CEBSA, who gave the overview of the association said that during the time of the National Bank of Liberia, it was then called “National Bank Social and Athletic club” (NBSAC).According to the president emeritus of CEBSA, NBL Social and Athletic club in collaboration with the management of the Bank held year-end beach party, where each year employees from various departments were honored for most dedicated, most hard working and most punctual employees of the Bank.He said following the establishment of the CBL, there was no organization that could represent the voices of the staff as it was done at NBL, until July 2004, when the late Executive Governor, Charles E. Green, thought it wise to re-establish the social club at present day CBL.Adding that the sole purpose of the club was to bring together staff during happy and sad moments and also advocate for them.Meanwhile, the first election of CEBSA was held in 2004, 2007 second election and third election in 2013, which brought Copper and his administration into power. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgThe report, released in Johannesburg on Wednesday, compared the NSC certificate with the Cambridge International Examinations and the International Baccalaureate Organisation as well as the Namibian Senior Certificate. “Our findings are that this qualification [NSC] is pitched at the correct level. It has got the necessary requirements of a robust qualification .the learners who pass this certificate can compete favourably with learners from other education systems,” Umalusi CEO Rakometsi Mafu said at the release of the report. Equitable admissions policy Hesa manager Cobus Lotter said the research compared the NSC to the Cambridge International Examinations because it had a footprint in South Africa. Data indicates that it has more than 40 centres in the country and over 150 worldwide. 12 August 2010 Source: BuaNews “The South African public can be reassured that the NSC is a good, solid, robust qualification,” said Burroughs. ‘Good, solid qualification’center_img She added that one of the recommendations of the report was to highlight the importance of good teacher training “so that we maintain our credibility in the international education landscape”. Based on these findings, Hesa will then formulate an equitable policy that will lead to consistency in admission decisions. Hesa’s criticisms do, however, hint that there is a clear need for well-qualified teachers in South Africa. Liz Burroughs, a senior manager at Umalusi, said the main aim of the study was to establish the continuity of standards between the old and new qualifications. The NSC replaced the Senior Certificate in 2008. Already, South Africa was the eighth most favourable university destination in the world, he said. The report will further assist in determining the minimum requirements for admission to degree, diploma and higher certificate admission status in the country. A new report issued by education quality assuror Umalusi and Higher Education South Africa (Hesa) finds that the National Senior Certificate (NSC) and its curriculum are on par with international standards, and are favourable when compared to other international qualifications.last_img read more

first_imgSuspected pirates keep their hands in the air as directed by the guided-missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf as the visit, board, search and seizure team prepares to apprehend them. Vella Gulf is the flagship for Combined Task Force 151, a multi-national task force conducting counterpiracy operations to detect and deter piracy in and around the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean and Red Sea.(Image: Jason R Zalasky, US Navy) MEDIA CONTACTS • Obinna Anyadike  Editor-in-Chief, Irin  +254 20 7622 1343 RELATED ARTICLES • Co-operating to cut down piracy • Maritime piracy under the spotlight • Eye in the sky benefits society • SA women marine pilots make history • SA Agulhas in historic polar tripSource: Irin NewsRusting hulks of capsized boats decorate the waters around Berbera, a port city in the self-declared republic of Somaliland. Further down Somalia’s coast, pirates raid freighters in the Gulf of Aden. But efforts are under way to help Somalis make better use of their 3 300km coastline – the longest on the African continent – by increasing fishing and seafood exports to lucrative markets in the Middle East and Europe.In 2013, the EU will spend US$6.5-million (R57-million) to help Somaliland pursue its long-term goal of netting 120 000 tons of seafood each year, the sale of which could generate $1.2 billion (R10.5-billion) in foreign currency.“In Somalia, people have lived for a long time with their backs to the sea,” says Isabel Faria de Almedia, the EU development chief for Somalia. “It’s a country of agro-pastoralists with a strong nomadic tradition. We think there is a huge potential for the consumption and export of fish.”Until the second half of the 20th century, few Somalis outside fishing communities consumed fish and the sector was entirely artisanal in nature. This began to change in the 1970s with the development of better cold-storage facilities and the creation, with Soviet help, of an industrial fleet.But for want of spare parts and maintenance, these vessels quickly fell into disuse. See here for a detailed, if slightly dated, overview of the Somali fishing industry. Luring pirates away from piracyIn the middle of the last decade, Somali fishermen complained they were being forced into piracy by foreign trawlers operating illegally in waters claimed by Somalia.Coastal Somalis recount as a “eureka” moment the time self-appointed coastguards impounded a foreign trawler and levied a fine on its owners; they quickly realized seizing vessels was more lucrative than competing with commercial vessels for dwindling fish stocks.Amina Farah Arshe, who employs 40 fishermen aboard 11 vessels from Berbera, the main port of Somaliland, says fishing revenues could provide an alternative to raiding freighters far into the Indian Ocean.“We can stop it by empowering the people. We can stop it by giving jobs to the youth. People would make money, the government would collect tax revenues, and piracy would diminish,” she said. “But we need support. We need training, boats, fishing gear and cold storage.”For years, the UN has said that tackling Somali piracy should involve creating work for the jobless young Somalis who board skiffs, armed with assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, to hunt vessels on the high seas.But only now has the security situation made this a realistic possibility. Somalia has recently selected its most viable president and government in years. Somali and AU forces have driven Al-Shabab insurgents from major cities.Out at sea, foreign warships and on-deck private security guards deter piracy. Only 70 raids took place in the first nine months of 2012, compared to 199 in the same period last year, according to the International Maritime Bureau. Logistical challengeSomalia’s new president, Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, says he wants to “increase local food production to end poverty forever”. Some 2.1-million people in the country are faced with hunger, particularly in the turbulent south.The future of large-scale fishing in Somali waters is tied up in a legal dispute over how far these waters extend from the country’s coastline.While the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which Somalia ratified in 1989, establishes 12 nautical miles from shore as an international norm for states’ territorial waters, Somalia has asserted sovereignty over seas up to 200 nautical miles from the coast. Mogadishu has resisted international pressure to declare these outer waters an exclusive economic zone, a designation that confers numerous rights to the country but falls short of full sovereignty.Alan Cole, who runs anti-piracy operations for the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, says Somaliland’s Berbera and Puntland’s Bosaso have real potential. But exporting fresh fish from the remote central coast – site of many pirate bases – offers a “logistical challenge”, he said.The UN agency spends $40-million (R351-million) each year tackling piracy, helping prosecute sea-borne raiders, training and equipping coastguards, creating jobs, and providing refrigerated trucks and storerooms to the fishing industry.“We need to get the fishing fleets of Somalia back to sea,” Cole said. “One of the challenges for fisherman is that the pirates will steal your fish. So you come back to the same issue of needing wider maritime security for Somalia so that the fishermen can safely make their living at sea.”last_img read more

