Blogs

Dawn cuts fat and salt in concentrate

first_imgDawn Foods’ (Evesham, Worcs) new concentrate is 97% fat free with a sodium content of less than 300mg per 100g serving.The concentrate requires the addition of flour, sugar and water, and can be used with inclusions, says Dawn. Inclusions need to be fat free so as not to compromise the total fat content of the finished product, it adds. The concentrate produces a soft muffin without the ‘rubbery’ mouthfeel often associated with low-fat products, says the company.Dawn’s premium Adore range of individually wrapped muffins includes a triple chocolate and a blueberry and redcurrant muffin. The company offers a selection of muffin sizes from mini muffins to the jumbo muffin. New flavours include lemon and sultana, oat bran and raisin, and raspberry and apple.To enable bakers to put their own signature on the basic products a semi-finished ‘Scoop and Bake’ muffin batter can hold a whole range of inclusions, says the company. It is available in vanilla, double choc, blueberry and blackcurrant and raspberry varieties.last_img read more

Degree course for Irish National Bakery School

first_imgThe Irish National Bakery School is finalising details of a new degree course for the next academic year, writes Ann Marie Foley. It is also advertising short bakery courses for chefs in Ireland’s top catering magazine. This follows the popularity of last year’s short courses among people from small catering and café businesses. “This year we decided to target hotels, on the basis that many are now using frozen bought-in product. I believe it is often the same and not of top quality,” said Derek O’Brien, head of the National Bakery School. He explained chefs tend not to tackle bread-making but that the three-day course can be tailored to their needs. “In America, they offer what they call signature bread, which is specific to a restaurant or hotel. Avoca in Bray makes its own bread and you cannot get it anywhere else. So that is what we are suggesting.” The school’s full-time two year Higher Certificate course will be extended by a year to become a degree course. However, students who want to leave after the two years will still receive the Higher Certificate. The degree course is aimed at technicians and technologists and those entering the bakery industry but also the wider food industry, such as delis and cafés that offer their own bread andbakery products. The school also offers four part-time courses that are continually full: Professional Baking – Bread; Cake; Fruit Bread; and Pastry. These and other short courses receive Continuing Professional Development (CPD) qualifications under the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) of which the Bakery School is part. While the school once catered for all bakery training in Ireland, enterprise-led support body Skillnets now offers workplace courses. The DIT and all its schools such as the bakery are to move to a new Dublin location during the next few years.last_img read more

viewpoint

first_imgAll through the summer I kept receiving offers from my gas company to sign a two-year deal for a fixed gas price, which would allegedly guard me against any price increases. Being a naturally suspicious person all I could think of was ’what’s in for them?’There were rumours that gas prices would fall and as I would rather believe a rumour than a utility company, I did not sign. Well, as predicted prices have plunged (pg 5). Not that you are seeing the benefit yet. And I am sure they will think of reasons to temper reductions. I expect to see phrases such as ’guarding against the volatility of the market’ or ’demand is keeping prices high’. Yes, greed has the same effect.This week I asked Bev Hughes, MP for Stretford and Urmston, Greater Manchester, to give her view of the Northern Foods bakery closure at Trafford Park where 690 jobs are going. The bakery falls within her constituency and she has been talking to the people affected (pg 11).She makes a point that successive Tory and Labour governments have ignored – “manufacturers cannot sustain current downward pressure on prices without serious impact on jobs and pay”.On the other hand, while governments support supermarkets charging consumers low prices, the supermarkets are inevitably going to keep as much of that low price for their own profit, especially when they are competing so hotly against each other and their results are under such intense scrutiny by the national press, not to mention their shareholders.The government and the Office of Fair Trading must decide: do they want a Supermarket Code of Practice with any teeth or do they want to listen to the heavy lobbying of the British Retail Consortium (BRC), which represents the supermarkets, and continue to do nothing? And MPs, with the exception of Bev Hughes who speaks honestly, must stop wearing two hats on this issue, nodding duplicitiously to both manufacturers and the BRC. There should be enough profit for everyone to make a decent living.Also in this issue Igor Bekaert take us step by step into making a delicious chocolate cake with healthy profit margins (pg 21). And BHS joins the coffee shop boom (pg 14) – with sandwiches made from scratch!last_img read more

Eurobake

first_imgThe Kemper Twin Star by bakery equipment integrator Eurobake (Bolton, Lancashire), is a flexible, two-row, fully automatic dough dividing and moulding machine that can produce round, long-moulded and folded rolls.Suitable for a one-man operation, the Twin Star can produce between 1,600 and 3,000 pieces an hour. The Twin Star is available in either table- or stand-mounted and wheeled versions. The moulding belt can be extended to 80cm, which can be a great help when depositing manually, says the firm.last_img read more

Warburtons to build £45m bakery in Bristol

first_imgWarburtons is to invest £45m in a new ’super-bakery’ in Bristol. The new plant is to be built on a 12 acre site at the Western Approach Distribution Park at Severn Beach, and forms part of the company’s national expansion programme.The new bakery, currently in the early stages of building, is expected to be completed and fully operational by December 2008. It will be Warburtons’ 14th bakery and will further open up distribution to multiples, convenience stores and other retail outlets. It will also enable the production of a wider range of products for distribution to Wales and the South West.Once work is completed, the site will employ around 450 people and will enable the production of 1.5m products each week with its state-of-the-art machinery.“This is one of our biggest investments to date and reinforces our commitment to the South West,” said chairman, Jonathan Warburton. “We opened our Welsh bakery in Newport two years ago but we still need more capacity to meet increasing consumer demand.”last_img read more

In the market for… five-a-day

first_imgEncouraging consumers to eat five portions of fruit and veg a day is a big part of the food industry, writes Wayne Caddy. For consumers, the five-a-day concept makes sense and is easy to understand. Given this, can the baker target incremental sales with products specifically designed for achieving one of your five-a-day?Super fruity orange and raisin muffinThis muffin recipe is typical of a healthier product without any compromises on indulgence.IngredientsHeat-treated cake flour 1,000gBaking powder 60gSalt 20gRapeseed oil 480gEgg 480gOrange pulp with zest 760gHoney 760gRaisins 880gMethod1. Sieve all dry ingredients and weigh into a mixing bowl. Using a beater attachment, mix the dry ingredients until they are evenly combined.2. Add all the liquids to the bowl and mix for 2 minutes on first speed. Scrape down.Top tip: ensure the honey is weighed out last. The oil will stop the honey sticking to the sides of the container.3. Now mix on second speed for 3 minutes. Scrape down and mix in the raisins on first speed for around 30 seconds or until evenly dispersed.4. Deposit into large muffin case (120g). Alternatively, use a lined loaf cake tin.5. Add 5g of the orange pulp and zest.6. Bake at 200?C for 25 minutes or until golden brown.7. Brush with a little runny honey.Top tip: I discovered a great tinned orange and zest pulp supplied by Treelinks Ingredients – basically an unsweetened pulp packed with chunky zest. If you use freshly squeezed orange and grated zest, then I would recommend reducing the honey level accordingly to balance out the increased sweetness.I have based some of my research on the following sites. I found the NHS five-a-day site particularly useful:[http://www.5aday.nhs.uk]tinyurl.com/56gkw6[http://www.treelinks.net]Also, check out the FSA guidance to compliance version 1 April, 2008, based on European regulation No. 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on foods.[http://www.foodstandards.gov.uk]last_img read more

