AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email NEW YORK, N.Y. – Americans are gobbling up more of PepsiCo’s Frito-Lay snacks. As for the company’s sodas, customers are apparently less enthusiastic.That’s the quandary for PepsiCo Inc., the soda and snack maker that also owns Gatorade, Mountain Dew, Tropicana and Quaker Oats. Although the company’s Cheetos, Doritos and other snacks dominate supermarket shelves, its North American drinks unit has perennially played second fiddle to the world’s No. 1 beverage maker, Coca-Cola.That story line played out yet again in the company’s third quarter, with PepsiCo reporting a better-than-expected profit as stronger snack sales helped offset a 4 per cent volume decline for the North American drinks unit.Soda volume fell in the region fell in the “mid-single digits,” which PepsiCo partly attributed to its strategy of holding or raising prices. Uncarbonated drinks fell in the “low-single digits.”Coca-Cola reported stronger results for its North American unit a day earlier, with overall volume up 2 per cent. Uncarbonated drinks rose 5 per cent and soda volume was even from a year ago.Despite the volume declines in PepsiCo’s North American beverage unit, CEO Indra Nooyi stressed in a conference call with analysts that the broader $95 billion beverage industry remains a “pretty damn good business” in terms of generating cash for the company.She also suggested that the company’s fortunes could turn as people move away from sodas, given PepsiCo’s leadership position in uncarbonated drinks. Gatorade, for example, leads Coca-Cola’s Powerade in the sports drink category.She noted that sodas now account for about 40 per cent of the beverage industry, down from more than 50 per cent a decade ago, and that the shift away from carbonated soft drinks continues.In the meantime, PepsiCo’s drink business remains a sensitive topic for the company. Activist investor Nelson Peltz’s Trian Fund Management is pushing the company to spin off the beverage unit entirely and merge its remaining food business with Oreo cookie maker Mondelez International.Executives at PepsiCo have shot down the suggestion, saying the company plans to move ahead as a combined drinks and snacks maker. Still, PepsiCo is reviewing a restructuring of its North American beverage unit and plans to update investors on that front early next year.For the quarter, PepsiCo said higher prices helped lift revenue in Europe by 3 per cent. Snacks volume rose while beverage volume slipped.In the region encompassing Asia, the Middle East and Africa, revenue rose 6 per cent on higher prices when excluding the impact of restructuring changes and unfavourable currency exchange rates.PepsiCo earned $1.91 billion, or $1.23 per share, for the three months ending Sept. 7. That compares with $1.9 billion, or $1.21 per share, a year ago when there were more shares outstanding.Not including one-time items, the company said it earned $1.24 per share, above the $1.17 per share analysts expected.Revenue rose 2 per cent to $16.91 billion, less than the $17.02 billion Wall Street expected. The company stood by its full-year earnings forecast for core earnings per share to grow 7 per cent.Shares of PepsiCo rose 1.5 per cent to $81.84. Over the past year, the stock is up almost 15 per cent.___Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi by Candice Choi, The Associated Press Posted Oct 16, 2013 5:16 am MDT PepsiCo’s profit edges up on stronger snack sales; North American drinks falter read more

In resolution 2361, which extends the mandate of the UN Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), the Council condemned the use of heavy weapons by both the Syrian armed forces and armed groups in the ongoing Syrian conflict in the area of separation between Israel and Syria, and underlined that there should be no military activity of the armed opposition groups in that area. It also urged Member States to convey strongly to the Syrian armed opposition groups in UNDOF’s area of operations to halt all activities that endanger UN peacekeepers and to accord them the freedom to carry out their mandate safely and securely. UNDOF was established by the Council in May 1974 to maintain the ceasefire between Israel and Syria, to supervise the disengagement of Israeli and Syrian forces, and to supervise the areas of separation and limitation. Mandate of UNAMID extended until 30 June next yearSimilarly, the Council adopted resolution 2363, in which it extended the mandate of the UN-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) until 30 June 2018. Among other things, the Council also decided that from 31 January next year, UNAMID’s troop and police ceiling shall be reduced to consist of up to 8,735 military personnel and 2,500 police personnel, including individual police officers and members of formed police units. Mandate of UN mission in Mali extended until 30 June 2018Also today, the Council extended the mandate of the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali, known by its French acronym MINUSMA, through June 2018. In adopting resolution 2364, the Council also decided that MINUSMA shall continue to comprise up to 13,289 military personnel and 1,920 police personnel and that its strategic priority shall remain to support the implementation by the Government, the Plateforme and Coordination armed groups, as well as by other relevant Malian stakeholders, of the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali. Furthermore, the Council authorized French forces, within the limits of their capacities and areas of deployment, “to use all necessary means” until the end of MINUSMA’s mandate, “to intervene in support of elements of MINUSMA when under imminent and serious threat upon request of the Secretary-General.” Measures renewed against illicit oil exports in LibyaThe Council also today renewed the measures against illicit oil exports from Libya as well as the mandate of the expert panel assisting the sanctions committee through November this year. In adopting resolution 2362, the Council condemned attempts to illicitly export petroleum, including crude oil and refined petroleum products, from Libya, including by parallel institutions which are not acting under the authority of the Government of National Accord.The Council also raised concerns about activities which could damage the integrity and unity of Libyan State financial institutions and the National Oil Corporation, and stressed the need for the Government of National Accord “to exercise sole and effective oversight” over the National Oil Corporation, the Central Bank of Libya and the Libyan Investment Authority. In the same resolution, the Council decided that the Panel of Experts on the issue shall provide an interim report on its work no later than 28 February 2018, and a final report, with findings and recommendations, by 15 September of next year. read more