Addressing the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, Mr. Annan stressed the need “to create a wider, more expansive definition of our duties to our fellow men and women.” He pointed out that this is an imperative, not a luxury, as today’s world “demands that we tear down the walls in our own minds as well – those separating us from them, rich from poor, white from black, Christian from Muslim from Jew – so that we are able to recognize the untold ways in which we can all benefit from cooperation and solidarity across lines of nationality, race or economic development.”The Secretary-General called on those present to “rethink what belonging means, and what community means, in order to be able to embrace the fate of distant peoples, and realize that globalization’s glass house must be open to all if it is to remain secure.”To achieve this, leaders must make the case for helping the poor and disenfranchised. “Either we help the outsiders in a globalized world out of a sense of moral obligation and enlightened self-interest, or we will find ourselves compelled to do so tomorrow, when their problems become our problems, in a world without walls,” he warned.Drawing lessons from last year’s 11 September terrorist attacks against the United States, Mr. Annan said the global reaction offered hope. “The sight of people gathering in cities in every part of the world from every religion to mourn – and to express solidarity with the people of the United States – proved more eloquently than any words that terrorism is not an issue that divides humanity, but one that unites it.” While acknowledging that the past year had seen a dramatic rise of intolerance, he said acts of bigotry and ignorance represented the “ugly faces” of an exclusive globalization. “An inclusive globalization must address these ills,” he said.While the primary victims of the 11 September attacks were the innocent civilians who lost their lives, and the families who now grieve for them, the Secretary-General pointed out that peace, tolerance, mutual respect, human rights, the rule of law and the global economy were all among the casualties of the terrorists’ acts.”Just as a concerted international response can make the work of terrorists much harder to accomplish, so should the unity born of this tragedy bring all nations together in defence of the most basic right – the right of all peoples to live in peace and security,” he said. “An inclusive globalization will be central to achieving this fundamental goal.” read more

by The Associated Press Posted Jan 4, 2017 12:03 pm MDT Last Updated Jan 4, 2017 at 3:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email NEW YORK, N.Y. – Hulu is teaming up with CBS to add three of the network’s channels to its upcoming live TV streaming service.The service will cost under $40 a month, Hulu CEO Mike Hopkins said at a conference Wednesday, but he did not give a specific price. That will include Hulu’s library of on-demand videos as well.Hulu said the live-streaming service will launch in the coming months, but did not give a date.The CBS deal will give Hulu the right to live-stream the nation’s most-watched broadcast network as well as CBS Sports Network and cable channel Pop.Hulu said that more CBS Corp. channels may be added later. Some shows can also be watched on demand after they have aired.The streaming company already has similar deals with Time Warner Inc., 21st Century Fox and The Walt Disney Co., allowing it to live-stream CNN, Fox, ESPN and several other channels. CBS had been a holdout, focusing instead on its CBS All Access subscription service.While Hulu started as a free site, supported by advertising. But free video has become increasingly more difficult to find as it tries to lure viewers into a subscription — $8 a month for a plan with ads, and $12 without.In recent months, visitors to Hulu.com have been presented with prominent links to subscribe, with links to free video buried in a menu after signing in.Hulu is owned by Disney, Comcast, Time Warner and 21st Century Fox. Hulu adds CBS for upcoming live TV streaming service read more

“I sincerely hope that this trend will be corrected.” the Swiss President, Ueli Maurer, told the 68th session of the General Assembly. “No country imposes its law over that of another country. Problems are not solved by diktat, but through negotiation.”The President spoke on the opening day of the General Debate, making the point that humanitarian efforts were part of his country’s history and it was an honour for Switzerland to make its neutral soil available for peace talks.He reminded delegations that it was 150 years ago that the world renowned humanitarian organization, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) was created in Geneva, and both Switzerland and the ICRC shared a tradition of neutrality and humanitarian action.Going on to speak about the situation in Syria, Mr. Maurer said that serious and systematic violations of international humanitarian law and human rights must not be tolerated – and he called on the Security Council to refer the situation in Syria to the International Criminal Court.In his address, Mr. Maurer appealed to the Security Council’s permanent members to overcome their differences to “find some common ground.” He reiterated the need for no effort to be spared for a consensus to be reached to allow for a political solution and the resumption of talks in Geneva. Separate from bilateral talks between Russia and the United States on a framework for the safeguarding and destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons stockpiles, the United Nations-Arab League Joint Representative Lakhdar Brahimi has pressed on with efforts towards the holding of a long-proposed international peace conference on Syria, commonly referred to as “Geneva II”, after the Swiss city in which it would be held.Mr. Maurer also said global problems need global solutions and the UN should be where that happens. But in order to live up to that role, the UN must be “efficient, innovative and effective,” he added.Acknowledging that the UN is active in a vast range of areas, the President went on to say, “There is perhaps a risk that it has taken on too much and lost focus.” According to a readout issued by a spokesman for Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, the UN chief met today with Mr. Maurer. During the meeting, they discussed the situation in Syria. They also exchanged views on disarmament and on prospects for a concrete outcome from the upcoming High-Level Dialogue on Migration and Development. Mr. Maurer joins a score of other world leaders and high-level officials taking part in the General Debate, which concludes on 1 October. The delegations will present their views and comments on issues of individual national and international relevance. read more