From parliament to parlour

first_imgHealthy eating has become a priority for both consumers and governments. Initiatives such as the Change4Life programme and the Food Standards Agency’s (FSA) plan to reduce saturated fat intake are current examples of the shift towards better-for-you consumption. In reducing saturated fat intake by around 20%, the FSA hopes to reduce deaths related to cardiovascular disease by 3,500 a year. On average, 6% of saturated fat in the UK diet comes from biscuits, buns, cakes, pastries and fruit pies (see table). So reformulation of bakery products presents manufacturers with an opportunity to contribute towards the reduction targets.At a recent presentation at the British Society of Baking Conference, Steve Knapton, regional sales manager for ADM Trading (UK), presented a paper by colleague Jo Bruce on how the industry could reduce saturated fat levels in baked goods, with minimal impact on product and processing characteristics. He also showed how more radical reductions may be achieved in applications such as shortcrust pastry, giving significant consumer benefits.== Options for bakers ==Many bakery applications, such as cakes, short pastry, biscuits and crèmes, are made using cake margarines or all-purpose shortenings. Options currently available in the UK offer a wide range of saturated fat levels, so the challenge for bakers is deciding which product will work for them. At its new purpose-built bakery applications testing lab in Purfleet, Essex, ADM has conducted extensive trials to assess the relative performance of sat fats in a number of products. The trials showed the extent to which fats can emulsify and stabilise flour and water during mixing and baking cakes. An effective fat helps to create a large-volume cake with an even crumb structure and a moist texture, without damp streaks or ’palate cling’ when eating. It also shows how lower saturated fat shortenings can stabilise batters as well as, or better than, those with higher saturated fat levels.Changing from shortenings with around 41% saturated fat to an ingredient containing 35% saturates, for example, would provide a 14% reduction in the saturated fat content without reducing performance. Changing from ADM’s Pura Shortening Low Trans (35% saturates) or competitor equivalents, to NovaLipid shortening gives a further 14% reduction. Extensive testing in sweet and savoury shortcrust pastry, cakes, crèmes, dough fats and other applications using this shortening shows that reducing saturated fat to 30% (in the shortening) retains excellent performance.== Fluid response ==For larger manufacturers, an efficient and cost-effective way of minimising saturated fat is by using fluid shortenings. These are pumpable, semi-liquid fats with different physical properties to boxed all-purpose shortenings. In applications such as shortcrust pastry and cakes, they can be an effective alternative to solid fats. Well-processed fluids have many separate tiny crystals of fat suspended in a liquid oil medium. These small solid crystals pack tightly around air or water droplets, stabilising them in the batter or dough during baking, while the liquid oil disperses rapidly and gives a pleasant rich texture. In a solid fat, much larger crystals of fat are thought to surround the air or water droplets, so more solid saturated fat is needed to achieve the same functionality as a fluid.It is important to have enough solid fat in a fluid shortening to provide the quantity of crystals needed for optimum functionality. This must be balanced with the need for pumpability and temperature tolerance. Special physical processing techniques allow fluid shortenings to feature all these attributes with lower levels of saturated fat than solid shortenings – in ADM’s case, 26% and 18% respectively for NovaLipid fluid shortening and NovaLipid Ultra fluid shortening. Samples of the fluid shortenings have been shown to maintain their fluid, flowing properties for over a year when stored in optimum conditions. In a factory environment, even with variable temperatures, they are also extremely stable.Fluid shortenings are not only highly functional with a lower level of saturated fat, but also enable food manufacturers to reduce overall fat usage by 10-20%. This is because of the high level of liquid oil, which provides rapid and effective dispersion, making pastries shorter than usual. Fluids are usually supplied by tanker, so they are more suitable for large manufacturers with their own tanks. The fluid is then pumped around the factory minimising manual handling and packaging waste.—-=== FSA consultation ===In July, the FSA launched a consultation on saturated fat reduction to the public, suggesting clear targets for saturated fat reductions in a range of bakery products. Cakes, shortcrust and puff pastry applications are all targeted with a 10% reduction by 2012. Consultation documents can be downloaded from www.food.gov.uk. Companies have until 3 November to respond.—-=== Covering all the bases ===Puff pastries, Danish pastries and other laminated fat applications are being targeted as part of the FSA’s saturated fat reduction plan. Small changes could be achieved by using lower saturated fat, all-purpose, or fluid shortenings as the dough fat, but most of the saturated fat is contained in the laminating fat.Unlike all-purpose shortenings, there is little variation in the saturated fat content of laminating fats available in the UK. This type of product must contain high levels of solid fat to maintain separate discrete layers of dough, without creaming and mixing in. One option to reduce the saturated fat content would be to add less fat, but this would affect the amount of lift the pastry achieves. Another option is to reduce the fat level in the margarine.Tests with a pastry containing 33% saturated fat, a reduction of 19% on standard 41% saturated fat products, show that using a lower saturated fat blend and a lower level of total fat in the laminating fat achieves pastry with the same lift, eating properties and ingredients list as a standard puff pastry margarine.last_img read more

Raven Patisserie plans for growth

first_imgEssex-based cake and dessert manufacturer Raven Patisserie has moved to a new purpose-built production site in Witham.The new premises have been designed to accommodate its “ambitious sales targets for its patisserie and bakery products”, according to the firm. Operations director Daren McGrath said the business plans to achieve the growth through “new markets from within the group, and new business from a widening geographical area”.A subsidiary brand of Wilkin & Sons Limited, Raven Patisserie, previously located in Braintree, has grown steadily over the last couple of years. Wilkin & Sons, known for manufacturing Tiptree fruit conserves, acquired cakes tray-bake and bar manufacturer Passionately Cakes in 2003. Passionately then joined forces with Raven Catering, to form Raven Patisserie in 2005.“Raven has grown from strength to strength. We out-grew our premises in Braintree within two and a half years,” said McGrath. “This site in Witham is over 17,000 square feet and is large enough to handle the next phase of our growth.”The company, which currently employs 23 staff, supplies individually wrapped cakes, ambient bars and slices, luxury round cakes, and tray bakes to a number of tea rooms and restaurants across the UK. Passionately Cakes is now the brand name for the company’s counterline ‘grab and go’ bars.last_img read more

Group classified Draw Terms

first_img1. We are William Reed Business Media Ltd of Broadfield Park, Crawley RH11 9RT.2. Entry into the free-prize draw is subject to these rules and is open to UK residents aged 18 or over.3. Employees (and their families) of William Reed Business Media Ltd, William Reed Holdings Ltd and its subsidiaries, their agents and anybody professionally connected with the free prize draw are not eligible for entry.4. To be entered into the prize draw you must have contacted Group Classified as part of the September marketing campaign and provide a valid postal address for us to notify you if you win.5. Only one entry per person is permitted and anybody found to have submitted more than one entry will be disqualified.6. There is one prize. The first name drawn will receive a case bottle of Champagne7. The closing date for the draw is 30th November 2009. Only entries received by that date will be entered into the draw. We will not be responsible for delays in entries for any reason whatsoever.8. The winning name will be drawn at random on 7th December 2009 and will be notified by post with their prize on or before Monday 14th November 2009.9. To obtain the winner’s name send an SAE to Amie Letts, William Reed Business Media Ltd, Broadfield Park, Crawley, West Sussex RH11 9RT  by 12th November 2009.10. The decision of our Managing Director in all matters under our control is final and binding. No correspondence regarding the results of the draw will be entered into.11. We reserve the right to terminate or suspend the prize draw at any time.12. We reserve the right to publish the prize-winner’s name and/or pictures for future publicity and promotions.last_img read more

