Extensive renovations have finished at the first ever Tim Hortons doughnut shop, which has been at the corner of Ottawa and Dunsmure in Hamilton for 50 years.“Store One” re-opened quietly this weekend and it has been jammed ever since with customers who want a jolt of the past with their java.The unassuming little re-purposed garage is gone leaving no doubt that this corner of Ottawa Street North is home to the original donut shop opened by a hockey player and a police officer.Customers walk in to a full service store, with some retro design touches. Up the stairs you’ll find a little corner that looks just like it did 50 years ago, including the original uniform, and treats that were on the menu back then.You can also take a stroll down memory lane.Sandy Vanrijn has spent 24 years working at Tim Hortons and curated the new museum portion of the store.The grand opening celebration is set for January 7. read more

$13 a pack? NYC mayor wants highest cigarette prices in US FILE – In this April 7, 2017, file photo, cigarette butts are discarded in an ashtray outside a New York office building. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a plan on April 19, 2017, to raise the price of a pack of cigarettes from $10.50 to $13 in the city. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) by The Associated Press Posted Apr 20, 2017 9:49 am MDT Last Updated Apr 20, 2017 at 10:20 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email NEW YORK, N.Y. – New York Mayor Bill de Blasio is pushing for the nation’s biggest city to also be the country’s priciest spot to buy a pack of smokes.De Blasio is backing an effort to raise the price of a pack of cigarettes from $10.50 to $13, which he says would be the nation’s highest.The Democrat announced his support Wednesday for a series of legislative proposals designed to drastically cut tobacco use in the city by the year 2020. De Blasio says his goal is to reduce the number of smokers by 160,000. An estimated 900,000 New York City residents currently smoke.“What we’re here today talking about is saving lives,” said Dr. Mary T. Bassett, the city’s health commissioner, who appeared with the mayor at offices of the American Heart Association. “We want to make it easier to quit and harder to smoke.”The proposals are set for hearings later this month.The city council also will consider legislation to gradually reduce by half the number of licenses issued to retailers to sell tobacco products. Philadelphia and San Francisco have similar licensing restrictions.An American Cancer Society study found that 8,992 retail outlets were licensed to sell tobacco in New York as of October, and about a third of those were within 500 feet of a school.Other proposals would set minimum prices and create taxes on smokeless tobacco and small cigars, and require sellers of electronic cigarettes to obtain licenses. read more