Blogs

Wyandanch Murder Suspect Nabbed in Fla.

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York U.S. Marshals have apprehended a Copiague man wanted for fatally shooting a 35-year-old man in the victim’s hometown of Wyandanch two years ago, Suffolk County police said.Boyd Holland was arrested in Orlando, Florida and was returned Tuesday to Long Island, where is facing a charge of second-degree murder.Homicide Squad detectives said the 22-year-old suspect shot and killed Eric Brooks at 11:34 p.m. on May 9, 2012.Police had said that officers responding to a 911 call reporting gunshots fired when, upon arrival, they found the victim suffering from a bullet wound to the abdomen in the backyard of a house on North 22nd Street.Brooks had been taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, where he was pronounced dead.Holland will be arraigned Wednesday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img read more

SBU Prof. Named First Andrew Carnegie Fellow from a Long Island College

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Stony Brook University professor was the first educator from a college on Long Island to be named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow when he won the prestigious fellowship this week.Jared Farmer, an environmental historian and award-winning adjunct professor of history, plans to use the $200,000 award to complete a creative non-fiction book on the human relationship with long-lived trees and our larger relationship with nature in a time of climate change.“I am bringing together the history of trees and the science of longevity to contemplate the ethics and politics of long-term thinking in the Anthropocene,” said Farmer. “I’m a historian by training, but this new project includes aspects of science writing as well as creative writing.”Farmer is one of 35 fellows recognized by the program, which aims to support emerging humanities scholars that are working to strengthen the US democracy, drive creativity, explore global connections and improve environments. The program launched in 2015 and each fellow publishes a book or major study.The professor, who earned his PhD in history from Stanford University, previously authored three books, including the award-winning On Zion’s Mount: Mormons, Indians, and the American Landscape. He began teaching at Stony Brook a decade ago.“Climate change is not only the policy problem of our time; it is also a problem of time,” Farmer said. “It requires thinking and caring in the long term—beyond the moment, the individual, and the species. I think it’s important to find historical precedents for long-term stewardship of the more-than-human world. To the extent possible in 2017, I want to write a hopeful book—one that shows the shared solicitudes of science, religion, and the humanities.”last_img read more

James H. Jasper

first_imgJames Harmon Jasper, 81, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away Sunday February 24, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio.He was born September 9, 1937 in Somerset, KY, son of the late Edward Jasper and Ada (Cook) Jasper. James served with the Kentucky National Guard.James worked as head of maintenance with Cooks Screen with over 42 years of service.He enjoyed yard work, gardening, camping and horse shoes. James loved to hunt and fish, but his favorite thing was playing with his grandkids.James is survived by his loving spouse of 60 years, Imogene Jasper (Adams), daughters, Brenda (Mack) Johnson of Aurora, IN, Charlotte (Ron) Gascon of Milan, IN, Diana (Tony) Womack of Moores Hill, IN, Bonnie (Mark) Pennington of Moores Hill, IN; three siblings, Ron (Brenda) Jasper of Attica, IN, Don (Peggy) Jasper of Attica, IN, Barbara Shelley of Waynesburg, KY.; 12 grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; 1 great, great-grandchild; .He was preceded in death by his parents Edward and Ada; siblings, George, Roy, Paul & Jessie Jasper, and Dorothy McKinnley.Friends will be received Thursday, February 28, 2019, 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, 219 Mechanic Street, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at the Funeral Home, at 2:00 pm.Interment will follow in the Mt. Sinai Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana.Contributions may be made to the Hogan Township Fire Department. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