Convincing convection

first_imgRowlett Rutland’s newly launched GA43DX Twin convection oven is suitable for bakery, bake-off, foodservice, pizzas, confectionery and fast food. The electric oven measures 595mm x 610mm x 575mm externally (445mm x 415mm x 355mm internally) and features a timer, steam outlet and double-glazed doors.Electronic power and temperature are thermostatically controlled between 50ºC to 270ºC, and high-quality thermal insulation comes as standard.last_img

Broad consultancy role for veteran

first_imgIndustry veteran Brian Park is putting his 40 years’ experience to good use by advising bakery firms on everything from new product development (NPD) to training.Park has set up Optibake Consultancy International, after working with major flour milling companies and big bakery groups in areas such as wheat, flour and premix development to bakery management. He said: “I’m applying this experience to the customer’s requirements.”He is now taking on projects in the UK and Europe in product applications, NPD, problem-solving, efficiency and training applications, with a wide range of flour, pre-mix, ingredient and machinery suppliers, bakery manufacturers, food retailers and high street restaurants.For more information visit www.optibakeconsultancy.com or call  07798 611 617.last_img read more

Revolutionary moments

first_imgIs 2011 going to be the year of radical activism? It is when it comes to bread. Students of industrial loaf-making might not torch their bread plants this year, but the arrival of the first major breakthrough in dough processing for many years will at least cause people to sit up and take notice.It’s called the Radical Bread Process and comes from the same organisation that spawned the Chorleywood Bread Process (CBP) Campden BRI, formerly Campden & Chorleywood Food Research Association. The merits of CBP divide opinion as much as Marmite. But what nobody disputes is that it revolutionised breadmaking when it emerged in 1961, to eventually become the dominant method of breadmaking in the UK.Energy inputIn essence, CBP is a no-time dough process that is controlled by the energy input to the dough. The process employs mechanical dough development, which uses high-shear mixing to achieve physical changes in the dough that are traditionally brought about over extended time periods by fermentation. It uses a small amount of added fat and an oxidising agent, usually ascorbic acid.Following mixing, the dough is relaxed and the sheeted and rolled dough is then cut into four pieces, which are turned through 90 degrees when placed in the pan. The result is a fine structure, familiar to anyone who has bought a loaf of wrapped bread.Following demand in the industry for a new process that uses less energy-demanding mixing, more tolerance to raw materials’ variability and reduced product quality variation, the Radical Bread Process was developed and patents have been filed. The major change is the use of lamination currently largely used in pastry-making. This creates layers of dough. The other change is cutting, so the layers align in one direction. The bread loaf obtained by baking this dough exhibits a unique cellular structure.Most gas cells in the developed dough are disk-shaped (oblate) ellipsoids. Dough pieces are placed together in a pan, each piece being oriented in such a way that the polar axis of the ellipsoid gas cells coincides with the length dimension of the pan. During the subsequent leavening, the gas cells become elongated in a vertical direction.In simpler terms, this structure was found to increase the bread crumb’s resistance against tear during spreading. Slices of the loaves are also said to have a very bright appearance, ideal for white bread. What’s more, these loaves have a very regular shape, which should instantly appeal to those industrial producers of sandwich bread.Awaiting trialThe system is not yet on the market and is awaiting a major machinery supplier to run with it. With CBP so well established and the high cost and risks involved in adopting a commercially untried system, at a time when input costs in the industry are especially high, its success will rest on its reception within the industry. Q&A with Gary Tucker, head of baking and cereal processing at Campden BRI Given that this would involve a big investment in machinery for a plant bakery, what would you say is the overriding benefit? “The big benefit is bread quality. This is mostly an improved crumb structure because of around 10% more cells, aligned more in one direction than the swirls of a CBP loaf and, hence, a whiter appearance. Also, the crust sides are straighter because of the cell directional effect, which makes this ideal for sandwiches. Whether this is enough of a draw for bakers to invest is difficult to determine. Money is tight in the food industry, so this would need one of the equipment companies to take the lead, but with the collaboration of some bakers. It may be that Campden BRI can encourage this to happen through funding schemes such as the Technology Strategy Board.How does the mixing stage work?”The ingredients are first hydrated in a standard mixer, which could be Tweedy, spiral or bar mixer. This is just enough to form a dough that can be moved onto the lamination surface. The dough will be under-developed.”How long does each step in the process take?”First mix is about 30 seconds to one minute. Laminations can take 5-10 minutes, depending on how many laminations are required to develop the dough to its optimum condition. A very short relaxation or first proof stage is needed, but this can only be two to three minutes instead of the five to seven minutes usually needed with the CBP. The remaining stages of moulding, final proof and baking are the same as with other bread processes.”Is the total process quicker or slower than CBP?”It takes about the same time, although I suspect that, when scaled up, it will be a bit longer than CBP.”Will this new process change the way people use processing aids such as ascorbic acid or enzymes?”One of the benefits of developing dough with lamination is that the use of minor ingredients will be different. We have not done much work on this area, but we expect the Radical Bread Process to require a different set of improvers, and possibly fewer of them. For example, ascorbic acid will be less important because the dough does not need to be oxidised so quickly as with the CBP.”Would this process require any changes in ingredients or recipe formulation?”Yes, there is much scope for ingredient and process optimisation. There may even be the potential for lower-quality flours to be used for breadmaking, but this still needs to be determined.”When you say potential for lower quality flours, are you talking about protein levels? “Yes, and more specifically the proteins that form gluten when hydrated.”Are there any potential energy reductions?”The mixing stage of CBP is energy intensive, and a lower energy first mix, followed by more gentle lamination, will result in less energy being used. We cannot quantify this on a like-for-like basis, because we have not done the work. However, initial energy monitoring suggests the Radical process will use less than with CBP. I should point out that baking and cooling both consume more energy than mixing, but any savings must be worthwhile.”Do you believe this will ultimately replace CBP?”It’s unlikely to replace CBP, because of the success CBP has achieved. However, for the high-quality bread market there could be a place for this.” The Radical Bread Process in a nutshell l Ingredients are combined into an underdeveloped doughl Dough is subjected to deformation shear by using laminationl The developed dough is cut into piecesl Dough pieces are positioned in a pan so the laminations lie in one directionl Proving, baking and cooling is the same as for pan bread.last_img read more

