first_img How to Cook Steak in the Oven Editors’ Recommendations The Peached Tortilla’s Fried Rice Recipe Is Just Plain Delicious How to Make Loco Moco, a Hawaiian Staple Dish 7 Fall Cocktail Recipes to Enjoy With Cooler Weather Waking up hungover is terrible when you’re in college. You may be in a strange apartment, covered in marker drawings, and missing a shoe. You may still have the taste of jungle juice in your mouth. You may not remember going to Cookout at 3:30 AM and ordering six bacon cheese hot dogs. In short, it’s terrible (except for that last part, which is awesome).Waking up hungover as an adult, though, is even worse. It hits you like a truckload of regret and sadness, and you spend hours wishing that the world would just go away.Some things help this, of course. Water, of course. Gatorade. Crackers and toast, convincing someone else to drive you to the nearest Bojangles.To Keith Barnofski and his business partners, though, there was another option. Something simple and delicious. Peanut butter, jacked up on caffeine. It’d be perfect, they realized, for those rough mornings after throwing one too many back or for college students in a rush to get to class. Thus, Steem Caffeinated Peanut Butter was born.One serving of Steem (2 tbsp) has around as caffeine as a cup of coffee: a cup of coffee usually has between 80 and 135mg per 8-ounce cup while Steem comes in at 150mg per serving.Naturally, we had to try it.Related: Chefs Share Their Favorite Thanksgiving Dessert RecipesTo make sure the test was, as they say, scientific—we could not let you, the readers, down—our spirits writer made sure to test it under the proper conditions: the morning after a Halloween party.The peanut butter:The flavor, if you like/are used to natural peanut butters, is great. There is a good balance of sweet and salty that isn’t overpowering one way or the other. Steem is thick and a little gritty, but again, nothing out of the ordinary for people who have eaten natural peanut butter.The caffeine:The Mayo Clinic recommends up to 400mg as safe for adults. Two quick spoonfuls of Steem brings you close to that amount, without having to get out of bed and brew coffee (leaving the jar bedside seemed like the best idea ever at first sight of it that morning).The results:It wasn’t an immediate miracle cure, but it did help. Taking certain headache medicines is bad for you after you’ve been drinking, so this all-natural product helps on in that respect. As mentioned above, convenience is also a benefit—you don’t even need a spoon. You can just scoop some out with a finger if you’re so inclined.Overall:In the end, it’s easy to see why this helps with hangovers or getting to class on time or running races or any of the other times when Steem can be put into action.For those who are a little more motivated in their anti-hangover cure procedures, check out this recipe for Five-Ingredient No-Bake Caffeinated Peanut Butter Balls from their blog:Ingredients:1 cup semi-sweet chocolate morsels1 stick of salted butter1 sleeve of graham crackers1 cup confectioner’s sugar1 jar of STEEM Caffeinated Peanut ButterProcess:Throw your oven down the stairs! Who needs that hunk of junk, right? You can make peanut butter bars now!Did you ever notice that there’s nine graham crackers in a sleeve? Not eight, not ten; nine. Anyone else think that’s weird? Anyway, use all of your bottled rage to crush the graham crackers into crumbs. Try not to get any tears of catharsis into the mixing bowl.Cup of confectioner’s sugar? Dump it in! Melt a stick of butter. And no, wiseguy, you don’t need no stinkin’ oven to melt the butter. Put it into a microwave safe bowl and nuke it for about 40 seconds. Then throw it into the mix.Pour the entire contents of one brave jar of STEEM into the bowl and mix until your forearm is all veiny.Take that big, beautiful, pasty mess out of that bowl and drop it into your lined baking pan. Press it down as evenly as you can, pushing it all the way to the corners. Make sure your hands are clean. Actually, you should have done that long before here. Are your hands clean? Go back in time and wash your hands before getting this far. Gross.Put a cup of semi-sweet morsels in a microwave-safe bowl (even the same one you used to melt the butter so you can get that .00001g of buttery cholesterol that was left behind) and nuke it for about 50 seconds. It’s touchy; after about 35 or 40 seconds, take the bowl out and try to stir it up a bit. After you nuke it for the last 15 seconds or so, it should be smooth enough to stir, and you’ll see quickly that the remaining morsels are melting and it should smooth out. Don’t give it a chance to harden; quickly pour it on top of your pb layer and spread it around evenly. I don’t go quite all the way to the edges of the pan with the chocolate because it’ll just get stuck to the foil on the edges and chocolate that I can’t eat is a thing that should not happen.Looks good, doesn’t it? Damn right it does. Now put that sucker in the fridge. The fridge is like the anti-oven. Let it set for at least an hour, more like two.Blow everybody’s freaking minds. The Lazy Man’s Guide on How to Make Hard Apple Ciderlast_img read more

Google’s YouTube losing major advertisers upset with videos by Michael Liedtke, The Associated Press Posted Mar 22, 2017 4:57 pm MDT Last Updated Mar 22, 2017 at 6:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email SAN FRANCISCO – AT&T, Verizon and several other major advertisers are suspending their marketing campaigns on Google’s YouTube site after discovering their brands have been appearing alongside videos promoting terrorism and other unsavoury subjects.The spreading boycott confronts Google with a challenge that threatens to cost it hundreds of millions of dollars.YouTube’s popularity stems from its massive and eclectic library of video, spanning everything from polished TV clips to raw diatribes posted by people bashing homosexuals.But that diverse selection periodically allows ads to appear next to videos that marketers find distasteful, despite Google’s efforts to prevent it from happening.Google depends largely on automated programs to place ads in YouTube videos because the job is too much for humans to handle on their own. About 400 hours of video is now posted on YouTube each minute.Earlier this week, Google vowed to step up its efforts to block ads on “hateful, offensive and derogatory” videos.“We know that this is unacceptable to the advertisers and agencies who put their trust in us,” Philipp Schindler, Google’s chief business officer, wrote in a Tuesday blog post.As part of Google’s solution to the problem, Schindler promised to hire “significant numbers” of employees to review YouTube videos and flag them as inappropriate for ads. He also predicted YouTube would be able to address advertisers’ concerns through Google’s recent advancements in artificial intelligence — technology parlance for computers that learn to think like humans.But that promise so far hasn’t appeased AT&T, Verizon Communications and an expanding global list of advertisers that includes Volkswagen, Audi, HSBC Holdings, the Royal Bank of Scotland and L’Oreal.“We are deeply concerned that our ads may have appeared alongside YouTube content promoting terrorism and hate,” AT&T said in a statement. “Until Google can ensure this won’t happen again, we are removing our ads from Google’s non-search platforms.”By extending its ban to everything beyond Google’s search results, AT&T is also effectively pulling its ads from more than two million other websites that depend on Google to deliver ads to their pages.In its statement, Verizon said it decided to pull ads from YouTube to protect its website while it investigates the “weak links” among its digital advertising partners.Both AT&T and Verizon may have an ulterior motive to make YouTube look like an untrustworthy spot for marketers because both companies are trying to sell more digital ads in their own networks.YouTube has become one of the fastest growing parts of Google’s ad system, which generated $79 billion in revenue last year. Google doesn’t disclose how much of that came from YouTube ads, but the research firm eMarketer estimated that the video site accounted for $5.6 billion that amount. EMarketer projected YouTube’s advertising will rise 26 per cent this year to $7 billion, but that prediction came before marketers began to suspend their spending.The YouTube boycott began late last week after an investigation by The Times in London revealed the ads of major brands were appearing in videos delving into contentious themes. read more