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Students prepare for graduate school exams

first_imgMidterm exams are rapidly approaching, but many upperclassmen are focusing their attention on post-graduate exams. To prepare for these exams, many juniors and seniors reach out to organizations such as Kaplan Test Prep. Liza Weale, executive director of pre-business and pre-graduate programs for Kaplan, said Kaplan Test Prep provided courses to more than 638,000 students worldwide over a single year. Kaplan offers preparation for the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) and Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Admissions tests are one of the only quantitative and objective measures on applications for graduate school. “In Kaplan Test Prep’s 2010 surveys of graduate school, business school and law school admissions officers, the GRE, GMAT and LSAT, respectively, ranked as the most important admissions factors,” Weale said. “According to our medical school admissions officers’ survey, a low MCAT score is the biggest application killer.” However, students can improve their scores dramatically before they send applications to graduate programs by preparing correctly, Weale said. Kaplan offers a range of programs in the classroom and online as well as private tutoring to help students prepare for these tests. Junior Tony Dang is among the many pre-med students preparing for the MCAT in May. Dang said he began slowly preparing for the exam over summer break. “The resources that I have been using so far have been the Kaplan MCAT test books for each individual subject (Physics, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Biology and the verbal portion of the test),” he said. “I also have 10 practice tests that a friend that sent me for extra practice once I’m done with studying the subjects. All of the studying is individualized, meaning that I am not taking any classes in preparation for this test.” Dang said he would like to see different organizations, such as the Princeton Review, on campus in addition to more traditional companies. “I think the [University] offers adequate options to help with test preparation,” he said. “But I would like to see other organizations other than Kaplan on campus.” Senior John Anders prepared for the LSAT with a Kaplan Live Online class during summer 2010 before he took the exam in October. The instructor for the course broadcasted the lesson over a video to students across the country. “Because I took this class, I took five practice exams prior to my actual test day,” he said. “They gave me a feel for where I was before taking the actual exam.” Anders said he utilized the online LSAT tools provided by Kaplan to monitor his studying. “They have this thing called Smart Reports that analyzes your performance on practice tests and diagnoses where you could use more practice and tracks your progress,” Anders said. “I found this to be one of the most helpful tools in my preparation.” Because of the ample resources offered through Kaplan, Anders said he did not seek out resources through Notre Dame other than quiet study space in campus libraries. Anders said he was confident of the test format and types of questions on the exam, and he said he was very happy with his score. “I think knowing exactly what I was going to get on the exam was a huge confidence boost for me, and my scores represented this,” Anders said. “I have the class I took to thank for this.” Saint Mary’s senior Kristen Metzger will take the GRE at the end of the summer and was accepted to the Teach for America program after graduation. Metzger will receive her master’s degree in education at the University of North Carolina while she completes that program. Metzger said she used Kaplan resources to study for past exams and turned to their GRE preparation book because she was familiar with their format. “They also offer practice tests online that I’m sure I will take advantage of,” she said. The “Classroom Anywhere” online option is the most popular among students preparing for exams through Kaplan, Weale said. “Classroom Anywhere courses take the dynamic interaction of a live instructor — who brings all the enthusiasm and inspiration of our Kaplan classrooms — and combines it with state-of-the-art online classroom tools to translate the combination into an online environment that’s designed to enhance the learning experience,” she said. Fees for Kaplan programs vary depending on the program. Weale said thousands of free practice tests and admissions seminars are available across the country. Students unhappy with their preparation or exam score can study with Kaplan for free for the next test date or for three more months for computer-based tests. “Students in our programs see great results, as evidenced by the tens of thousands of students who come to us each year,” Weale said. “Much of Kaplan’s growth comes from reputation and word-of-mouth, so we have a vested interest in helping our students succeed.”last_img read more

Once a Belle, always a Belle

first_imgThe crowd that filed quietly into Regina Chapel on Tuesday filled the room with green – they wore bright green shirts and pinned small green ribbon to their tops. They came to remember Saint Mary’s sophomore Ziqi Zhang. Zhang, 19, who died last week from injuries sustained in an accident between her bike and an SUV outside the entrance to the College on State Route 933. Green was her favorite color. But even as they filled the chapel with green, they also filled the room with stories. During the service, faculty, staff and students from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s stood one after another and shared their memories of an international student who had been their friend. A resident of Regina Hall, Zhang was a dual-degree student majoring in mathematics at Saint Mary’s and taking engineering classes at Notre Dame. She was a resident of Jiangsu Province in China. International student Ariane Umutoni met Zhang shortly after the two arrived at Saint Mary’s. She remembered Zhang as fearless while they discovered America together. “I remember going to the beach with her in Michigan,” Umutoni said. “There were big stones. … She was like, ‘I want a picture there.’ I said, ‘That’s dangerous,’ and she said, ‘Let’s take a chance.’ I was so scared, but she wasn’t. “That was Ziqi.” Umotoni asked the Saint Mary’s community to come together as a family during a time of need and grief. “We need you,” she said. “Some of us are far from home. You cannot imagine how my family is feeling to know that they have not seen me in so long and such a thing can happen. We need each and every one here. “We’ll hold hands, mourn together, cry together, share memories and just be a family,” she said. The stories from Zhang’s friends prompted both tears and laughter during the service. Paige Edmonds was Zhang’s resident assistant during her freshman year. She joked about a resident she said was both curious and warm. “She was one of those freshman that the questions you think you’re never gonna get asked as an RA, she asked them,” Edmonds said. “She was the type of resident who when you had a section event, would come knock on my door the next day and ask where everyone was. But she definitely challenged me to grow as a person. … Remember her smile.” Saint Mary’s graduate Chen Chen recalled a story she heard about Zhang before the two had even met. A mutual friend brought Zhang to pick up the keys to her dorm room on her first day at Saint Mary’s, but when they went to open the door, they had some trouble with the lock. “Ziqi just whipped out a toolkit … and started seriously working on trying to break into her room,” Chen said. “So I got really excited, and the first thing that came to my mind, I got to tell this story to Dr. Barstis, who is the engineering advisor, to let her know that we have a student who has the right engineering spirit. … That’s basically how she got to the engineering program.” Other professors and friends recalled Zhang as constantly smiling and always willing to push her limits for new experiences. They talked about an excellent student newly fascinated by philosophy and dedicated to her studies. They remembered a girl excited to return home to China over winter break for the first time since she had left for college. Notre Dame sophomore Christine Nie said she came from the same city as Zhang in China, but only met her after they came to South Bend. She remembered feeling at home hearing Zhang speak their first language with the same distinct accent as her family members and friends in China. “I thought even though she couldn’t stay in this beautiful world, as a girl of the same age and of the same city and of similar background, I can live this life for her,” she said through tears. Elaine Meyer-Lee, director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL), read an email from Zhang’s parents to Dr. Alice Yang, director for global education. Another Chinese-speaking professor had translated the letter. “We lost our precious daughter,” they wrote. “She was our pride and joy. She longed for this wonder country of America, and we wish that she could have completed her studies, learned the sciences and humanities so that she could have played a worthy role in the betterment of the entire human race.” College President Carol Ann Mooney also wore bright green as she addressed the crowd gathered in the chapel. “Each of us has lost a sister,” Mooney said. “It is terribly difficult to lose a young person with so much talent and so much promise. Ziqi’s death leaves a hole in the Saint Mary’s community.” Zhang’s family is working to obtain passports and visas to come to the United States, Mooney said. Donations to help the family with funeral and travel expenses may be sent to Karen Johnson, vice president of Student Affairs, in 175 Le Mans Hall. Checks should be payable to Saint Mary’s College and indicate in the memo line that the donation is for the Ziqi Zhang family. “For her family, this is an unspeakable grief. … Our hearts break for her parents, her sister and her good friends and family in China,” Mooney said. Student Affairs is also collecting notes for Zhang’s family at the same address. The notes will be translated and delivered to her family when they arrive in the United States. “When they arrive on our campus, we will make every effort to let them know how valued Ziqi was, what a positive contribution to Saint Mary’s she was and that she had a home here.”last_img read more

Lecture compares theology and anthropology

first_imgNotre Dame professor of theology Celia Deane-Drummond discussed the interconnections between theology and anthropology in her presentation “Evolution, Humans and Other Animals: Theology and Anthropology in Dialogue,” an installment of the Snite Museum’s Saturday Scholars series.Drummond discussed the attempts of anthropology and theology to explore the role of human agency and human interaction with the environment. She said the main concern with both fields is how they intersect in light of new discoveries in evolutionary biology.According to Drummond, both anthropology and theology need to create stronger dialogue in order to provide greater perspective regarding human nature and human agency.“I believe there are tensions here that need to be faced, and if we refuse to face them we end up merging the two areas [theology and anthropology] in a way that is not necessarily intellectually responsible,” she said.Drummond said anthropology’s focus on human and human interaction with the environment compliments theology’s focus on humanity’s relationship and identity to God.In exploring the different dimensions of human biology and human evolution, Drummond explained their relation to our actions toward our environment and our role in history. She discussed how studies centered on human-animal interaction shape both human and animal communities, and she said these studies compel theologians to expand their worldview of the human relationship to God.“Although anthropologists can describe what’s going on in these [human] communities and give us a sense of our entanglement with other creatures, how are we to think about our own human responsibility that might be in the context of such entanglement?” she said. “What is the goal of the human from a theological point of view?”Drummond  introduced the concept of “theo-drama,” a concept developed by Catholic Swiss theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar, which establishes God as a central actor in human interaction and views history in light of the “future hope.” Drummond defined theo-dramatics as the “performative understanding of who we are as humans.”Theo-dramatics is analogous to niche construction, the way in which humans shape and interact with their environment, Drummond said. The theo-dramatic view of humanity and human history provide a unique integration of theology and anthropology, she said.“[Theo-dramatics] replaces the kind of stale defensiveness between evolution and creationism that has been the mantra of so much public discourse,” she said. “It’s doing something different; it’s doing something creative by actually drawing on the science and using it in a way that is helpful.”Drummond said both anthropology and theology have created frameworks that allow people to understand their identity toward both their environment and God.“There are family resemblances between the way theologians construct their work and the way that scientists can think about our own human identity,” she said. “If we’re in touch with how the biological world works, it will actually illuminate our theology in new ways.”Tags: anthropology, Celia Deane-Drummond, Saturday Scholars, theo-drama, Theologylast_img read more

