AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email NEW YORK, N.Y. – Americans are gobbling up more of PepsiCo’s Frito-Lay snacks. As for the company’s sodas, customers are apparently less enthusiastic.That’s the quandary for PepsiCo Inc., the soda and snack maker that also owns Gatorade, Mountain Dew, Tropicana and Quaker Oats. Although the company’s Cheetos, Doritos and other snacks dominate supermarket shelves, its North American drinks unit has perennially played second fiddle to the world’s No. 1 beverage maker, Coca-Cola.That story line played out yet again in the company’s third quarter, with PepsiCo reporting a better-than-expected profit as stronger snack sales helped offset a 4 per cent volume decline for the North American drinks unit.Soda volume fell in the region fell in the “mid-single digits,” which PepsiCo partly attributed to its strategy of holding or raising prices. Uncarbonated drinks fell in the “low-single digits.”Coca-Cola reported stronger results for its North American unit a day earlier, with overall volume up 2 per cent. Uncarbonated drinks rose 5 per cent and soda volume was even from a year ago.Despite the volume declines in PepsiCo’s North American beverage unit, CEO Indra Nooyi stressed in a conference call with analysts that the broader $95 billion beverage industry remains a “pretty damn good business” in terms of generating cash for the company.She also suggested that the company’s fortunes could turn as people move away from sodas, given PepsiCo’s leadership position in uncarbonated drinks. Gatorade, for example, leads Coca-Cola’s Powerade in the sports drink category.She noted that sodas now account for about 40 per cent of the beverage industry, down from more than 50 per cent a decade ago, and that the shift away from carbonated soft drinks continues.In the meantime, PepsiCo’s drink business remains a sensitive topic for the company. Activist investor Nelson Peltz’s Trian Fund Management is pushing the company to spin off the beverage unit entirely and merge its remaining food business with Oreo cookie maker Mondelez International.Executives at PepsiCo have shot down the suggestion, saying the company plans to move ahead as a combined drinks and snacks maker. Still, PepsiCo is reviewing a restructuring of its North American beverage unit and plans to update investors on that front early next year.For the quarter, PepsiCo said higher prices helped lift revenue in Europe by 3 per cent. Snacks volume rose while beverage volume slipped.In the region encompassing Asia, the Middle East and Africa, revenue rose 6 per cent on higher prices when excluding the impact of restructuring changes and unfavourable currency exchange rates.PepsiCo earned $1.91 billion, or $1.23 per share, for the three months ending Sept. 7. That compares with $1.9 billion, or $1.21 per share, a year ago when there were more shares outstanding.Not including one-time items, the company said it earned $1.24 per share, above the $1.17 per share analysts expected.Revenue rose 2 per cent to $16.91 billion, less than the $17.02 billion Wall Street expected. The company stood by its full-year earnings forecast for core earnings per share to grow 7 per cent.Shares of PepsiCo rose 1.5 per cent to $81.84. Over the past year, the stock is up almost 15 per cent.___Follow Candice Choi at www.twitter.com/candicechoi by Candice Choi, The Associated Press Posted Oct 16, 2013 5:16 am MDT PepsiCo’s profit edges up on stronger snack sales; North American drinks falter read more

← Previous Story VELUX EHF CL: THW Kiel with home win over Atletico, Vive Kielce too strong for Bjerringbro Next Story → Marcus Ahlm leaves THW Kiel at the end of the season Handball was one of the biggest success stories of the London Olympics, where and even renowned US writer Bill Simmons fell in love with the game (http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8213663/handball-handball-handball) (ok, he mostly fell in love with the Swedish women’s team…). Amateur clubs have since sprung up all over the UK, but the true test of the global reach of the sport will be its ability to sustain interest in its annual competitions. With the European Women’s Championship about to throw off in Serbia, I have provided below some pointers to help you sound like an expert as you gather your friends/co-workers to watch the free broadcast of the Championship onhttp://www.ehftv.com/.Main storyline (non-handball-related): When Serbia hosted the European Men’s Championship in January, violence during the semi-final between the hosts and Croatia (and in the days surrounding the game) marred what was otherwise an excellent and well-organised tournament. Let’s hope that the ugly side of the Balkans’ recent history does not find its way into the women’s championship.Main storyline (handball-related): Most of the key players from the winning Olympic team are back for Norway, but can they retain the European Championship for a fifth consecutive time without star playmaker Gro Hammerseng?Favourites: NorwayBiggest rival: FranceOutside bet for the title: RomaniaExpectations for the host: As Serbia is in the “easier half of the draw”, getting out of the first group stage is a must. Beyond that, the team is capable of a top-six finish.Serbia’s best player: Andrea Lekić (playmaker)Seven players to watch:* Klara Woltering (goalkeeper, Germany)* Nina Kamto Njitam (pivot, France)* Ann Grete Nørgaard (left wing, Denmark)* Cristina Neagu (left back, Romania)* Anita Görbicz (playmaker, Hungary)* Nerea Pena (right back, Spain)* Linn-Kristin Riegelhuth Koren (right wing, Norway)Five unmissable group games:* Serbia – Norway (4 December), the hosts open the tournament against the four-time defending champions* Romania – Russia (4 December), two of the most talented teams meet in what is becoming a modern rivalry* Russia – Montenegro (5 December), no rest for Russia as they take on the new-look Olympic silver medallists* Romania – Montenegro (7 December), the potential decider for the top spot in Group D* Hungary – Spain (7 December), with their “group of death” rivals severely weakened by injuries, Hungary and Spain should be playing for the top spot in Group CEvery team in a sentence (in my predicted order of finish):* Norway – their constant winning is getting a little boring, but I just can’t see past the current Olympic, World and European champions* Spain – the return of Nerea Pena from injury and the nationalisation of Alexandrina Barbosa give the Olympic bronze medallists both the quality and depth to compete with Norway* France – there are some question marks about goalkeeping and consistency, but there is no doubting the quality of the outfield players* Romania – the return of Cristina Neagu from a long-term injury should give this talented team a boost* Montenegro – with the retirement of Bojana Popović and Maja Savić the team will take a step back, but should remain competitive at the highest levels* Serbia – An opportunity for a relatively unknown set of players to use home court advantage and make a name for themselves* Hungary – domestic clubs are thriving, and now it’s time for the national team to regain its status as a contender, two years before co-hosting the European Championship* Russia – the core of this team remains young and on a learning curve, but at some point Russian fans will begin to lose their patience waiting for a return to the glory days* Denmark – after Denmark’s embarrassing performance in London, a young and experimental squad has been assembled with the future in mind* Ukraine – in impressive form this year, and could be a surprise package* Germany – could have contended if it weren’t for a slew of injuries to key players* Sweden – would you trust a team built around Isabelle Gulldén (of Usain Bolt’s bedroom fame/infamy)?* Croatia – just too many key players missing for them to be competitive* Macedonia – has the potential to finish anywhere between second and bottom in the weak Group B* Czech Republic – getting out of Group A would be a real achievement* Iceland – the last-minute replacement for original hosts Holland has little real chance in a group with Montenegro, Romania and RussiaTEXT: Ben Shafran ehf european championship 2012ehf veluxeuropean championship read more