EPOS kit is in the clouds

first_imgDoncaster-based firm AlfaRichi has launched a new EPOS system for bakeries, which it believes it is the first to use ’cloud computing’ for the back office. This avoids the risk of losing service or data, as the new system replicates this information on multiple secure servers.Tills are connected via broadband to AlfaRichi servers and all sales and stock data is available in real time anywhere there is an internet connection and browser. The data is stored in ’Oracle’ databases, with detailed sales and management reports available in seconds.The firm said its solutions have been designed specifically for bakeries and feature shop ordering, stock and waste management from the tills, ingredients management, and complex promotions.last_img read more

Government’s new obesity plan “woeful”

first_imgA government plea for people to eat less in a bid to battle the growing obesity crisis has been widely criticised by the public and the food industry.Launching a new “ambition” to bring down England’s obesity levels by 2020 yesterday, Health Secretary Andrew Lansley stressed he was not in favour of regulating the food and drink industry.However, the plea has been labelled “woefully inadequate” by Which? and was slammed by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver as “patronising”.Overall, Britons should be eating five billion fewer calories a day than at present, he added. The new obesity strategy says that, on average, adults are exceeding their recommended calorie intake by 10%. Lansley said government and business had a role to play, but people also needed to take responsibility for their own health.He insisted that “more progress has been made more quickly” through the Responsibility Deal with food and drink manufacturers than would have been managed through legislation. And he said the government would continue to “look at the evidence” on measures such as a “fat tax” on fatty foods, something Prime Minister David Cameron has said he would consider.More than 60% of adults in England and a third of 10 and 11-year-olds are obese. Mr Lansley said he would like to see school and work canteens carrying nutritional information about the calories in meals.Which? executive director Richard Lloyd described the strategy as “woefully inadequate”, adding: “Almost a quarter of the population is now obese, and the cost to the NHS and the wider economy is rapidly rising. The Government calls on people to cut down the calories they eat, but isn’t giving them the tools to do so.”However, the move for a lighter touch on legislation was welcomed by the Food and Drink Federation.Terry Jones, FDF director of communications, said: “We are pleased to see the Government taking a holistic approach to tackling the complex problem of obesity. The framework’s clear focus and defined roles for a wide range of players, including government, individuals, businesses and the health service at both a national and local level recognises that this is everybody’s business.“Food manufacturers have a great track record of positive contributions to improving public health, including clear labelling and reformulation of products, to help consumers make healthy choices. Following the announcement today, we are committed to continuing to work in partnership with the Department of Health and others through the Public Health Responsibility Deal to play our part in supporting people to achieve an appropriate calorie intake and a healthy lifestyle.”last_img read more

Man, 20, arrested for murder, attempted robbery in connection with teen boy’s death

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp By Jon Zimney – May 27, 2020 0 498 Pinterest Man, 20, arrested for murder, attempted robbery in connection with teen boy’s death Previous articleCoronavirus recession could cost Indiana $3 billionNext articleBMV extends branch hours prior to primary election Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+ IndianaLocalNews (Photo supplied/St. Joseph County Jail) An arrest has been made in an attempted robbery which resulted in the shooting death of a 13-year-old boy.(Photo supplied/ABC 57)It happened at Hickory Village Apartments back in December of 2017. Tyshawn Taylor suffered at least one gunshot wound and was pronounced dead at the scene.TreMare Lashawn Hill, 20, was found on Tuesday and booked into the St. Joseph County Jail on murder and attempted robbery charges with a firearm sentencing enhancement.Hill is scheduled to be arraigned on Wednesday afternoon.The St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office released the following information about Hill’s arrest and charges:The St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office has charged TreMare Lashawn Hill, 20, for his role in a December 26, 2017, attempted robbery and subsequent shooting that resulted in the death of 13 year old T.T. (Hickory Village Apartment complex, Mishawaka).He is charged with:Count I: Felony Murder a FelonyCount II: Attempted Robbery a Level 5 FelonyHe is also charged with a Firearm Sentencing Enhancement.Probable Cause was found and an arrest warrant ordered issued. Defendant was orderedheld without bond. St. Joseph County Metro Homicide Unit (CMHU) investigators, with assistance from the United States Marshals Task Force, were able to locate Mr. Hill and arrest him on this warrant earlier today at the 1855 Courthouse (112 S. Lafayette Blvd, South Bend). He was booked into the St. Joseph County Jail, where he remains in custody.He is scheduled to appear before a St. Joseph County Superior Court magistrate tomorrow, May 27th, at 1:00 p.m. for his arraignment.The sentencing range for Murder is 45 to 65 years. The sentencing range for a Level 5Felony is 1 to 6 years. A Firearm Sentencing Enhancement can add an additional 5 to 20years to the underlying conviction. Facebook Twitter Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Google+last_img read more

Studying connection between Alzheimer’s Disease and coronavirus

first_img Pinterest CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Google+ By Network Indiana – June 10, 2020 2 726 Facebook Google+ Studying connection between Alzheimer’s Disease and coronavirus (Photo supplied/Centers For Disease Control and Prevention) BLOOMINGTON, Ind.–The connection between Alzheimer’s Disease and coronavirus is apparent, but not yet understood said a doctor who is helping lead a study to find a cure for Alzheimer’s. Indiana University is one of the testing sites for that study.“This is a dosease, which we see from COVID, how vulnerable people with Alzheimer’s Disease are to communicable diseases,” said Dr. Jeffrey L. Cummings, Research Professor, Department of Brain Health at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas.“For reasons that are still to be determined we see that almost a third of all the deaths from COVID are nursing home residents and most of those residents have Alzheimer’s Disease,” he said. “So, there is some vulnerable link between Alzheimer’s Disease and COVID that we have yet to fully understand. But, what we see is the tremendous vulnerability that Alzheimer’s Disease has when it comes to COVID.”He said that’s why it’s more important now to find a cure. So, Cummings is inviting people to participate in the Alzheimer’s Prevention Trials Webstudy.“They take some memory tests and it’s kind of fun. It’s like card sorting tests, and they rate their own memory. We do that every three months for the rest of their lives.”The intent is to detect when there’s a slight change in a person’s memory. Cummings said having tens of thousands of people participate will give them a lot of information and will also help people who are in the early stages.“By being able to detect people who are in the earliest stages we can refer them to local universities that serve as clinical trial sites and they’re told about clinical trials,” said Cummings. He said the goal at that stage is to find medicines within the trials that could slow the disease down or cure it.IU is one of the sites.“They have a very active research group there. They’re part of the national infrastructure of Alzheimer’s Disease clinical trial sites,” he said. “They are fantastic leaders in many aspects of Alzheimer’s Disease research.”If you’d like to sign up to participate, you must be a healthy adult over 50. You can sign up at www.aptwebstudy.org. WhatsApp Previous articleMichigan releases statewide Wi-Fi hotspot map, includes 300+ locationsNext articleChild abuse reports down in Indiana since pandemic stay-at-home order Network Indianalast_img read more