ND ranked as top-producing institution for Fulbright grants

first_imgMary McGraw Jeffrey Thibert, assistant director of national fellowships in Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), said placement on the list is a significant honor for the University, raising its profile even further among U.S. doctoral and research institutions.“The grants benefit Notre Dame by confirming the University’s commitment to internationalization and expanding our global reputation,” he said. “Notre Dame Fulbright recipients are not just representing the U.S. abroad; they are representing Notre Dame abroad as well.”Thibert said the Fulbright is a great opportunity for students for three key reasons, the first of which is its ability to allow students to deepen their engagements with a particular part of the world through an immersive academic and cultural experience.“Second, the Fulbright provides funding for work that can significantly enhance one’s professional trajectory, whether that work is graduate study, dissertation research or classroom teaching experience,” he said. “Third, receiving a Fulbright grant opens the door to a vast network of Fulbright recipients around the world, and the prestige associated with the Fulbright has been a marker of outstanding achievement for decades.”Strong applicants often have experiences in their academic or extracurricular histories that indicate an interest in the wider world and the ability to adapt to an unfamiliar cultural environment, Thibert said. These experiences may involve study or research abroad as well as participation in internationally-themed coursework or clubs.“Notre Dame students are competitive applicants for the Fulbright because the University has prioritized international engagement for undergraduates and graduate/professional students,” he said. “…Because the Fulbright U.S. Student Program is fundamentally about promoting cultural exchange through educational exchange, international engagement as a student is a key indicator that someone will be an effective representative of the U.S. abroad.”Class of 2014 alumna Deanna Kolberg, who received a Fulbright grant for the 2014-15 program, is currently working as a teaching assistant in South Korea.Hoping to one day pursue a policy job within the U.S. government, Kolberg said she sees herself contributing to foreign policy through research or ground work with the Department of State.“Korea is of huge importance for U.S. national security policy, with large numbers of military personnel protecting the border from a hostile state to the North, and lies as a hub for U.S. security in greater Asia,” she said. “I can’t think of a job in foreign policy over the next 50 years that won’t need knowledge of Korea.”Kolberg said anyone looking to apply for a Fulbright grant should take full advantage of the opportunities Notre Dame has to offer.“Don’t spend your fall break at home — apply for a Nanovic Grant,” she said. “Do research beyond what’s required of your classes. Write a senior thesis. Keep in touch with your professors.”Kolberg said she has benefited in a variety of ways as a result of joining the Fulbright community.“You’re in a group of really highly motivated internationally-minded thinkers, with plenty of opportunity to interact,” she said. “I’ve learned a whole new set of skills and patience living with a Korean host family in pretty much the middle of nowhere.”As a teacher in Korea, Kolberg said she has experienced both the joys and pains of teaching and her own Korean has slowly improved as well.“More than anything, I’m one of the few people I graduated with who can honestly say they love their job,” she said.Even when her mood wasn’t the best, Kolberg said she was uplifted when greeted by students in the hallway shouting, “We love you, Deanna!”“And you just can’t have a bad day like that,” she said. “They just won’t let you.”After her school’s graduation day last week, Kolberg said countless students told her how much they appreciated her class and how much they learned. Her next career move is now centered on returning to the United States.“I recently was accepted to the Ph.D. in political science program at the University of Michigan, which I can only think had something to do with my participation in the Fulbright program,” she said.Class of 2014 alumnus Marcus Liddell, another 2014-15 Fulbright recipient, also received an English teaching assistantship, although he currently resides in Germany, working at a secondary school teaching grades 7-12.Liddell said he decided to apply for the Fulbright grant due to his interest in education and his pursuit of a degree in German and minor in education, schooling and society.“My summer jobs had been education-related,” he said. “I had studied abroad in Germany for a semester, and I had spent a week while I was there shadowing teachers at a local high school, so I had some evidence that this was the kind of thing I’d like to be doing with or without a fellowship.”After returning from study abroad in Berlin, Liddell said he was almost fluent in German.“I felt like I needed more time in Germany to really become comfortable speaking the language, and that was something that was really important to me,” he said.Beyond that, Liddell said he already knew a little bit about education in Germany and was interested in getting a closer, first-hand look at how the system worked.“It was an easy choice from both the standpoint of improving my German and the standpoint of getting some practical experience as an educator,” he said.With about 12 to 14 lessons a week, Liddell said, for the most part, he does all the teaching. He said he spends his time outside of the classroom traveling, working in the community with sports and other activities and pursuing a research project.“I’ve started [to] run a couple after-school clubs and helped out with a number of shorter-term projects,” he said. “… When the weather gets a little nicer here, I’d like to start a small touch rugby league at my school.”Liddell said students interested in a Fulbright should consider the application process early and work with an advisor.“Decide if the things you want to do fit with what the Fulbright is offering,” he said. “If you’re a good fit in your mind, if you’re not just curious, but truly passionate, then you should consider applying.”Applications for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program are assisted in a joint effort between the CUSE and the Graduate School, Thibert said. Undergraduates interested in learning more should visit CUSE National Fellowships online at http://fellows.nd.edu, and graduate/professional students and alumni should contact Dr. Mike Westrate at [email protected]“As we send more Fulbright recipients around the world, they raise the University’s global profile, which will help us to continue to bring the best international students to the University while fostering productive international academic collaborations,” Thibert said.Tags: Fulbright, fulbright grants, fulbright scholar awards, Fulbright Scholars, Fulbright U.S. Student Program, Jeffrey T Ten students from Notre Dame were awarded Fulbright grants for the 2014-15 program, ranking the University as a top-producing institution of grant recipients.last_img read more

Saint Mary’s to perform ‘Lucky, Liar, Loser’

first_imgThis weekend, an original dramedy called “Lucky, Liar, Loser” will premiere at Saint Mary’s in Moreau’s Little Theatre beginning Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. The show, which centers on the theme of violence against women, was written and is directed by Casey Whitaker, a member of The Second City — a comedy theatre in Chicago — who is this year’s annual Saint Mary’s Margaret M. Hill visiting artist in residence.After previously coming to teach some workshops at Saint Mary’s in 2015, Whitaker said she fell in love with the Saint Mary’s community.“When I started writing this play, I reached out and we started figuring out a game plan,” she said. “The topic of the play was already established before Saint Mary’s was interested — I think it is the perfect place to display it.”Whitaker defines a dramedy as a serious and dramatic play with elements of comedy. She added that originally, she did not mean for the comedy aspect to be such a major part of the show.“Violence against women is not a laughing matter — it just crept in,” Whitaker said. “Then you think about what humor is actually used for — a lot of time it’s just a cover for what’s on the inside. That’s why we are able to find the truth so quickly, it’s because we’re broken.”She said the comedy is not meant to disrespect or offset the seriousness of the topic.“It’s more of comedic relief,” she said. “ … A lot of times the characters don’t even know they’re as funny as they are. I don’t think people will think it’s disrespectful, it’s just honest and truthful.”Whitaker had originally written the show as a short-film for the Goodman Theatre in Chicago when they requested entries for a screenplay to produce. However, the Theatre never produced any of the screenplays. Last December, Whitaker rewrote the screenplay into the current dramedy in only 48 hours.“I had carried around every single scene in my head for over a year,” she said. “This project was in my head and now it’s time to do it.”Her inspiration for writing this first came when a man broke into her bedroom two years ago. Whitaker said her boyfriend happened to be there that night to fight the intruder off, but the event stuck with her.“It kind of opened my eyes to what I already knew and how this topic is handled,” she said. “It broke my heart.”Whitaker said the nine main characters in the show are based on her personal experiences and other women who were willing to tell her their experiences.“Anyone I met who was willing to tell me their story, I listened,” she said. “It’s a tribute to all the women I have met and the women who have survived and the women who aren’t ready to talk.”Based on the experiences she had in mind, she separated the nine characters into three sections with three characters in each — the lucky, the liars and the losers — and left the characters unnamed.“The different mini themes are me wanting to understand the different ways people experience violence,” Whitaker said. “I wanted the cast and the audience to know we are all these women.”The lucky are those who say they are lucky because they have not been physically abused, but instead have possibly been emotionally abused without realizing it. The liars are those who tell themselves and others they are not victims, when they are, for various reasons.Senior Olivia Jackson said she is playing one of the liars in the show.“She’s a lawyer who is outnumbered by the men at her law firm,” Jackson said. “She has to joke around to be accepted as one of the guys, even if she doesn’t agree with what they’re saying.”Whitaker said the loser section was the trickiest section to express. The losers are those who know violence is occurring but don’t do anything about it — don’t act in the moment or don’t share their survival story.“Loser is a tricky word because it’s hard to make it not sound so negative,” she said. “The actual definition is a person or thing that is put at a disadvantage by a particular situation – so it’s a temporary thing.”Gabrielle Weldy, a junior at Saint Mary’s and the stage manager for the show, said there are cast members from Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame, Holy Cross, the South Bend Community and Fischer Dance Company.“The cast of the show has 27 people total — a large cast for the small department,” Weldy said. “That’s not including all of the contributors — costume, set, sound and lighting.”The cast members of the production have been working two months to get the show to where it is now. Jackson said Whitakers work on this show has been especially admirable for that reason.“Usually we only get to spend one weekend with the Margaret Hill visiting artist,” Jackson said. “It’s nice that we’ve gotten to spend two months learning from her.”However, Whitaker said she has gotten a lot from the cast’s contributions to the production as well.“I’m an improviser so I live by the philosophy ‘yes and’ so I am open to people’s suggestion and building as a group,” she said. “This cast had to do with a lot of the shaping and what the script had to be as the final product.”Whitaker said Hannah Fischer, the owner of Fischer Dance Company in South Bend, has especially contributed to making the show what it is.“I had written in movement sequences to the show,” she said. “I have some dance training, but I would have never been able to do what Hannah did with the dance.“There are pre-filmed elements, a shadow puppet tree, a live quartet playing all the music and this modern dance element. Hannah Fischer is choreographing the elements.”Fischer graduated from Saint Mary’s in 2011 with a major in women’s studies and dance. Only six of the cast members are from her dance company; the rest are from the community.“This show is focusing on modern dance, but I’m working with a cast that hasn’t been trained in modern dance,” Fischer said. “The whole show is a combination of modern dance, theater and everyday movements in block features that look like dance”Jackson was one of the cast members who needed to adapt to the dance element.“I’m not a dancer — I knew nothing before,” she said.“We’re also using a lot of projection and shadow puppetry which as an actor I’m not always involved with, but it’s really fascinating and I haven’t seen it before. It’s been really cool to break down genre.”On the other hand, those who have been trained in dance have experienced a new element of acting. Saint Mary’s senior Margaret Davis and first year Elyse Paul said this is their first production with an acting role.“I think it’s really interesting how Casey is incorporating dance,” Davis said. “I think it brings it together — it keeps the audience thinking.” Fischer said the dance element is essential to delivering the message to the audience.“It’s a heavy topic, so the movement itself had to be simple to deal with that very complex conversation,” she said. “The movement itself is more about the intention and where you’re looking at and who you’re responding to rather than a line or the shape of the movement.”Those who come to the show who have experienced violence should not have to worry about triggers, Whitaker said.“I can’t say for sure, but I think people are going to be pleasantly surprised with how accessible the material is,” she said. “If one is a little too close to home, there’s eight more you might feel a little more connected with.”Fischer said the style of this show is unique, especially to the South Bend community.“This show is groundbreaking for South Bend,” she said. “Work like this isn’t done in the area.”Whitaker says the end may not be happy, but it is powerful.“All I can do is start a conversation and let people know they are not alone,” she said. “The message is empowerment, I don’t think anyone will leave and feel worse than they did when they walked in.”Tags: Casey Whitaker, Lucky Liar Loser, Second City, sexual assaultlast_img read more