Owens, Badgers reunite in NCAA tournament

first_imgJust after finishing his playing career with the Wisconsin men’s basketball team back in 2004, Freddie Owens had not quite considered himself to be coaching material.Greg Gard, an assistant coach then and the associate head coach now, admits that at the time he did not see Owens, a hero of the 2003 NCAA tournament, in a suit and tie along the bench either.But after a short lived professional career came to a close in 2006, Owens found himself coaching at the grassroots level of the game and slowly began working his way up.He eventually turned his eye back on Madison in 2010 and applied for the open assistant coach position on Bo Ryan’s staff, and the head coach even considered Owens a finalist for the job.But, despite having once picked out Owens for a future coach, Ryan felt the timing just was not right.“Freddie just didn’t have the years of experience yet,” Ryan said.As a coach should, Ryan remained encouraging, telling Owens to gain more experience and reminding him that things have a funny way of coming back around.But coaching against Owens probably was not what Ryan meant.After leaving Wisconsin without a job, Owens stayed at his assistant coach position at Montana – the very team the NCAA selection committee paired with Wisconsin in the first round of this year’s tournament.The two teams tip off Thursday in Albuquerque at 1:10 p.m. central.“We were [excited] just trying to figure out what seed they were going to give us,” Owens said. “But once we saw that we got a 13-seed, and let alone, against my alma mater, it was an awesome deal. Everyone’s real excited around here.”With Owens on the other end of the sideline, the game will reunite Ryan and the rest of the Badgers with the man responsible for one of the program’s fondest memories.In the second round of the 2003 NCAA tournament – Ryan’s second year at UW – 5-seed Wisconsin faced a 13-point deficit against 13-seed Tulsa with 3:36 remaining. But the Badgers put together a vintage March Madness comeback and pulled within two points with 12 seconds remaining.In the game’s waning moments, Devin Harris sprinted upcourt with the ball, worked off a high ball screen, drove to the lane and dished it to a wide-open Owens in the corner.Owens rose up and sunk the three with one second left, topping off one of the best come-from-behind victories in program history.The year before, he also ended Michigan State’s 53-game home win by hitting the game-winner with 25 seconds left.“That expression, ‘It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, but the fight in the dog,’ and Freddie – he’d be a poster guy for that saying,” Ryan said, claiming Owens was better known for his defense. “Tough. Played hard.”A native of Milwaukee, the 6-foot-2 guard played for the Badgers from 2002-04, starting the final two years of his career, and helped UW win regular season Big Ten titles in 2002 and 2003 as well as a tournament banner in 2004.He was one of five players to average 10 points or more as a junior before averaging 6.8 points per game and coming in second on the team in assists as a senior.Following graduation, Owens zeroed in on continuing his playing career and waved off the idea of coaching.He recalls a story he heard from Harris, who, in 2004, was accompanied by Ryan in New York City for the NBA draft:“He was on the bus with coach Ryan, heading over to Madison Square Garden, and coach Ryan had mentioned to him, ‘I see Freddie getting into coaching one day,’” Owens recounted. “He told me that and I was like ‘No, I want to play. I’m fresh out of college; I’m ready to go make some money playing.’”But his talents didn’t take him too far. He played professionally in Latvia from 2005-06 before enlisting as an AAU coach for a year to stay close to the game.“It’s the next best thing to playing,” Owens said. “I started coaching at AAU and really fell in love with … game-planning and mentoring young kids.”Now 30 years old, Owens helps lead a Montana (25-6) team that features nearly five players averaging double figures and has won its last 14 games, winning its conference tournament in the process. Meanwhile, Wisconsin (24-9) is fresh off a semifinal loss in the Big Ten tournament and finished in fourth place during the regular season.That built a relatively strong likelihood the two teams could be paired together to kick off the tournament’s first weekend. Ryan said he had a feeling it could happen, and once it was confirmed Sunday, Owens and the UW coaching staff made sure to exchange quick pleasantries before diving into the strategizing.“‘Congrats on the season up to this point and see you in New Mexico,’” Owens said. “Pretty short and brief just because both sides have a lot of work to do.”The thought of going up against the Grizzlies – or, as UW’s dubbed them: “The Fighting Freddie Owenses” – had Ryan smiling after the selection as well. But Ryan knows that Owens gives the Grizzlies an extra dose of familiarity not too often seen outside the Big Ten.“Freddie might be the most popular guy with [Montana head coach Wayne Tinkle] right now,” he said.But that hasn’t prevented anyone at Wisconsin from smiling at the thought of him as Thursday approaches. As might be expected, everyone’s happy to see him rising in the ranks of the profession – but they’d like him to hold off on any March Madness magic just this time.“He works really hard; he always stays in touch,” Gard said. “I’m happy for Freddie.“We’ll see how happy I am Thursday afternoon.”last_img read more