Two men in Cass County hospitalized after receiving electrical shock

first_img Google+ Twitter WhatsApp Two men in Cass County hospitalized after receiving electrical shock By Jon Zimney – July 26, 2020 0 489 (Photo supplied/Cass County Sheriff’s Office) Two men were hospitalized after they received an electrical shock when a sailboat they were trying to move struck a power line.The incident happened around 1:20 p.m. on Saturday, July 25, in the 61000 block of Dailey Road in LaGrange Township in Cass County.The two men, ages 31 and 19, were hurt when the mast of the sailboat hit the line running to a house. The two brothers were moved away from the boat by rescuers.Both men were taken to Memorial Hospital in South Bend for treatment, then transferred to a hospital in Fort Wayne where they were listed in stable condition.This incident remains under investigation. Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest IndianaLocalMichiganNews Previous articleFond words about Notre Dame alum Regis Philbin from University presidentNext articleFour people shot in two separate early Sunday morning shootings in South Bend Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Facebook Pinterest Google+ Twitterlast_img read more

Indiana Chamber of Commerce issues priority list to lawmakers

first_img Google+ Indiana Chamber of Commerce issues priority list to lawmakers By Charles Edward (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons The Indiana Chamber of Commerce is asking the state General Assembly to take steps in 2021 to reinforce Indiana’s status as an economic leader in order to help businesses and their workers emerge from the prolonged pandemic.At its virtual legislative preview this past week, the organization unveiled the specific policy actions it believes will have the most impact on Indiana’s economic recovery:Enhanced legal liability protections for Hoosier businesses if an employee, customer or other person contracts the COVID-19 virus after returning to work or visiting the businessRaising the state’s cigarette tax to discourage smoking and vaping, plus shore up the state’s financesEstablishing a work share program that will allow employers to maintain a skilled stable workforce during economic downturns, like what has happened during the current pandemicIncreasing incentives for attracting remote workers to Indiana to help mitigate the projected losses to its workforce over the next decade (due in large part to Baby Boomers retiring)Additional state efforts to further prepare Indiana for the digital economy, including continuing to bring high speed broadband to all corners of the state“The pandemic was unforeseen and state funds have dwindled, but Indiana is in better position that most and can take charge of how it makes its way back,” says Indiana Chamber President and CEO Kevin Brinegar.He cautioned, however, that businesses should not be penalized for the pandemic in the form of paying more taxes or fees.“Too many companies have closed and more are barely hanging on. Instead, businesses and the workforce need as much certainty and targeted assistance in the form of incentives and opportunities. That’s how we can protect employers and employment, and start to get more back to normal.”Brinegar said he’s pleased that protecting businesses and institutions from legal liability regarding COVID-19 is also a priority of legislative leadership.He also noted that incentives around remote workers and further preparing all areas of the state for new technology are no longer an option but required. “Broadband connectivity – and ultimate consumer adoption – is becoming as important an infrastructure need as water and electricity.”Two long-standing priorities the Indiana Chamber has pushed for several years reappear on the list and seem to have their best chance of occurring in 2021: Raising the cigarette tax and the state implementing a work share program.Brinegar explained that beyond the obvious health care advantages for a state lacking in positive health outcomes, “Indiana’s smoking rate is fourth highest in the U.S., and our cigarette tax is the lowest in the Midwest and 37th lowest in the nation. With a critical need for the state to replenish its general fund, the so-called sin taxes, like on tobacco, are a likely place for lawmakers to start.”Work share legislation has yet to be voted on by the House or Senate; the Indiana Chamber sees support building for the state to join the 28 others in enacting “this common sense” employment policy.“Under a work share program, employers can reduce hours without full layoffs, enabling workers to keep their jobs (and benefits) – which, over time, could be returned to full-time status once economic circumstances improve.“We don’t know how long this recovery is going to take or if there will be more downturns along the way. What we do know is that if Indiana had a work share program currently in place, federal CARES Act money would have covered ALL the unemployment benefits for employees on work share through the end of the year.“As it is, the state’s unemployment insurance (UI) trust fund had to pay tens of millions of dollars in the benefits for those employees. This, in turn, caused the fund to be depleted faster and the state to borrow more money from the federal government than it would have if Indiana had enacted a workshare program.  We can’t afford to get caught without a work share program again,” Brinegar concludes.A panel discussion featuring all four General Assembly caucus leaders was also part of the annual Indiana Chamber event. The detailed rundown of the group’s legislative initiatives – for 2021 and long term – is available at www.indianachamber.com/priorities. Google+ WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest By Jon Zimney – November 21, 2020 1 271 Previous articleCOVID concerns force the delay of the South Bend police tapes trialNext articleEducation task force wants civics lessons to take bigger priority in schools Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Facebook Twitter Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewslast_img read more

Doctor: Your heart is actually capable of breaking

first_img Facebook Pinterest (“stethoscope” by PROjasleen_kaur, CC BY-SA 2.0) Valentine’s Day is coming up, so be warned: your heart is actually capable of breaking.Stress-induced cardiomyopathy, or Broken Heart Syndrome, is a “stress hormone response that causes reduced heart function and heart failure”, says IU Health cardiologist Dr. Kyle Frick.According to Dr. Frick, Broken Heart Syndrome is typically brought on by intense emotional or physical stressors.“Any intense emotional or physical stressor, so the loss of a loved one, even something like winning the lottery, those things can produce a surge in adrenaline which can cause Broken Heart Syndrome,” Dr. Frick said. “Also things we see in the hospital, like a big surgery, or being sick.”Typically, about 1 to 2 percent of people who come to the Emergency Room with heart attack symptoms will have Broken Heart Syndrome, says Dr. Frick. However, the stress of the pandemic has brought that number up to 7 to 8 percent.He says the existence of Broken Heart Syndrome truly shows that our mental and emotional health is often connected to our physical health — so we should be taking good care of both.“Just trying to overall manage your emotional and physical well-being,” Dr. Frick said. “That means not only diet, exercise, but taking care of your emotional health as well. Doing things that make you happy and keeping you in the right frame of mind.”Overall, Dr. Frick says Broken Heart Syndrome is rare — but if you have symptoms that are new and worrisome, like chest pain or shortness of breath, you should talk to your doctor. By Network Indiana – February 14, 2021 0 229 Google+ IndianaLocalNews Pinterest Twitter WhatsApp WhatsApp Previous articleFour people arrested on drug, weapons charges on U.S. 31 near RochesterNext articleBill to help pregnant moms hits speed bump at Indiana Statehouse Network Indiana Google+ Doctor: Your heart is actually capable of breaking Twitter Facebooklast_img read more

Press release: Culture is Digital report will unleash the creative potential of technology for cultural organisations