University opens first new school in nearly a century

first_imgKnown as the Donald R. Keough School of Global Affairs, Notre Dame’s first new school in nearly a century opened this fall.Intended for both undergraduate and graduate students, the Keough School’s website said the school is focused on advancing integral human development through research, policy and practice. After the University announced its creation in 2014, history professor R. Scott Appleby was named the Marilyn Keough dean of the school.“The Keough School is a key player in fulfilling the University’s goal of internationalization,” Appleby said in an email. “All of Notre Dame’s college and schools, as well as Notre Dame International, are active and important participants in this effort.”According to the Keough School’s website, the school, which is based in the newly-constructed Jenkins and Nanovic Halls, addresses topics such as poverty, war, disease, political oppression, environmental degradation and other threats to dignity and human flourishing.Appleby said this year the school will focus on faculty, students and global policy studies in addition to working on new programs: one for undergraduates and one in policy studies with both a presence in Washington, D.C. and a network of international experts. The Keough School’s Master program in global affairs is already teaching its first class of students who came from areas across the world.Over the next three to five years, Appleby said the Keough School plans to continue this building phase.“We will continue to build a world class international faculty, welcome hundreds of gifted graduate and undergraduate students into the School and extend our networks of engagement and influence into the worlds of applied research, policy and practice of human rights, good governance, international development, peace-building and related areas,” Appleby said.Ted Beatty, associate dean for academic affairs at the Keough School, said alongside participating in pre-existing programs managed by various institutes that will be expanded in the School, undergraduate students will eventually have the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive program of global affairs.“This program of global affairs will be a program that organizes what [students] do in their majors, supplemental majors or minors, language study, study abroad … in a way that integrates together and forms a coherent program of study,” Beatty said.The pre-existing seven institutes under the Keough School are The Center for Civil and Human Rights, the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development, the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies and the Nanovic Institute for European Studies.“One thing the Keough School does is re-organize those [institutes] together under one roof,” Beatty said. “We inherit some programs from the institutes. We’ll then build up from those and create some exciting new opportunities for Notre Dame undergraduates.”Appleby said he expects the full-fledged undergraduate program — which will aim to complement and globalize the disciplinary major — will begin with a relatively small number of students next year before growing in the coming years.“Short of enrolling in the full program, or in a supplementary major or minor in the Keough School, undergrads can also take individual courses offered by the School,” Appleby said. “In addition, there are and will be an array of extracurricular options for students, ranging from guest lectures and mini-seminars led by prominent world leaders, to applied research opportunities designed to complement regular coursework and stimulate global thinking.”After three years of “frenetic planning and recruiting” with the seven institutes and colleagues from Notre Dame’s other colleges and schools, Appleby said the Keough School received a new burst of energy upon its opening.“I am heartened but not surprised by the excitement and enthusiasm generated by the opening of the Keough School — expressions of which arrive daily from the Notre Dame family of alums and other fervent supporters, as well as from peers at other universities in the United States and around the world,” Appleby said.As for long-term goals, Appleby said he looks forward to seeing his successor leverage the resources that Notre Dame and its supporters have provided.“I’d wager that before too long, the Keough School and its faculty and graduates will be recognized as a world leader in placing human dignity at the center of every effort to build peace, heal the afflicted, stimulate economic growth and ensure education and security for the most vulnerable populations on the planet,” Appleby said.Tags: kellogg institute for international studies, Keough School of Global Affairs, Kroc Institutelast_img read more

Native American Student Association of Notre Dame protests Columbus murals

first_imgThe Native American Student Association of Notre Dame (NASAND) gathered outside the Main Building, organizing a peaceful protest of the university’s Gregori murals Monday afternoon. The aim of the organization is to obtain the University’s commitment to Native American diversity through a peaceful manner.Rosie LoVoi | The Observer Commissioned by Fr. Edward Sorin, Vatican artist Luigi Gregori painted these large murals, displayed in the Main Building. According to a statement by the University regarding the Columbus murals, Sorin wanted art that represented the Catholic spirit of the University. However, NASAND protested the misrepresentation of Columbus’ ways along with the offensive and stereotypical portrayal of Native Americans in the murals.The peaceful protest began with speeches from NASAND members, who spoke of the importance of Native American representation on campus, and was followed by a more informal forum, giving attendees the opportunity to ask NASAND students questions.NASAND president and senior Dom Acri discussed some of the problems associated with the Gregori murals. Acri talked about the University’s use of the William Faulkner quote, “The past is never dead, it is not even past,” and he said NASAND hopes to take back this sentiment and make people aware of Native American culture and significance.“In an attempt to address these understandably controversial, and what our group would even call openly marginalizing murals, we are reminded that like this quote suggests, we must recognize the past because it is still here with us,” Acri said.In addition to making students, faculty and administration aware of NASAND’s desire for greater recognition and inclusion from the University, the organization has detailed goals for greater diversification throughout the school year.Acri said the student group wants to be talked to, not talked about. NASAND wants to hold a town hall meeting regarding the status and further actions in dealing with the Gregori murals, something Acri said is strengthened by the involvement of allied members.“What we need is for people to get behind us and help our movement gain momentum,” Acri said.Among other important plans are the group’s hope to serve as a connection to the Pokagon band — the tribe whose land Notre Dame rests on. Acri said NASAND would like to assist in the recruitment of a Native American faculty and establish a Native American Studies program, bring back the Notre Dame powwow and achieve greater involvement in Notre Dame’s “Walk the Walk” event.“A diverse community strengthens Notre Dame’s mission and allows students to open their minds to new perspectives,” Acri said. “But when the only representation that we have right now is these murals, we don’t think Notre Dame is fulfilling that goal. We wanted to have this event in order to help Notre Dame achieve their mission.”Tags: Columbus murals, NASAND, Native Americans, protestlast_img read more