first_imgA court in Arunachal Pradesh’s Lepa Rada district has convicted the son of State Industries Minister Tumke Bagra for murder and sentenced him to life imprisonment.Kajum Bagra had on the night of March 26, 2017, fatally shot the victim named Kenjum Kamsi outside a hotel in Aalo, the headquarters of West Siang district, after an argument. A CCTV camera installed outside the hotel had captured the incident. Bagra had pleaded not guilty to the charges for murder and violation of the Arms Act.last_img read more

first_imgAs most of the Dutch team was packing its orange bags in the country’s only indoor nets on a freezing night in late January, hard-hitting all-rounder Ryan Ten Doeschate was gearing up to play for Tasmania against New South Wales in the finals of Australia’s Twenty20 competition.Ryan Ten DoeschateSouth African-born Ten Doeschate and South Australia’s Tom Cooper are the higher-profile players in a Netherlands team of relative unknowns that is also made up of students, a tobacconist and a hamburger restaurant owner. Many of the players had to take time off work or study to travel to the World Cup.But the Dutch part-timers have proven in the past they are capable of pulling off a shock, beating hosts England by four wickets in the opening match of the 2009 Twenty20 World Cup.”The target for us is obviously to cause upsets, make an impression,” New Zealand-born captain Peter Borren said. “And to do that, we need to knock off one of the big boys.”Realistically, however, the Netherlands will be targeting their two last Group B matches, against Bangladesh and Ireland as games to win.Before those two matches, the Netherlands takes on England in its opener at Nagpur on Feb. 22, followed by West Indies, South Africa and India.Borren said subcontinent cricket is not new to the team as it embarks on its fourth World Cup campaign.”In the last four years we’ve probably been to India maybe five or six times so everyone’s had some experience there,” he said. “But obviously not all that much experience playing at that level in those conditions.”advertisementNetherlands made its World Cup debut in 1996 and appeared at the last two editions of cricket’s showcase tournament in 2003 and 2007. So far its only two World Cup wins have been over fellow minnows Namibia, in 2003, and Scotland in 2007.Selector and former captain Tim de Leede said the Netherlands has no genuinely fast pace bowler to spearhead its attack and will rely on steady medium pacers and a pair of economical slow bowlers – off spinner Adeel Raja and left arm orthodox Pieter Seelaar.”They have to bowl line and length and hopefully the fielders will do as well as they possibly can to support them,” De Leede said.In its race to catch up with the rest of the cricketing world, the Netherlands has been using specialist fielding, batting, bowling and wicketkeeping coaches and has a full-time coach, Australian Peter Drinnen.”They have more professionals than ever. They have a full-time coach, they have specialists coming in … so there are really no excuses any more,” De Leede said.Batting is the Netherlands’ strongest suit, with Eric Szwarczynski, a fluid strokemaker who has a knack for finding gaps in the field and Worcester’s Alexei Kervezee likely to open. Pakistan-born bowler Mudassar Bukhari – usually a lower order hitter – also can open in limited-overs matches.The middle order will feature professionals Ten Doeschate, Borren and Cooper, who has a one-day average of 65.44 in his 10 matches for the Netherlands – most of them against second-tier associate opposition, including 80 not out on debut against Scotland.Seelaar says the likes of Borren and Ten Doeschate have changed the way many homegrown players approach the game and he hopes the new mind set will pay dividends at the World Cup.”I think we now are getting close to a professional setup now,” he said. “The pros teach us how to be pros.”last_img read more