first_imgNOTES TO EDITORS:Showcases at the event included: When culture and technology come together, great things can happen. The Royal Opera House is exploring immersive technology to open up a suite of new experiences, sharing the extraordinary qualities of ballet and opera with audiences old and new in our digital age. This report acts as a useful framework for all in our sectors to explore this territory. Our cultural output has always been our unique calling card to the rest of the world and when combined with the latest digital developments there is no limit to our creativity. We want the UK to be the best place in the world to trial pioneering technology, while also maintaining our world leading status as a centre of artistic and cultural excellence. Our Culture Is Digital report sets out how culture and technology can collaborate, learn from one another and keep innovating. By embracing new technologies and attracting more diverse audiences, we will continue to cement our status as a creative powerhouse in the digital age. Arts Council England and the Heritage Lottery Fund will invest more than £2 million to build the digital capacity of their sectors The National Gallery will create an Innovation Lab to examine how museums and cultural organisations can use immersive media, such as virtual and augmented reality, to enhance visitors’ experiences The Royal Opera House will create an Audience Lab, which will work with diverse talent to create content using emerging technologies and develop cross-sector collaborations Heritage Lottery Fund Chief Executive Ros Kerslake said: Every day across England, artists, performers, museums, libraries and arts organisations create brilliant new content. We want to make sure they have the skills to use the best technology to enable more people in more places to connect directly to this deep well of creativity. We welcome this timely report from DCMS. As we have set out in our current consultation on future funding, HLF is committed to supporting digital capacity in the heritage sector, building on the considerable progress that has already been made. We look forward to working with Arts Council England and other partners in making our collective aspirations for digital culture a reality. DCMS Secretary of State Matt Hancock announced the move as part of the Culture is Digital report, which sets out an ambitious framework for how culture and technology can work together to increase participation and boost the capability of cultural organisations.It is the first time that the Government has looked at how the two sectors can work together to unleash the creative potential of technology and help bring every cultural organisation – both big and small – into the digital age.The report makes a number of commitments, including:center_img Arts Council England will also create and pilot the use of a Digital Maturity Index for the cultural sector, to help organisations improve their digital capability.ACE will also work with the Heritage Lottery Fund to form a Digital Culture Code – a set of guidelines and principles which cultural organisations will be encouraged to sign up to help increase their digital skills.Arts Council England Chief Executive Darren Henley said: The National Gallery is committed to an ambitious five-year programme of digital change. This goes from evolving our approach to ticketing through the use of big data, to launching new mobile services, to embedding innovation in immersive media in the Gallery through our forthcoming Lab. We are excited by today’s launch of the Culture is Digital report. The commitment it marks from DCMS, the Arts Council and cultural organisations across the country to digital transformation heralds an exciting new period for us all. Royal Opera House Chief Executive Alex Beard said: Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, said: The Culture is Digital report showcases innovative projects in the creative sector, highlighting the extraordinary collaborations between our world-leading cultural and digital pioneers.It was launched at the National Gallery showcasing some of the finest recent examples of digital culture, including cutting-edge immersive installations using the latest technology.The #CultureisDigital project was informed by an online open conversation last yearand was borne out of the Government’s Culture White Paper commitment to review the digitisation of our public collections and enhance the online cultural experience.It also builds upon the Government’s UK Digital Strategy commitment to increase digital skills, digital participation and unlock the power of data.Dr Gabriele Finaldi, National Gallery Director, said: Factory 42 – Hold the World with David Attenborough: In Hold the World, Sir David and the Natural History Museum are brought together using a combination of interactive video game technology and TV documentary. Sir David will be transformed into a hologram and will guide participants to virtually handle fossils, using his passion for the natural world to bring objects to life. Science Museum/Alchemy VR: Space Descent VR, a unique and immersive virtual reality experience commissioned by Alchemy VR for the Science Museum Group in which astronaut Tim Peake guides you through a thrilling, high-speed journey to Earth in the Soyuz TMA-19M. BBC/Civilisations: As part of the Culture UK initiative, BBC R&D has collaborated with BBC Arts to offer the museum sector, galleries and libraries a number of exciting opportunities to be involved in the news series ‘Civilisations’ on BBC 2. The Welsh National Opera/REWIND: Magic Butterfly – the combined experience of The Magic Flute and Madam Butterfly in VR – was a collaboration between the WNO and immersive content studio REWIND. The interactive immersive virtual reality experience combines motion capture, animation, music and technology. Smartify: A virtual art guide enabling audiences to scan and identify artwork in museums and receive rich information via text, audio and video using augmented reality. You can follow #CultureIsDigital on social media and explore our interactive 360 degree presentation that allows users to learn about case studies and other key aspects of the report.last_img read more

Press release: 100 miles of extra lanes coming to North West motorways

first_img Smart motorways have been proven to be effective at tackling congestion, with the smart motorway on the M62 in West Yorkshire saving commuters an average of 30 minutes each week. We’ll be starting work on four new smart motorways in the North West over the next 18 months and will do everything we can to keep disruption to a minimum, including only closing parts of the motorway overnight when traffic levels are much lower. The North West’s new smart motorway routes will provide over 100 miles of extra lanes benefiting the hundreds of thousands of drivers who use our motorways every day for commuting, business and leisure. Drivers can find out more about the work being carried out to complete the Manchester smart motorway upgrade in a new video:Manchester smart motorway nears completionSmart motorways use the latest technology to monitor traffic levels so that variable speed limits can be automatically set on overhead electronic signs to keep traffic moving at a steady speed.The hard shoulders on each new smart motorway route will be converted into permanent extra lanes and new emergency areas will be created for drivers to use if they break down.New CCTV cameras will also provide 100% coverage of the routes and Highways England will be able to display red Xs on overhead signs to close any lane, allowing its traffic officers and the emergency services to get through.Construction work will begin on a 3-mile stretch of the M62 near junction 12 this summer. Temporary narrow lanes will be introduced to allow contractors to work at the side of the motorway, and a 50mph speed limit will be needed for the safety of drivers and workers.The roadworks will be gradually extended to junction 10 by the autumn and the smart motorway scheme is due to be completed by spring 2020.Variable speed limits will also be introduced between junctions 10 and 18 on the M60 later this summer when the remaining section of the North West’s first smart motorway goes live. The speed limit will remain at 50mph until then while the new technology is being fine-tuned.Overnight resurfacing work will continue into the autumn on parts of the M60 once the smart motorway is operational. This work will take place at night so that the route can remain fully open with no impact on drivers during the day.Other schemes taking place in the North West include a 20-mile-stretch of smart motorway on the M6 in Cheshire where construction work is due to be completed by spring 2019, providing 40 miles of extra lanes for drivers.Work will start in spring 2019 on a 4-mile smart motorway on the M56 near Manchester Airport, and on a 10-mile stretch of smart motorway on the part of the M6 which links the M62 near Warrington to the M58 near Skelmersdale.Finally, a new 19-mile smart motorway will be created over the Pennines on the M62 between Rochdale and Brighouse. The route will link up with other schemes on the M62 to create almost 60 miles of smart motorway between the North West and Yorkshire, with construction work due to start in autumn 2019.Find out more details about driving on a smart motorway.General enquiriesMembers of the public should contact the Highways England customer contact centre on 0300 123 5000.Media enquiriesJournalists should contact the Highways England press office on 0844 693 1448 and use the menu to speak to the most appropriate press officer. Four new smart motorway schemes, worth around £500 million, are due to start construction work within the next 18 months.Contractors for Highways England will begin work on the first one later this summer – on a 9 mile stretch of the M62 which links the M6 near Warrington to the M60 near Eccles.Drivers have already been able to use over 10 miles of extra lanes on the M62 near Rochdale since December last year, and a stretch of smart motorway has also been completed on the M60 near the Trafford Centre.The final temporary narrow lanes were removed earlier this week on the Manchester smart motorway scheme, and more than 200 electronic signs are due to be switched on later this month on a 9 mile stretch of the M60 between Trafford Park and the M62/M66 interchange at Simister Island.Mike Bull, Highways England’s smart motorways programme manager for the North, said:last_img read more