Lecture examines development challenges, economic prospects

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Bart W. Edes, the Asian Development Bank’s representative in North America, addresses challenges and advancements that affect developing Asian countries. He lectured in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday to promote an awareness of the Asian Development Bank’s mission, which involves reducing poverty.The ADB, Edes said, does not work the same way many other banks do. “We’re a bit of a mix between a commercial bank and a program like the United Nations Development Program,” Edes said. “Our overarching mission is not to make money and give the dividends to our shareholders but to fight poverty and promote inclusive, sustainable development in developing nations.” To this end, he said the ADB is involved in financing development all across Asia in a variety of ways, from reforming education in Nepal to implementing clean energy initiatives in the Philippines to building railways in Bangladesh to constructing infrastructure for safe water in Uzbekistan. While most of what the ADB does has to do with funding projects, its employees also conduct research on economic trends of development in Asian countries over recent years.  “In the latest estimates for 2018 for developing Asia — so not including countries such as Japan — we’re looking at about a 6.3 percent increase in gross domestic product,” Edes said.Meanwhile, the United States achieved 2.4 percent growth over the same period, Edes said. The Asian economic sector appears to be one of the most quickly growing and developing that there is, Edes said.“Asian countries are working in ever more integrated and cooperative ways,” he said. When it comes to tourism, for instance, 60 percent of Chinese travelers stay inside the region, which is incredibly important to small Asian countries with large tourism industries, Edes said. The Maldives, for example, attribute 83 percent of its gross domestic product to the tourism industry, he said. While the region is experiencing rapid economic growth and development in some areas, it is still also facing a number of challenges such as poverty, climate change — which can exacerbate monsoons, storms, mudslides and other natural phenomena common to the region — and an aging population. “Asia is among the most vulnerable areas of the world when it comes to climate change,” Edes said. “This could lead to a real humanitarian crisis. We are responding in part by doubling down on our investments on climate change mitigation.” Edes said the ADB is currently committed to putting six billion dollars into countering climate change by 2020. With longevity going up and fertility rates going down across the board in Asia, the aging population may soon create a problem in some Asian countries. Edes said. A similar trend is occurring in other countries across Asia, which could lead to economic trouble as a diminishing workforce has to work increasingly hard for a growing body of dependent citizens. “By 2030, we will have almost 30 percent of Japan’s population at an age of 65 or older,” he said. Tags: ADB, Asian Development Bank, Bart W. Edes, development, Jenkins Nanovic Hall The North American representative for the Asian Development Bank (ADB) — an institution seeking to reduce poverty in Asia and the Pacific — Bart W. Edes, spoke in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday about his experience working for the ADB for the past 16 years and the lessons he has learned about economic growth, development and challenges facing some developing Asian countries.last_img read more

Jonathan Brody & Scott Burkell Join Titanic Concert

first_imgAll aboard! Jonathan Brody and Scott Burkell will join the one-night-only concert of the Tony-winning musical Titanic at Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Hall. Brody and Burkell are set to replace the previously announced Michael Mulheren and John Jellison as John B. Thayer and George Widener/Frank Carlson, respectively. Directed by Don Stephenson and featuring original cast members Michael Cerveris and Victoria Clark amongst others, Titanic will play February 17. Based on the real-life disaster of 1912, Maury Yeston and Peter Stone’s Tony-winning musical tells the story of the doomed ocean liner and the travelers aboard the so-called unsinkable ship. The show premiered on Broadway on April 23, 1997 and won five Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Best Score and Best Book. Titanic’s score includes “Godspeed Titanic,” “The Largest Floating Object in the World” and “I Must Get On that Ship.” Michael Cerveris A separate revival directed by Thom Southerland is set to dock on Broadway this fall. View Comments The cast of Titanic will also include Brian d’Arcy James as Frederick Barrett, Martin Moran as Harold Bride, David Garrison as J. Bruce Ismay, Becky Ann Baker as Charlotte Cardoza, John Bolton as Charles Lightoller, Ryan Silverman as Charles Clarke, Ron Raines as Isidor Straus, Clarke Thorell as Jim Farrell and Jill Paice as Caroline Neville. Victoria Clark Star Files Brian d’Arcy Jameslast_img read more

Will Peter Gallagher Join Kristin Chenoweth in B’way Revival of On the Twentieth Century?

first_img View Comments The original Broadway production of On the Twentieth Century was directed by Hal Prince and opened in February 1978 at the St. James Theatre, starring John Cullum, Madeline Kahn, Imogene Coca and Kevin Kline. The musical received five Tony Awards, including Best Book of a Musical and Best Original Score. Featuring a book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green and music by Cy Coleman, On the Twentieth Century follows a down-and-out Broadway producer named Oscar Jaffee who struggles to convince his former muse and lover, now a successful film actress, to return to Broadway in a play about Mary Magdalene. While dealing with Lily Garland’s jealous new lover and a religious fanatic aboard a luxury train, Oscar hopes he can lure her back to the stage and salvage his sinking career. Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on July 19, 2015 Gallagher received a Tony nomination for his role as Edmund Tyrone in the 1986 production of Long Day’s Journey Into Night. He also appeared on Broadway in The Country Girl, Noises Off, Guys and Dolls, The Real Thing, The Corn Is Green, A Doll’s Life and Grease. Gallagher’s many film and TV credits include The O.C., Center Stage, American Beauty, To Gillian on Her 37th Birthday, While You Were Sleeping and Sex, Lies, and Videotape.center_img On The Twentieth Century Kristin Chenoweth He’s got it all! It looks like stage and screen star Peter Gallagher is ready to take the Great White Way by storm once again! According to The Los Angeles Times, the Tony nominee will be joining Tony winner Kristin Chenoweth in a forthcoming Broadway revival of On the Twentieth Century. Chenoweth recently told Broadway.com that she’s definitely “putting aside a chunk of time to be able to” play Lily Garland in the musical. Related Showslast_img read more

Some Kind of Wonderful! Beautiful Recoups on Broadway

first_img View Comments Beautiful: The Carole King Musical Related Shows In addition to Mueller, Beautiful stars Jake Epstein as Gerry Goffin, Jarrod Spector as Barry Mann and Anika Larsen as Cynthia Weil. The company also includes Jeb Brown, Liz Larsen, Ashley Blanchet, Andrew Brewer, E. Clayton Cornelious, Joshua Davis, Alysha Deslorieux, Kevin Duda, James Harkness, Carly Hughes, Sara King, Rebecca LaChance, Douglas Lyons, Gabrielle Reid, Rashidra Scott, Sara Sheperd, Yasmeen Sulieman, Daniel Torres, Melvin Tunstall and Alan Wiggins. It’s one fine day for Beautiful: The Carole King Musical. The bio-musical, capitalized at $13 million, has become the first new tuner of the 2013-2014 season to recoup. Starring 2014 Tony winner Jessie Mueller in the title role and directed by Marc Bruni, the production is currently running at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre. Featuring songs written by Gerry Goffin, Carole King, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil and a book by Douglas McGrath, Beautiful tells the story of King from her early days as a Brooklyn teenager (named Carol Klein) struggling to enter the record business to her years spent as a chart-topping music legend. Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 27, 2019last_img read more

Mazel Tov! Our Five Favorite High School Productions of Fiddler

first_img View Comments The RICHest “Rich Man” We searched from sunrise to sunset for our favorite high school Tevyes, and Wesley David Toledo in the 2011 Christ Presbyterian Academy (you read that right) production in Tennessee gets top marks. He starts off relatively subdued, and grows increasingly animated throughout the signature number. How else can you “cheep,” “quack,” or “ya ha deedle deedle bubba bubba deedle deedle dum”? Happy Fiddler week! L’Chaim! L’shanah tovah, all, and mazel tov to Fiddler on the Roof on its 50th anniversary! In honor of the momentous occasion, we’ve been bringing you all things Fiddler this week: from crazy facts, to Fran Drescher as Fruma Sarah to some Yiddish rapping, to Tevyes around the world. Now, we’re grabbing our backpacks and going back to school. Check out our favorite high school renditions of “Tradition,” “Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” “If I Were a Rich Man” and more below. And start rehearsing your bottle dance, because Fiddler is aiming a Great White Way return in the 2015-16 season! Best Ensemble How many times in high school did you hear “there are no such things as small parts, only small actors,” or some variation of the sort? Well the ensemble of Summit High School’s 2008 production took that to heart, and ended up taking home the “Outstanding Chorus” award at Paper Mill Playhouse’s Rising Star Awards in New Jersey. After watching their “Tradition,” it’s clear why. The harmonies! That synchronization! Those beards! The Papa, the Mama, the son, the daughter: they’re all there.center_img Most Daring Jr. High School Production In 1969, a junior high school in Brownsville, Brooklyn put on a production of Fiddler on the Roof; a rarity, not just because the original Broadway production was still running a few miles up, but also because the cast featured predominantly black and Puerto Rican students. During a time of tensions between the African American and Jewish divide in the neighborhood, the students proved that the ideas of soul, community and yes, tradition, are universal. Take a look at a 60 Minutes segment on the production. Freakiest Fruma Sarah Dry ice? Check. Spooky lighting? Check. Rolling in on a giant contraption and wheeled around the stage? Check and check. Here’s Amy Rachel as the butcher’s first wife in Salem Hills High School’s 2011 production in Utah, complete with all the crazy vibrato and head voice you could ever ask for. Sure, the makeup is half Fiddler and half Cats, but that kind of makes her Frumah Sarah all the more terrifying. The Daughters! The Daughters! Tradition! The Class of 2007 girls of New Canaan High School in Connecticut are looking for someone interesting, well-off and important. Fans of belting a plus. We were hooked once we heard this Hodel’s little scoop on “Find me a find.” And props to the pint-sized Tzeitel’s hilarious Yente impersonation. And why not throw Shprintze and Bielke into the mix? More harmony!last_img read more

Culturalist Challenge! Which Broadway Musical Mom Is Your Favorite?

first_img View Comments The Broadway.com staff is nuts about Culturalist, the website that lets you choose and rank your own top 10 lists. Every week, we’re challenging you with a new Broadway-themed topic to rank—we’ll announce the most popular choices on the new episode of The Broadway.com Show every Wednesday.Last week, we asked you to name the Broadway star you were rooting for on Tony nomination morning. The results are in, and fans picked The King and I star Kelli O’Hara! Your good vibes worked, and O’Hara nabbed her sixth nomination on April 28. This week, Mother’s Day is just around the corner, so we want to know: Who is the ultimate mom in a Broadway musial? We narrowed down the choices to 25 of our favorites. Broadway.com Features Editor Lindsay Champion posted her list of top 10 picks here!STEP 1—SELECT: Visit Culturalist to see all of your options. Highlight your 10 favorites and click the “continue” button.STEP 2—RANK: Reorder your 10 choices by dragging them into the correct spot on your list. Click the “continue” button.STEP 3—PREVIEW: You will now see your complete top 10 list. If you like it, click the “publish” button. (If you don’t have a Culturalist, you will be asked to create one at this point.)Once your list is published, you can see the overall rankings of everyone on the aggregate list.Pick your favorites, then tune in for the results on the next episode of The Broadway.com Show!last_img read more

