first_img…as 2-week UK funded inter-agency training concludesBy Jarryl BryanWith the conclusion of anti-corruption training that had involved investigators drawn from different agencies, United Kingdom white collar crime expert Sam Sittlington cited the need and possibility for more training to be provided.He made this statement during the conclusion ceremony of the UK funded, two-week long training exercise. Sittlington, who is an adviser to the Special Organised Crime Unit (SOCU), zeroed in on some of the areas the ranks covered during the training; including preserving the continuity of technical evidence such as computer.“Over the course of the past two weeks, the participants have been involved in learning about fraud investigations, typologies, body language of suspects, tryingInvestigators from several law enforcement agencies pose for a group photo. In the front row, from left: the two UK-based trainers; acting Crime Chief Paul Williams; SOCU Adviser Sam Sittlington; and Senior Adviser to the President, Lieutenant Colonel Russell Combeto identify if someone is a believable liar or unbelievably lying or both.”One aspect, besides power point exercises, involved Sittlington and the trainers presenting ‘facts’ about themselves, which the participants in practise had to decipher the truthfulness of. The SOCU adviser noted some other aspects of operational training when handling fraud probes that the investigators were exposed to.“In terms of the fraud investigations, they learned about the fraud model, they learned about independence, how to conduct their investigations with integrity without conflict of interest. They learned about expertise, how to gather their evidence, they learned about scope of investigations and proportionality.”“They learned about reporting and how their case files may go to the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions) or Police legal adviser. And then, of course, dealing with technical support and how you deal with computers if you’re seizing computers and other technical equipment, how it is done properly and how you should deal with continuity of evidence,” he related.Trans-national crimeMeanwhile, acting Crime Chief Paul Williams noted the usefulness of partnering with experts from different jurisdictions. Observing that local authorities don’t have the answers to everything, Williams said that an important part of training is acknowledging the culture of the jurisdiction and the existing gaps.He spoke of the severity of trans-national crime. According to Williams, mutual assistance is essential to tackling this scourge. Williams charged the ranks to speak out whenever they observe breach of ethics, even from those in authority.It is understood that the training was arranged by the UK High Commission through its Special Adviser attached to the Special Organised Crime Unit. Training was conducted by two UK experts who are experienced in anti-money laundering and white-collar crime investigations.Trainees were drawn from several law enforcement agencies, including SOCU, the Customs Anti Narcotic Unit (CANU), the Criminal Investigative Department, the State Asset Recovery Unit and the Financial Intelligence Unit.There have been several training initiatives for locals where UK specialists have been involved. Last year, local immigration officers underwent the Risk and Liaison Overseas Network (RALON) training conducted by the UK’s Immigration Enforcement International.The training had covered three fundamental issues: the overview of human trafficking, the enhancing of interview skills when dealing with arriving passengers and overall increased awareness of the latest trends and concerns in the wider Caribbean.The UK has done much of its security sector collaboration through the security reform project, which began in 2007, was scrapped in 2009. It was subsequently reintroduced after talks with the administration.Government believes that, once implemented, Guyana’s security sector will be significantly strengthened; and, hopefully, this will lead to a reduction in the number of illicit activities that take place.President David Granger has also said there is need for a stronger Police Force, one that is better equipped with all tools necessary to function adequately.last_img read more

first_imgIt was a fall day in Elk Grove, the suburban town 20 minutes of Sacramento, and Marquese Chriss was going long.The newest Warrior was in eighth grade and playing in a game for the middle school football team. He was a promising tight end. Fast but also long, gangly. Chriss ran a deep route, went up high and sprawled out for the catch but landed awkwardly on his shoulder. The x-ray evidence was not positive: fractured collarbone.Up until that day, all Chriss had wanted to do was play …last_img read more

first_imgPhoto: JetBlue. US carriers are increasingly looking at biometric security as a way of ferreting out the bad guys without annoying customers.The latest such passenger-friendly set-up is slated to be rolled out progressively by US low-cost carrier JetBlue this June.Tests start at Boston Logan International, on JetBlue’s nonstop to Aruba’s Queen Beatrix International. JetBlue contends this is the first initiative of its kind for a U.S. airline.Here’s how it works. Passengers who opt in look into a camera that’s connected to a United States Customs and Border Protection (CPB) database.Then the image is matched to their passport, visa or immigration photograph.There’s no need for a boarding pass and, in theory, the security layer gets stronger and while the inconvenience diminishes.“We hope to learn how we can further reduce friction points in the airport experience,” says Joanna Geraghty, JetBlue’s executive vice president of customer experience. The boarding pass piece of the security is “one of the hardest to solve. Self-boarding eliminates boarding pass scanning and manual passport checks.”This is very much a test, not something that you can expect next week at the airfield near you.But its potential clearly has security officials excited about the possibilities.“By transforming current business operations,” says CPB Deputy Executive Assistant Commissioner John Wagner.  “Airlines and airports will have the opportunity to use verified biometrics to ensure a seamless and consistent process for travelers.”“Seamless” is one of the most overused terms in the travel industry today, but if information technology provider SITA’s system lives up to the prospect of truly “seamless” boarding then this small step in Boston will bring huge benefits for flyers and airlines alike.Also using biometrics is a new Delta Air Line initiative that will allow passengers to use fingerprints to check bags, enter a lounge and board an aircraft.The testing ground in this instance is Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and phase one allows Delta SkyMiles members to forego a paper or mobile boarding pass and hard copy ID in favor of using fingerprints to enter the Delta Sky Club.A second phase will expand that the bag check-in and boarding a flight.“We’re rapidly moving toward a day when your fingerprint, iris or face will become the only ID you’ll need for any number of transactions throughout a given day,” says Delta chief operating officer Gil West.Delta is working with CLEAR systems on the project and hopes ultimately to have fingerprint readers at all boarding gates.last_img read more