Press release: Government’s new planning rulebook to deliver more quality, well-designed homes

first_img Contact form https://forms.communit… Media enquiries stronger protection for the environment Building attractive and better-designed homes in areas where they are needed is at the centre of new planning rules published by Secretary of State Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP today (24 July 2018).The new rules will also make it easier for councils to challenge poor quality and unattractive development, and give communities a greater voice about how developments should look and feel.The revised National Planning Policy Framework follows a public consultation launched by the Prime Minister earlier this year to provide a comprehensive approach for planners, developers and councils to build more homes, more quickly and in the places where people want to live. Fundamental to building the homes our country needs is ensuring that our planning system is fit for the future. This revised planning framework sets out our vision of a planning system that delivers the homes we need. I am clear that quantity must never compromise the quality of what is built, and this is reflected in the new rules. We have listened to the tens of thousands of people who told us their views, making this a shared strategy for development in England. Social media – MHCLG Please use this number if you are a journalist wishing to speak to Press Office 0303 444 1209 Revised National Planning Policy Framework Ministers have been clear on their ambition to achieve 300,000 new homes a year by the mid-2020s, which follows 217,000 homes built last year, the biggest increase in housing supply in England for almost a decade.The new rules will see 85 of the proposals set out in the housing white paper and the Budget, implemented in the new National Planning Policy Framework.Promoting high quality design of new homes and placesRefocusing on the quality and design of proposals which are in line with what local communities want, the framework ensures councils have the confidence and tools to refuse permission for development that does not prioritise design quality and does not complement its surroundings.With an emphasis on engaging with communities and allowing residents to see proposed development before it’s even built, the new framework encourages councils to make use of innovative new visual tools to promote better design and quality, which will also make sure new homes fit in with their surroundings.Adopted neighbourhood plans will demonstrate clear local leadership in design quality, with the framework allowing groups seeking such plans to truly reflect the community’s expectations on how new development will visually contribute to their area.Whilst the framework sets the strategic direction for driving up new build quality, it will remain up to councils to apply these polices in the most appropriate way in their area, recognising that they are well placed to know their area’s unique character and setting.To maximise the use of land we are promoting more effective use of the land available and giving councils more confidence to refuse applications that don’t provide enough homes.Stronger protection for the environmentThe new framework has also been updated to provide further protection for biodiversity; ensuring wildlife thrives at the same time as addressing the need for new homes.Changes to the framework see the planning system align more closely with Defra’s 25 Year Environment Plan, which aims to leave the environment in a better state for future generations. This includes more protection for habitats, and places greater importance on air quality when deciding development proposals.It provides strengthened protection for ancient woodland and ancient and veteran trees across England, ensuring they can be retained for the benefit of future generations.Whilst giving councils real flexibility to make the most of their existing brownfield land, the revised framework makes sure they exhaust all other reasonable options for development before looking to alter a Green Belt boundary.The government has more explicitly outlined the protection of the Green Belt in England, explaining the high expectations and considerable evidence that would be needed to alter any boundary.Building the right number of homes in the right placesTo help tackle unaffordable house prices in many areas across the country, the framework sets out a new way for councils to calculate the housing need of their local community (including different forms of housing, such as older people’s retirement homes).This new methodology aims to deliver more homes in the places where they are most needed, based on factors including the affordability of existing homes for people on lower and medium incomes.Greater responsibility and accountability for housing delivery from councils and developersFrom November 2018 councils will have a Housing Delivery Test focused on driving up the numbers of homes actually delivered in their area, rather than how many are planned for.In addition, to make sure that the necessary infrastructure and affordable housing is delivered to support communities, clearer guidance for both developers and councils will also be published today.Meaning that developers will know what is expected of them up front, even before they submit a planning application and councils have greater power to hold them to these commitments.Further informationThe publication of the National Planning Policy Framework follows the government’s first Design Quality Conference held in London earlier this year, which demonstrated our commitment to engaging local government and industry to promote and deliver a step change in the design quality of new development.See the final National Planning Policy Framework published today (24 July 2018).During the consultation the government held 10 regional engagement events and approximately 40 individual meetings.29,224 responses received to the government’s consultation on the revised National Planning Policy Framework. This included over 25,000 campaign responses. Secretary of State for Communities, Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP said: If your enquiry is related to COVID-19 please check our guidance page first before you contact us – https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-local-government.If you still need to contact us please use the contact form above to get in touch, because of coronavirus (COVID-19). If you send it by post it will not receive a reply within normal timescale.center_img Email [email protected] building the right number of homes in the right places General enquiries: please use this number if you are a member of the public 030 3444 0000 greater responsibility and accountability for housing delivery from councils and developers Office address and general enquiries 2 Marsham StreetLondonSW1P 4DF The new rule book will focus on: promoting high quality design of new homes and places Twitter – https://twitter.com/mhclgFlickr – http://www.flickr.com/photos/mhclgLinkedIn – http://www.linkedin.com/company/mhclglast_img read more

Statutory guidance: The Exercise of Commissioning Functions by the NHS Commissioning Board (Coronavirus) (No 2) Directions 2020

first_imgThese directions replace those published on 20 April and set out the exercise of functions for NHSE England to support the provision of services by the NHS to address the coronavirus (COVID-19) emergency.The power will last until 31 March 2021.last_img

Waterstones selects Yorkshire producers to supply to in-branch café

first_imgYorkshire’s local foodstuffs will be on sale in Waterstones’ Café W, Coney Street, York, thanks to the book shop giant choosing local producers to supply the branch, such as Shipley bakery, Just Desserts.This decision has been applauded by Yorkshire’s Regional Food Group.Jamie Hanslip, bookshop manager at Waterstones York, said: “I am delighted to say that Café W at Waterstones York has been an incredible success, thanks in no small part to the support of our fantastic local suppliers, who have really helped to build our reputation with their delicious produce. It gives us real pleasure to be able to champion the food of some of Yorkshire’s finest producers and the customer response has been brilliant.”Instead of using international coffee chains, Café W, Yorkshire sources 90% of food and drink in the café locally, to help boost the local economy.These local suppliers were selected by Waterstones with help from organisation DeliciouslyorkshireJo Satariano, marketing manager at Deliciouslyorkshire said: “It’s great news to see a national chain like Waterstones putting local food on their agenda. Being able to supply Café W at York is a fantastic opportunity for some of our smaller producers and we were thrilled to be able to help the Waterstones team find the local suppliers they needed to make the café a success.”Just Desserts, the Shipley-based bakery, will be supplying premium handmade desserts to the newly launched café.James O’Dwyer, managing director of the dessert company, said “Supplying the new Cafe W at Waterstones in York is hugely significant and it’s great that they are offering their customers a local flavour by championing the best food and drink from the region.“To be associated with a high-profile company sends out positive messages about how we are perceived as a supplier. It also helps to raise our local and national profile, as well as providing a solid platform to develop new business and further extend our distribution area.”Café W is a concept being rolled out nationally by Waterstones, which now has 20 bookshops housing the unique coffee and food shops. More are scheduled to open in 2014.last_img read more