Tix Now On Sale for Marcy Lovitch’s Office Politics Off-B’way

first_imgTickets are now available for Marcy Lovitch’s Office Politics. Directed by Aimee Todoroff, the new play will begin previews on June 5 at off-Broadway’s June Havoc Theatre and officially open on June 11.The cast will feature Patrice Bell (Six of One), Josh Doucette (Irreversible), Philip Guerette (American Genius), Carson Lee (The Water Children), Molly Lovell (And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little), Maria Wolf (The Balcony) and Nicholas De Sibio (Working Out with Leona).In Office Politics, when a white male co-worker makes an off-the-cuff racially insensitive remark to his boss’s black female assistant, what seems like a harmless joke snowballs, suddenly catapulting the ad sales office of a women’s magazine into turmoil. Threats are made, loyalties tested and contrasting beliefs about power, race and class surface, resulting in shocking reveals, lies and accusations, ultimately leaving their department in utter shreds. View Commentslast_img read more

Melody Betts on Touring the Country with The Sound of Music

first_imgMelody Betts in ‘The Sound of Music'(Photo: Matthew Murphy) View Comments In the final moments of The Sound of Music’s first act, Melody Betts takes center stage as Mother Abbess as she delivers the last verse of “Climb Ev’ry Mountain” with a pure, commanding soprano. Before taking on the classic Rodgers and Hammerstein musical in the current North American tour, Betts had audiences giving mid-show standing ovations as a featured soloist in Invisible Thread off-Broadway. Below, the unforgettable performer talk to Broadway.com about bringing her own faith to the stage, feeling inspired by Audra McDonald and her secret off-stage riffing.Hi, Melody! How’s touring life treating you?It’s good! I thought it was going to be difficult, but it’s not as bad as I thought it was going to be. I’m finding my way around. The hardest thing is probably laundry.How did the opportunity to play this role arise? They were looking for another Mother Abbess as Ashley Brown was pregnant, and my manager said, “I think you should go in.” Now, I’m thinking there’s no way. The Sound of Music is traditionally cast all white. For me to come in, I thought, was a huge adjustment for the audiences. But I decided, “What the heck?” I caught up with my friend Matt Gould [co-writer of Invisible Thread], we had some voice lessons, and then I went in.What was the audition process like? It was really great. I was the only one who looked like me in the room, which was intimidating. But by the end of it, we were all in tears. I was hoping I would have the job by the end of that. But I left, and by the time I got off the bus, I got the phone call.Did seeing Audra McDonald play the role on NBC provide any comfort or assurance? Absolutely. If I ever get the chance, I’d love to thank her. I’m a huge advocate for respect and love to the ones who have gone before me. It meant a whole lot that Audra did the role, and that she did it so beautifully; that allowed people to see that a woman of color could do this. She is one of the reasons why I could be put in this place.I know faith is an important part of your life. How does that inform your performance as the Mother Superior? It makes it a lot easier. As myself, I’m always tapping into my relationship with God, so I’ve added that to my performance. You’ll see me [on stage] actually taking a moment to ask God what to do next. I’ll look up, have an internal prayer and actually thank the Lord for the answers. I know what it’s like to come to a decision of whether or not I’m going to follow God.You also played a religious figure in Invisible Thread. In both, your character goes against what others in the church community might expect. Is that something you relate to personally? I think Christians get a bad rep because there are people in the world who claim Christ but forget that when Christ walked the earth, He hung out with everybody. Sometimes when people become Christians, they focus on the legalism of it instead of the love. There has to be a balance. The world is in need of love.That certainly rings true in both performances. One of the major differences, though, is your vocal style. In Invisible Thread, you belted up a storm. Here, it’s all classical. How do you find the balance between the two types of singing? When I hit the stage, I sing classically. When I’m singing backstage, I riff. I have to keep that part of my voice active. I started out singing in the church, and that’s where you learn that riffing. But I actually trained classically, too. Even though I don’t use that part of my voice that much, it’s in my bag of skills. I was able to go back into my bag and dust that off. And yes, there was some dust collecting!What’s your earliest memory of The Sound of Music? Like most people, Julie Andrews in the movie. It was always “My Favorite Things.” There was something about that song that always made me happy. I remember as a child singing those lyrics just out of the blue sometimes.And unlike the movie version, you’re the one who gets to sing it. Exactly! Now I know the real words; I don’t have to make them up.Representation and diversity are integral to this Broadway season, and hopefully that’s not just a trend. What does it mean for you to be a part of that this year off-Broadway and on tour? I’m so elated. I’m not going to be at the Tonys or anything like that, but I am a part of theater at this time. That alone is everything. Right now, Hollywood is not making the mark when it comes to acknowledging people of color. In theater, it’s a different feeling. I’m proud of the theater community for stepping up. That’s exactly what we need.Do you find that that resonates with audiences across the country? I realize there are a lot of little people who look like me–or some form of me–out in the audience. Even if they don’t want to be an actor, I just need them to know that whatever it is they’re looking toward, it’s possible. I grew up in the hood of Chicago. I was discouraged and was told my future wasn’t very bright. That was a lie, and now I’m living the truth. You don’t have to be left to despair and doubt. You can believe and work hard, and you can see all your dreams come true. You have the power to make that happen. That’s why I’m here.last_img read more

Oslo to Transfer to Broadway

first_img The acclaimed off-Broadway production of J.T. Rogers’ Oslo, headlined by Tony winners Jennifer Ehle and Jefferson Mays, will transfer to the Main Stem next spring. Helmed by Tony winner Bartlett Sher, the show, which is currently playing at Lincoln Center Theater’s Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, will move to LCT’s larger (and thus Broadway eligible) venue, the Vivian Beaumont Theater, beginning previews on March 23, 2017. Opening night is set for April 13.The Vivian Beaumont Theater incarnation of Oslo will feature the production’s original cast. Along with Ehle and Mays, the company includes Michael Aronov, Anthony Azizi, Adam Dannheisser, Daniel Jenkins, Dariush Kashani, Jeb Kreager, Jefferson Mays, Christopher McHale, Daniel Oreskes, Angela Pierce, Henny Russell, Joseph Siravo and T. Ryder Smith.A darkly comic epic, Oslo tells the true but until now untold story of how one young couple, Norwegian diplomat Mona Juul (Ehle) and her husband social scientist Terje Rød-Larsen (Mays), planned and orchestrated top-secret, high-level meetings between the State of Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization, which culminated in the signing of the historic 1993 Oslo Accords. Featuring dozens of characters and set in locations across the globe, Oslo is both a political thriller and the personal story of a small band of women and men struggling together—and fighting each other—as they seek to change the world.The production will once again have sets by Michael Yeargan, costumes by Catherine Zuber, lighting by Donald Holder and sound by Peter John Still.Oslo will run off-Broadway through August 28. Jennifer Ehle & Jefferson Mays in ‘Oslo'(Photo: T. Charles Erickson) Related Shows Star Files Jefferson Mayscenter_img Oslo Show Closed This production ended its run on July 16, 2017 View Commentslast_img read more

Odds & Ends: Cynthia Erivo Honors Gene Wilder & More

first_img View Comments Tony Winner Mel Brooks Reflects on Gene WilderThe Producers mastermind Mel Brooks appeared on The Tonight Show on August 30, and of course, he discussed his Young Frankenstein partner and Producers film star Gene Wilder. “He was sick, and I knew it. And he was such a dear friend,” Brooks told Jimmy Fallon. “I expected it. But I’m still reeling from that no more Gene…He was such a wonderful part of my life.” Want to hear the story of how these two comedy kings met? Check out the interview below! Michael Shannon & Taylor Kitsch to Star in WacoLast seen on Broadway in Long Day’s Journey Into Night, 2016 Tony nominee Michael Shannon is heading to the small screen alongside The Normal Heart star Taylor Kitsch. The television series focusing on the 1993 siege in Waco, Texas is currently being developed by the Weinstein Company, according to Deadline. Shannon will portray the role of FBI heavy-hitter Gary Noesner to Kitsch’s David Koresh, the leader of the Branch Davidians, a religious group that was holed up in a compound for several months. (Glad to see Shannon is taking on additional “happy-go-lucky” projects.)Daphne Rubin-Vega, Ayad Akhtar & More to Judge ObiesAward season already?! Nah, we just happen to know who will be judging the 62nd annual Obie Awards. The American Theatre Wing and The Village Voice have announced that longtime Obie Judges Chair Michael Feingold will be joined by Obie-winning actress Daphne Rubin-Vega, Obie and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Ayad Akhtar, Entertainment Weekly theater critic Melissa Rose Bernardo, Obie-winning actress J. Smith Cameron, Obie-winning actor-singer Darius de Haas and Village Voice theater critic Miriam Felton-Dansky to form the 2016-2017 judges panel. (Question: can Daphne wear her leopard print coat from Rent? Nothing says “official” like a leopard print coat.)Javier Muñoz Speaks at NYU Welcome WeekSchool is back in session, and some very lucky New York University students were able to get some tips from Alexander Hamilton himself. Hamilton frontman (and NYU alum) Javier Muñoz took the podium for the university’s Presidential Welcome. “There’s dollar pizza everywhere,” he said. This Founding Father is definitely speaking college students’ language. Take a look at the fun video below! Cynthia Erivo(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed from today. Cynthia Erivo Defies ExplanationWanna change the world? There’s nothing to it for The Color Purple Tony winner and certified runner Cynthia Erivo. She posted a touching tribute to Gene Wilder, who passed away on August 29 at the age of 83. Her take on “Pure Imagination” from Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory is beautiful, and it’s here. Watch below!last_img read more