first_imgHaryana Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar on Tuesday said the State government was discharging all obligations set forth by the Upper Yamuna River Board (UYRB) in terms of share and allocation of water to Delhi.“We decided to release 120 cusecs of additional raw water to Delhi via the river course at the request of Secretary, Ministry of Water Resources. I wish to emphasise that due to acute shortage of water in the Yamuna, Haryana has to shift to a five -group rotation instead of four groups every January. Despite the consequent adverse impact on drinking water supplies to thousands of our villages and several towns, we have never reduced the supply to Delhi. In fact, presently we are supplying 120 cusecs over and above our obligations,” said Mr. Khattar in a demi-official letter sent to Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal in reply to his letter.“It is a harsh fact that the issue of shortage of raw water at Wazirabad and its impact on supplies of VVIP areas has been raised by the Delhi Jal Board for the past 20 years. The current alleged shortage of about 60 million gallons per day (MGD) is 6.7% of the total treatment capacity of more than 900 MGD. This can easily be resolved through internal actions of the DJB,” said Mr. Khattar.Mr. Khattar added: “As for your (Mr. Kejriwal) request, we were supplying about 1,050 cusecs from Munak Canal when Delhi decided to drag Haryana into multiple litigations. We started releasing additional 150 cusecs from Munak, so that about 100-120 cusecs may be received at Wazirabad via DD-8 in the river course. We have decided to extend the period of release of this additional water up to June 30, 2018, subject to the condition that Delhi withdraws all cases from the NGT and Delhi High Court.”last_img read more

first_imgIndia began their journey in the Hockey World Cup on Wednesday by thrashing South Africa 5-0 at the Kalinga Stadium but captain Manpreet Singh said they will try to give minimum chances to World number three Belgium in their next match.”Overall, we played a good game but we still need to improve. We got many chances in the match but we missed them. We could not convert many of the penalty corners. Our next match is with Belgium and we should not miss the crucial chances,” Manpreet said.”Belgium are a good side. They have the ability to punish us for our mistakes. We need to keep our defence strong against them,” he added.India’s next game is against Belgium on December 2. The match is going to be a high-voltage one as Belgium also thrashed Canada by 2-1 in the opening match.Indian team coach head coach Harendra Singh said a mixture of penalty corners (PCs) and field goals ensured the win for India.”No goal was scored against India (/search?query=India) which is a good sign for us. It indicates that our defence was good in the match. The penalty corner conversion rate, however, needs to be improved,” Harendra said.He also talked about the changed role of forward player Akashdeep Singh in the team saying with his ability to eliminate one or two players while on the run is lethal for opponents.”Yes, we have changed his role as this is the demand of the team. He has got the skill and capacity to eliminate one or two players on the run. It becomes lethal for the opponents as we have three strikers who keep floating inside the circle to grab the scoring opportunity. I am happy that he is playing his role pretty well. I hope he continues doing this,” he said.advertisementThree field goals and two penalty corners helped World No.5 India register a comprehensive win in the second match of the evening.World number five India are eyeing to reclaim the World Cup after 43 years, a title which they won only once way back in 1975 in Kuala Lumpur.Simranjeet Singh (43rd, 46th minutes) scored a brace, while Mandeep Singh (10th), Akashdeep Singh (12th) and Lalit Upadhyay (45th) were the other goal getters for India against a South Africa, ranked 10 places below India.The Indians toyed with the South African defence in the first quarter as they mounted numerous attacks on the opposition goal and to their credit succeeded on two occasions to take a comfortable 2-0 lead early on.(With IANS inputs)Also Read | Hockey World Cup 2018: India hammer hapless South Africa for perfect startAlso Read | Hockey World Cup India vs South Africa: HighlightsAlso Read | Hockey World Cup 2018: FULL COVERAGE | FULL SQUADS | SCHEDULElast_img read more