Falsettos’ Andrew Rannells on Being ‘Midwestern Dirty’

first_img View Comments Stage and screen star Andrew Rannells is returning to the Great White Way in Falsettos this fall. As a fan of the 1992 production, Rannells recently stopped by The Late Show to tell Stephen Colbert how excited he is to celebrate unlikely love alongside Broadway faves like Christian Borle and Stephanie J. Block. However, he definitely won’t forget his “dirtier” roots in works like The Book of Mormon and HBO’s Girls. “During Mormon, we were wondering: ‘I don’t know if the middle of the country’s gonna go for this.’ And Trey [Parker] would be like ‘Well, I’m from the Midwest. Rannells is from the Midwest. That’s where all the dirty people are from.'” Whether he’s playing delightfully dirty, squeaky clean, or anywhere in between, we’re glad to have Rannells back on Broadway. Watch the hilarious interview below, and catch Falsettos at the Walter Kerr Theatre beginning September 29! Related Shows Falsettoscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 8, 2017 Andrew Rannellslast_img read more

Judy Kuhn Will Join Cast of Fiddler on the Roof

first_img Fiddler on the Roof View Comments Related Shows Judy Kuhncenter_img Tony nominee Judy Kuhn will step into the Broadway revival of Fiddler on the Roof, taking over for Jessica Hecht as Golde beginning November 22. The revival, helmed by Bartlett Sher and starring Danny Burstein, will play its final performance at the Broadway Theatre on December 31.Kuhn earned her fourth Tony nomination for her performance as Helen Bechdel in Fun Home, which concluded its Broadway run on September 10. She also received nominations for She Loves Me—Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick’s predecessor to Fiddler—Les Miserables and Chess. Her additional Broadway credits include The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Rags and King David on stage and the singing voice of Pocahantas in the 1995 Disney animated film.In addition to Hecht and Burstein, the current cast of Fiddler on the Roof includes Alexandra Silber as Tzeitel, Samantha Massell as Hodel, Melanie Moore as Chava, Adam Kantor as Motel, Ben Rappaport as Perchik, Nick Rehberger as Fyedka, Adam Dannheisser as Lazar Wolf, Alix Korey as Yente and Dee Roscioli as Fruma Sarah.Hecht will next appear on Broadway in the Roundabout revival of Arthur Miller’s The Price, beginning performances at the American Airlines Theatre on February 16, 2017. Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 31, 2016last_img read more

Father’s garden

first_imgBy Wayne McLaurinUniversity of GeorgiaAs Father’s Day approaches, I remember with fond affection my ownfather. He wasn’t a big man, but was very big in my eyes. Noteducated in a modern sense, he never failed to have time toanswer my thousand questions. He was never too busy to talk to uschildren.Many of the conversations came in the garden, started by aquestion.”What plant is that?””Is this bug good or bad?””Is that ready to eat?””Why are some peppers hot?””What causes tomatoes to turn red?””How big can a watermelon grow?””Can we quit now?”Railroad gardenWe always had a big vegetable garden on land we used with permission from the railroad.At 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. a passenger train passed by going toforeign places as far as we were concerned — northbound toWashington, D.C., and New York and southbound to New Orleans.We knew we weren’t going there, so we just waved at the people onthe train and showed them Southern hospitality while we wentabout our chores.Everyone had chores in the garden. One of my least favorite wasto pick squash and okra — both sticky. I was the fifth child,and now I think this chore was passed down as the older ones gotmore power and control.Okra lessonsLittle did I know then that I’d wind up getting a Ph.D. inhorticulture at Louisiana State University and do all of myresearch on okra. I reckon that garden got me geared up for life.Daddy never was into “gadgets.” We didn’t have a tractor or evena mule, just hand tools and a pushplow.Having come through World War I and the Depression and having sixchildren to support, Daddy was somewhat tight-fisted. Why haveone of those gadgets when Mr. John Scott would come over and plowthe garden with his mule Hugh?Besides the chores, we did everything else that was asked. Daddyalways asked. He never told us what to do. Of course, we neverrefused to do what he asked.That one time…Except there was that one time when my older brother V.L. decidedif he stuck his foot with a pitchfork he could get out of work –we always worked barefooted. Instead, he stuck it through his toe.Daddy took him back to the house, poured iodine on the puncture,bandaged it and made him wear shoes back to the garden. All of uslearned a lesson: don’t try it, because it won’t get you out ofgarden work.We didn’t have any of the supplies modern gardeners can’t seem todo without. We knocked pests off the plants into a coffee canwith a little kerosene in the bottom. After we were through, westrained the bugs out and saved the kerosene for the nextonslaught of insects.Specialized hoesWeed control was never a problem. We just used hoes and kept themsharpened. As the hoe heads were sharpened, of course, theybecame smaller.That was never a problem. We used the small-headed hoe to getclose around the plant. With this implement I could get rightnext to the stem and cut the grass.Woe be unto the kid, though, who cut a plant. We’d get “Son, whydidn’t you just pull the grass from around the plant with yourhands?” in the kindest of words.The newer, wider hoes were for the middles. And we never chopped.We “drew” the hoe along the top of the soil without disturbingthe soil, letting the sharp edge do the work. Chopping brought upweed seeds, the exact thing we were trying to control.Lots of lessonsWe not only planted and raised each vegetable but picked it,shelled it, helped cook it and, of course, ate everything. Theplate was never passed twice, and no one wanted to be at the end.Yet there was always enough to eat and share with others lessfortunate (or as we kids so selfishly saw it, too lazy to have agarden).As I look back, gardening with my father was one of the bestlearning experiences ever. All of the formal education I’ve gonethrough has only refined and enhanced what I learned in myfather’s garden.(Wayne McLaurin is a horticulturist with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Student success

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaWith getting children ready for school, feeding them a healthy breakfast, making sure they get home safely and taking them to practices, today’s parents have a lot on their plates.Actual schoolwork can get lost in the rush. A key to children’s success is paying attention to what goes on during the eight hours they spend at school.“I came across a recent survey in one state that said fewer than 20 percent of parents are in regular contact with their child’s school and teacher,” said Don Bower, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension human development specialist. “Nobody is happy with that.”As teachers and schools search for ways to engage their students, sometimes the one missing element is parental involvement. Eighth-grade teacher Julie Crow said the best way a parent can connect with a child’s teachers is to show up at parent-teacher conferences.“We make a lot of appointments, and I bet about 60 percent of them don’t show up,” she said.Crow teaches mathematics at East Jackson Middle School in Commerce, Ga. Parents there can also meet with teachers when they pick up their child’s report card.“It seems like a lot of parents come when their child is in sixth grade,” she said. “But by the time they get to eighth grade, not as many parents come.”When students reach middle school, Bower said, many parents tend to believe their student is more independent and responsible. In fact, parents may need to be in closer contact with their child’s teacher during these challenging years, he said.“In middle school and high school, students have issues of bigger crowds and less one-to-one contact,” he said. “Typically at the middle school level, many parents are overwhelmed with trying to meet all the teachers and keep up with what’s going on in all those classes.”Bower said a solution to the teacher overload would be for a parent to find someone at the school who knows the child and to talk to that person regularly.“The most effective systems are where both the school and the parent understand the learning goals of the student and work together to achieve those goals,” he said. “That’s done in an environment where responsibility and power are shared between the school and the parents.”Sometimes, parents doubt the necessity of parent-teacher conferences, he said.“For some, it informs them of a situation to begin with,” Crow said. “So many parents don’t know what’s happening in their kids’ lives. For some parents, the conference doesn’t do anything. For others, it goes home and lights a fire.”Bower and Crow offer these tips on what parents can do to communicate with their child’s teachers.1. Use the Web. “More than 95 percent of schools now have their own Web sites,” Bower said. “Using the Web also makes it much easier, especially for parents gone during traditional hours.” Web use could include something as common as e-mail. However, many schools now post a student’s password-protected grades and homework online.2. Call. “The old standby is telephone contact between the parent and teacher,” Bower said. “Make sure to call during the teacher’s free period if the teacher has one. Parents need to understand when it’s a good time to reach the teacher.” Teachers generally only have about an hour and a half per day to call a parent back as well as complete other projects, Crow said.3. Ask the child about homework assignments, tests and notes from the teacher. Talk to your student. “I think parents need to do more than just meet with their student’s teachers at conferences,” Crow said, “even if it’s not necessarily to talk to me more, but talking to their kids more.”last_img read more

Safety training a must

first_imgIf a BB gun is at the top of your child’s Christmas list, a Georgia 4-H gun safety expert urges you to put “target sport safety equipment” on that list, too. “As parents, we would never send our kids out to play in a little league football game without the proper protective equipment,” said Mark Zeigler, who coordinates the Georgia 4-H Shooting Awareness, Fun and Education program, or SAFE. “Target sports also require the proper protective gear, and the most important part of that gear is sound safety education.” More than 3,500 youths participate Zeigler leads the program’s certified coaches who are trained in youth development as well as shooting education and safety. SAFE coaches teach target sport safety to more than 3,500 students across Georgia. Although he didn’t have a BB gun as a child, Zeigler doesn’t discourage parents from buying one for their child. “It can be an appropriate gift when used under the supervision of an adult and if the child is taught basic firearm safety,” he said. “It’s paramount that children are properly educated first. I just can’t stress that enough.” 4-H’ers use the Daisy 499In the 1983 movie “A Christmas Story,” Ralphie longed for “an official Red Ryder, carbine action, 200-shot, Range Model air rifle with a compass on the stock and this thing which tells time.” Unlike Ralphie, Georgia 4-H’ers use the Daisy 499 model, which is specifically designed for target sports, Zeigler said. “The 499 is so specific, it can’t be bought in stores,” he said. “It was designed specifically to support shooters competing in international BB championship matches.” Learning to concentrateThough the SAFE program teaches the safety aspects of shooting sports, he says the most important thing students learn has nothing to do with sports. “Studies have shown that participating in shooting sports helps kids improve their concentration levels and their grades,” he said. “And it’s the lowest injury rate sport. In 4-H, we teach firearms safety mirrored with youth development standards and principles.” Like most 4-H activities, students can compete in target sports on the regional, state and national levels. “Although competition isn’t the goal of the program, when used correctly, competition can help young people develop life sills and positive habits they can carry through life,” Zeigler said. The Georgia 4-H target sports program is open to fifth- through eighth-grade students for BB and through high school for other shooting sports like archery, rifle, pistol and shotgun. Many training opportunities existIn addition to Georgia 4-H, target sport safety training is available through Boy Scouts, the National Rifle Association and the Department of Natural Resources Hunter Education Program. Conservation programs like Ducks Unlimited and The National Wild Turkey Federation also offer programs for youths to develop interest in shooting sports. For more information on the Georgia 4-H SAFE Program, contact your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

Biopharmaceutical Research

first_imgThe University of Georgia is partnering in a biopharmaceutical innovation institute that aims to boost market production of cell-based therapies and develop a skilled workforce to work in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry.The new public-private partnership, called the National Institute for Innovation of Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL) will focus its efforts on driving down the cost and risks associated with manufacturing advanced cell and gene therapies for biopharmaceutical production.Steven Stice, director of the UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and D.W. Brooks Distinguished Professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is the UGA lead in the partnership, which is coordinated by the University of Delaware.NIIMBL represents a total investment of $250 million, including $129 million in private cost-share commitments from the NIIMBL consortium of 150 companies, nonprofits, educational institutions and state partners across the country, combined with at least $70 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Commerce.NIIMBL is the 11th institute under the Manufacturing USA National Network for Manufacturing Innovation initiative created to advance manufacturing leadership and restore jobs to the U.S.This recent success follows an announcement in 2016 by the U.S. Department of Defense that an MIT-led team involving UGA was selected for funding as the eighth NNMI institute.“We are pleased to have UGA participate in these high-profile public-private partnerships that are aimed at advancing U.S. leadership in key manufacturing sectors,” said UGA Vice President for Research David Lee. “We are eager to assist industry partners in meeting their goals through the development of new and existing intellectual property, and the training of an appropriate workforce.”Biopharmaceuticals are increasingly showing promising results in treating some of the most prevalent and debilitating diseases affecting human health. But manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals is not without large-scale operational and technological challenges, Stice said.These biologically sourced drugs are different from traditional small molecule, synthesized drugs. For example, he said, the synthesized drug ibuprofen can be precisely copied and characterized, and result in varied generic versions. In contrast, biopharmaceuticals like vaccines are much more complex and rely on the use of a biological transformation. As living cells, they are highly sensitive to their conditions and surroundings.Technical projects, which will be designed by the industry partners of the institution, will be selected through a competitive process and funded via subaward agreements with NIIMBL members.Stice, a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, will facilitate team assembly for response to the project calls, leveraging years of collective experience in regenerative medicine and technology development. He is also co-director of the Regenerative Engineering and Medicine research center, or REM, a collaboration by Emory University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and UGA. “There is a crippling regulatory gap, which is commonly referred to as ‘the valley of death’ in moving biotech products from discovery to commercialization,” Stice said. “What NIIMBL presents is an opportunity to help improve government regulation, minimize failure, create job growth and improve health care quality, all while reducing costs in the U.S.”For more information about the role UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center plays in developing biotechnology that will shape the future visit www.rbc.uga.edu.last_img read more

Georgia 4-H pumpkin-growing contest

first_imgMore than 25 pumpkins were submitted to Georgia 4-H’s 2020 statewide pumpkin-growing contest, with the largest pumpkin, cultivated in north Georgia’s Union County, weighing in at a whopping 548 pounds.All Georgia 4-H youth were encouraged to participate by submitting one pumpkin for consideration. Participants took their entries to their local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office for weighing. This year, the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association sponsored the contest, donating prize money of $100 for first place, $50 for second place and $25 for third place.The winners of the 2020 Georgia 4-H Pumpkin Growing Contest are:Peyton Collins, Union County, 548 poundsNatalie Payne, Union County, 432 poundsAva Sharp, Union County, 316 poundsGeorgia 4-H empowers youth to become true leaders by developing necessary life skills, positive relationships and community awareness. As the largest youth leadership organization in the state, 4-H reaches more than 242,000 people annually through UGA Extension offices and 4-H facilities. For more information, visit georgia4h.org.last_img read more

SBE Inc to hold ceremonial groundbreaking in Barre Town

first_imgSBE Inc. (dba SB Electronics), will officially break ground on its new high-volume manufacturing facility on Saturday, April 17.  The groundbreaking ceremony is slated to begin at 10 am in the Wilson Industrial Park in Barre, Vermont.  Event speakers include Governor Jim Douglas, Lt Governor Brian Dubie, Representative Peter Welch, the US Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Cathy Zoi and Sam Matthews, Executive Vice President of the Central Vermont Economic Development Corporation. Earlier in the year, SBE Inc. won a matching grant of $9.1 million as the major piece of funding for an $18 million project under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Electrical Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative, part of President Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, to expand its electric car technology manufacturing.  SBE’s new manufacturing plant facility will be dedicated to the transportation market and will have capacity to produce Power Ring capacitors for over 100,000 plug-in hybrid and electric drive vehicles within 3 years.The 52,800ft2 building will be a modern, controlled environment, state of the art manufacturing facility.  By strategically planning the production floor layout to mirror the production process, SBE can reduce both wasted time and materials, and maximize efficiency.  Integrating private offices, work stations, conference rooms and a large lunch /training room, the 13,000 ft2 office space has been designed with one core value in mind: “creating an enjoyable workspace for employees”.   SBE expects to begin moving into the new facility in December 2010. SBE Inc. is a leading developer and manufacturer of film capacitor solutions that provide a much higher degree of reliability, higher power density, and simpler cooling infrastructure, in demanding applications, particularly for automotive/transportation, alternative energy, utilities, power supplies/laser and military/aerospace.  Originally a Sprague Electric Plant, SBE has been manufacturing capacitors for over 50 years producing over a billion capacitors, including the renowned Orange Drop®. The Company’s headquarters, engineering and product development center, and manufacturing operation are located in Barre, Vermont.  For more information on the company’s products, technologies and markets, visit its website at: www.sbelectronics.com(link is external).  Inquires and requests for further information, should be directed to Stephani Cook, marketing assistant, SBE Inc. at [email protected](link sends e-mail) or 8024764146.Source: SBE. 4.16.2010last_img read more

Green Mountain Coffee Roasters honored by McDonald’s

first_imgGreen Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc (NASDAQ: GMCR) was chosen from among hundreds of submissions from around the world to be included in the McDonald’s 2010 Global Best of Sustainable Supply. The Best of Sustainable Supply recognizes best practices of companies that demonstrate leadership and innovation in sustainable supply. McDonald’s first introduced Newman’s Own Organics coffee roasted by Green Mountain Coffee, part of GMCR’s family of brands, to its restaurants in New England and Albany, NY in October 2005.“This recognition affirms the importance of our efforts to seek sustainable solutions to poverty and hunger in communities around the world that supply us with coffee”GMCR was selected for its efforts to fight poverty and hunger in its coffee supply chain. In 2007, GMCR commissioned the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) to conduct one-on-one surveys with small-scale coffee farmers in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua. The survey showed that more than 67 percent of the interviewees could not maintain their normal diet from 3 to 8 months of the year. These months, known as “los meses flacos,” or “the thin months,” occur after the coffee harvest, when farmers’ earnings have been depleted and the price of food staples rises.Under the leadership of Rick Peyser, Director of Social Advocacy and Coffee Community Outreach, GMCR initiated support of projects with the goal of eliminating “los meses flacos” by helping families diversify their production and income. A coalition of nonprofit organizations and Fair Trade coffee cooperatives including Save the Children, Heifer International, Catholic Relief Services, Café Femenino, Community Agroecology Network (CAN), Pueblo a Pueblo, CECOCAFEN, and CESMACH have created a web of projects across multiple regions. Since 2007, GMCR has funded 14 projects in 10 countries, which are starting to help more than 18,000 families (over 96,000 people) develop the capacity to overcome months of food insecurity in a sustainable manner.“This recognition affirms the importance of our efforts to seek sustainable solutions to poverty and hunger in communities around the world that supply us with coffee,” said Peyser. “We believe there is a direct link between the quality of coffee we purchase and the quality of life in the farming communities that grow this coffee. As such, we are focused on supporting projects that improve the quality of life. Reducing food insecurity improves health, enhances children’s ability to learn, and provides families with new opportunities to begin lifting themselves out of poverty. When farmers and their families are unable to maintain their normal diet, they are generally not able to invest in their coffee, so this work will also help improve the quality of coffee in the cup.”The 2010 Best of Sustainable Supply was recently announced during McDonald’s 2010 Worldwide Convention and is featured on its Corporate Social Responsibilityweb site.About Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR)As a leader in the specialty coffee industry, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. is recognized for its award-winning coffees, innovative brewing technology, and socially responsible business practices. GMCR’s operations are managed through two business units. The Specialty Coffee business unit produces coffee, tea, and hot cocoa from its family of brands, including Green Mountain Coffee®, Newman’s Own® Organics coffee, Tully’s Coffee®, and Timothy’s World Coffee®. The Keurig business unit is a pioneer and leading manufacturer of gourmet single-cup brewing systems. K-Cup® portion packs for Keurig® Single-Cup Brewers are produced by a variety of licensed roasters and brands, including Green Mountain Coffee, Tully’s Coffee and Timothy’s. GMCR supports local and global communities by offsetting 100% of its direct greenhouse gas emissions, investing in Fair Trade Certified™ coffee, and donating at least five percent of its pre-tax profits to social and environmental projects. Visit www.gmcr.com(link is external) for more information.GMCR routinely posts information that may be of importance to investors in the Investor Relations section of its web site, including news releases and its complete financial statements, as filed with the SEC. GMCR encourages investors to consult this section of its web site regularly for important information and news. Additionally, by subscribing to GMCR’s automatic email news release delivery, individuals can receive news directly from GMCR as it is released.Source: WATERBURY, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–4.27.2010last_img read more

Leahy Center for Rural Students established at Lyndon State College

first_imgSource: Lyndon State. 5.18.2010 When Lyndon State College was accepted as one of five New England schools to participate in the Nellie Mae Education Foundation’s Project Compass initiative three years ago, the focus was on increasing the college retention and graduation rates of first-in-family, modest-income students (FFMI). In the midst of these efforts, project leaders discovered that there is very little information about the specific needs of and best practices in serving rural students—a surprising discovery, given that one fifth of the nation’s public school students are enrolled in rural school districts. The college also realized that there are many more students capable of pursuing a post-secondary education than those who do and that the College could best serve these students by coordinating with local PK-12 education providers to create a regional PK-16 network.Towards these ends, thanks to the efforts of Senator Patrick Leahy, Lyndon State College is pleased to announce the creation of the Patrick and Marcelle Leahy Center for Rural Students. President Carol A. Moore announced the creation of the Leahy Center for Rural Students at the College’s 2010 commencement ceremony May 16.The central question to be answered by The Leahy Center for Rural Students is what are the expectations of FFMI students relating to their education and careers and when do those expectations solidify. Many potential FFMI students never see themselves as college graduates or perhaps assume they cannot afford a college education, even when they have the potential to thrive in the college setting. It is well known that a college degree increases the lifetime earning capabilities of an individual many fold, so it is important for these students to understand the options available to them and to support the students and their families as they navigate the unfamiliar territory of pursuing a college education. President Carol A Moore presents a certificate to Marcelle and Senator Patrick Leahy naming the Patrick and Marcelle Leahy Center for Rural Students at Lyndon State College commencement Sunday, May 16, at the College.The Center for Rural Students began an in-depth longitudinal panel study this past fall under the direction of former Lyndon Prof. Rod Zwick, which will be carried on now by Center Director Heather Bouchey. The study will expand beyond the College to include students attending seven area schools that have been identified as the pilot schools in the creation of a regional PK-16 network. Ultimately, the findings of this study will inform how teachers, parents, schools administrators, business leaders and community members can work together in supporting students towards their full learning and career potential.The initial study will follow students individually and as a group from fifth grade through four years post-high school, to learn what influences a student’s decisions regarding higher education. “It is critical to understand where the college/no college decision is made,” said Zwick. “We need to help students make that decision in an informed way and encourage them to make their own individual education aspirations fit with their own future plans.”While not all careers require a four-year degree, most now need some sort of continuing education or training. While much is known about how urban students make these choices, little is known about rural, FFMI students. The Center for Rural Students will play an important role in changing that reality.On Friday June 18, The Patrick and Marcelle Leahy Center for Rural Students will be hosting a Vermont Education Summit at Lyndon State College for educators and community leaders from across the state to discuss how we can work together at the local and state level to help every Vermont student achieve their full potential along the PK-16 spectrum. This conference is being sponsored by AT&T. For more information, contact Heather Bouchey at 802-626-6444 or [email protected](link sends e-mail).last_img read more

Vermont business expands national recycling programs

first_imgBrattleboro based business, Recycle Away has increased recycling at over200 corporations, universities and municipalities in the past 18 months.Recycle Away (www.recycleaway.com(link is external)) assists corporations such as Google,Hewlett Packard, Quaker Oats and Kellogg in ordering specialty containersfor corporate-wide recycling programs. Champlain College in Burlington VTrecently purchased several systems designed to serve a newly constructedLEED Certified student center. In October 2010 the State University of NYMedical Center dispersed hundreds of Recycle Away containers around campusand hospital floors.Municipalities around the country are stepping up recycling efforts onmain streets and city parks. Skagit County, WA, Galveston, TX andBrattleboro VT are three examples of communities with proudly printed logoson their public recycling systems; showcasing efforts to keep city blocksclean. Bins glazed in community colors, imprinted with personalized logos andclear signage are replacing retro-blue bins of the 90’s. Indoor andoutdoor containers alike are being used to brand champion recycling effortsin city parks, corporate settings, and commercial facilities.Recycle Away owner, Michael Alexander has spent the last 20 yearsanalyzing and writing policy for recycling agencies. He was a researchassistant for the National Recycling Coalition in Washington DC and aconsultant for the industry. He brings an understanding of the economicand environmental benefits’ recycling has for cities, states andorganizations.Alexander realizes that Americans generate 300 billion bottles and canseach year, most of which are disposed of away from home. Alexandertherefore built his business with the goal of collecting a substantialportion of those disposable beverage containers. ‘The need for public space recycling is gigantic,’ explainsAlexander. ‘Basically, everywhere there is a trash canâ ¦there should bea recycling container’. Recycle Away is on their way to making thathappen.Bring attractive and effective recycling systems to your business orcommunity. Visit www.recycleaway.com(link is external) or contact Michael Alexander at Source: Recycleaway. 2.8.2011last_img read more

Dynamic Survey Solutions sold to California’s Trimble

first_imgDynamic Business Solutions, Inc,Trimble (Nasdaq: TRMB) today announced that it has acquired seismic survey software provider Dynamic Survey Solutions, Inc of Essex. The acquisition is expected to expand Trimble’s presence in the seismic survey industry. Financial terms were not disclosed.Dynamic Survey Solutions’ GPSeismic suite of software applications are designed specifically for the seismic survey industry to process and manage data. The applications run on the Windows XP, Vista, and 7 operating systems (both 32 and 64 bit). GPSeismic supports more than 50 types of survey instruments ranging from GPS to inertial and conventional survey systems and offers a comprehensive set of tools for the land seismic surveyor. The software suite is used worldwide by geophysical contractors, seismic survey companies, oil companies and survey audit companies.”Our success has been attributed to the feedback we’ve received from our clients over the past 18 years. Supporting a broad range of survey systems in use has given us the ability to work with an extremely diverse client base. With the acquisition, this aspect of our business will not change,” said Cliff Harris, founder and president of Dynamic Survey Solutions. “As part of Trimble we will have an opportunity to apply our industry knowledge beyond office software to field operations.””The addition of GPSeismic gives Trimble the opportunity to build a seamless platform where all aspects of the seismic surveying workflow are provided and supported by one organization,” said Anders Rhodindirector of Trimble’s Survey Business. “Combining the strength of the Trimble survey product portfolio and the superior seismic software from Dynamic Survey Solutions will result in an advanced solution for the seismic survey market, both in data collector functionality and GPSeismic integration.”The business will be reported as part of Trimble’s Engineering and Construction segment.About Dynamic Survey Solutions, Inc.Founded in 1993, Dynamic Survey Solutions, Inc. is the leader in seismic survey software. Its principal product, GPSeismic, represents a suite of data processing and management tools that has grown in step with the development of new survey technologies and geophysical requirements in the oil and gas exploration sector. GPSeismic’s leadership in this field is the result of a fundamental philosophy of quickly responding to the needs of the client by a programming staff with extensive experience in both geophysics and survey.For more information, please visit:  www.gpseismic.com(link is external).About TrimbleTrimble applies technology to make field and mobile workers in businesses and government significantly more productive. Solutions are focused on applications requiring position or location’including surveying, construction, agriculture, fleet and asset management, public safety and mapping. In addition to utilizing positioning technologies, such as GPS, lasers and optics, Trimble solutions may include software content specific to the needs of the user. Wireless technologies are utilized to deliver the solution to the user and to ensure a tight coupling of the field and the back office. Founded in 1978, Trimble is headquartered inSunnyvale, Calif.For more information, visit Trimble’s Web site at:  www.trimble.com(link is external).Certain statements made in this press release are forward looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements involve risks and uncertainties, and actual events and results may differ materially from those described in this news release. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, Trimble’s ability to successfully integrate and expand the GPSeismic product offerings, provide a seamless platform for seismic survey workflow and maintain commercial relationships with customers and other third parties. Additional risks and uncertainties include: the risks inherent in integrating an acquisition; unanticipated expenditures, charges or assumed liabilities that may result from the acquisition; and retaining key personnel. More information about potential factors which could affect Trimble’s business and financial results is set forth in reports filed with the SEC, including Trimble’s quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and its annual report on Form 10-K. All forward looking statements are based on information available to Trimble as of the date hereof, and Trimble assumes no obligation to update such statements.SOURCE Trimble. SUNNYVALE, Calif., May 16, 2011 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more