Greggs raises profits outlook

first_imgBakery chain Greggs delivered a shock trading update this morning to reveal that its full-year profits would be ahead of analysts’ expectations.Chief executive Roger Whiteside said customers were ‘responding’ to improvements in products and services – as it unveiled own shop like-for-like sales (LFLs) growth of 5.2% for the 24 weeks to 13 December, compared with growth of just 0.7% in the same period last year.For the year-to-date LFLs were up 4.2%, added Greggs, significantly better than the -1.1% decline seen in the same period in 2013.Total sales were also up by 3.6%.Whiteside said: “The strong performance that we reported in our September IMS has continued. Trading conditions have remained helpful, but there is no doubt that customers are also responding to improvements in our product and service offer and to the investment we are making in the shop environment.“Whilst there is still much to play for over the final few weeks of the year, we currently anticipate that full-year profits will be ahead of analysts’ expectations.”The company said it would also update the market following its Christmas trading period and ahead of its full-year results.last_img read more

Charity welcomes new allergen labelling

first_imgCoeliac UK has welcomed new EU food labelling regulations, claiming they will provide better certainty for people with coeliac disease. The charity, which supports people who have the autoimmune disease cause by gluten, said it would help coeliacs manage their condition, and understand what products contain the allergen.Despite the change to regulations, the charity is still urging retailers to put a clear ‘gluten-free’ label on relevant products, to assure customers.Sarah Sleet, chief executive of Coeliac UK, said: “Making sure businesses provide clear, unambiguous information to customers enables people with coeliac disease to shop and eat out safely and confidently. The new regulation means people with coeliac disease will have a better understanding of whether the food they purchase from a supermarket or order at a food venue contains gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye.“Although the rules are a great step forward, for total peace of mind, we are encouraging all caterers and retailers to label food gluten-free to show their customers what they can eat without fear of cross-contamination.“Catering businesses will also benefit significantly as research shows people with coeliac disease – and the family and friends they eat out with – are worth a potential £100 million a year to venues willing to provide dishes labelled gluten-free. For businesses that have already taken up this option the impact on their bottom line is overwhelmingly positive.”The regulations become law on 13 December, and will require businesses to provide information about allergens, either on product ingredients lists on-pack, or in the establishment if it is not packaged.The new rules do not, however, require businesses to declare any risk of cross-contamination with gluten.The EU rules were published in 2011 to give food businesses three years to get ready for the new provisions.last_img read more

Irwin’s to promote Northern Ireland

first_imgIrwin’s has teamed up with Tourism Ireland to promote a “visit Northern Ireland” message to consumers via an on-pack marketing campaign.In support of the Year of Food 2016, Irwin’s will launch an on-pack campaign across Great Britain, encouraging people to visit Northern Ireland for its food and famous hospitality. It will run on packs of the bakery’s Rankin Selection range of traditional Irish breads.Colette Wilson, marketing manager at Irwin’s, said: “The Year of Food is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate the quality of our food and, of course, the warmth of our hospitality.“Partnering with Tourism Ireland gives us a valuable opportunity to showcase the Rankin Selection product range and reinforce its authentic Irish heritage – as well as encouraging consumers to take the next step and visit Northern Ireland.”Open nowAn on-pack competition is open now until 15 May. Five pairs of winners will win two nights’ B&B in a four-star hotel, one evening meal, return flights and a Belfast Food Tour.Last month, Irwin’s announced that it will supply more than 100,000 packs of its new wheaten bread products to all Asda stores in Northern Ireland.last_img read more

Welsh Hills wins export award

first_imgFamily-run operation Welsh Hills Bakery triumphed at the South and Mid Wales Chambers Welsh Business Awards in the Success in Overseas Trade category and went on to be named overall winner on the night.The Hirwaun-based business, which supplies gluten-, dairy- and wheat-free cakes and biscuits to countries including Australia and the Middle East, triumphed in the Success through Overseas Trade category for the second year running, before being named overall winner at the ceremony last week (23 February).The 60-year-old bakery was started in 1956 by Aberdare baker Ernest Rule and his wife Ruby. It is now run by the third generation of the same family, employs 82 staff and produces over 80 product lines.Last year the business sold around £5m-worth of products, 20% of which were exports. The first company to supply two major UK supermarket chains (Sainsbury’s and Tesco) with their own brand of gluten-free products, it has since added others to the portfolio including Asda, Waitrose, Morrisons and Holland & Barrett.“Last year, at these awards, we were privileged to win the Success through Overseas Trade Welsh Business Award,” said Julian Cruttenden, commercial head of Welsh Hills Bakery. “To win it twice is overwhelming. The acknowledgement that we were doing a great job encouraged us to focus our efforts even more on the export sector.“In 2016, 20% of our sales were in exports. We are currently in talks with Japan and Dubai and planning to increase that figure by a further 50% in the next 12 months. All this and we are about to appear in a Morrisons advert. This support and validation means the world to us.”last_img read more

How does a bakery launch a home delivery service?

first_imgBakery businesses are launching delivery services, either locally or nationally, to continue to thrive during the coronavirus pandemic. Here, they discuss how to get started.“Transforming our business into a food delivery service was something we never anticipated or planned for,” explains Sara Christey of Edinburgh’s The Beach House Café & Bakery.Like many bakery businesses, the bakery has adapted to trading under coronavirus and, with the help of volunteers, is providing essential groceries to consumers who cannot get to the supermarket.A small team are delivering boxes of food to doorsteps by bike, and the business is also offering a pick-up service that involves minimal contact.“Our local community have supported us for years and we thought this was an opportunity to give something back – we are on a very steep learning curve and adding new, high-quality products every day,”“Our local community have supported us for years and we thought this was an opportunity to give something back – we are on a very steep learning curve and adding new, high-quality products every day,” she adds.With vulnerable or self-isolating consumers unable or unwilling to leave their homes or visit supermarkets, many bakeries are working with their suppliers to offer groceries – such as cheese, milk, meat, flour and eggs – alongside their bakery products.Scarborough-based Cooplands (pictured) has combined some of its suppliers’ products with its own baked goods to create the Food Parcels service. Priced at £35 including delivery, the parcels contain a selection of essential groceries, bread and sweet treats such as flapjacks.It took Cooplands three days, working with agency Savvy Marketing, to develop a digital platform connected to its website that could take orders and payment online, with central management similar to how the business manages orders from its shops.“Partnering with delivery companies is expensive, so leveraging owned assets is important,” says Cooplands CEO Belinda Youngs. “Bakers are not delivering main meal solutions and generally have a lower average order, so efficient processes and restricted, densely populated geography are key success indicators.”Important things to think about are product ranges, how and when orders will be taken, the notice given for an order, delivery times and if businesses can produce the items ordered, advises Neville Morse, managing director at Janes Pantry.Bakeries also need to decide if they are local, regional or national, suggests Laurence Smith, owner of Fatherson Bakery. Options include using existing vehicles currently available in the business, working with a distribution partner or investing in a fleet.Smith says having a core project team and strong e-commerce platform was critical to his business launching its own grocery delivery website in a week.London-based Today Bread (pictured, right) set up online ordering through the Square Online Store system for a delivery and collection service.“It’s all about adapting and focusing on what’s possible or can be affordably accessed,” says Today Bread founder Alexandre Bettler. “Some of our team have brought in or sourced bikes to get orders to customers. You can either try to keep everything in house, or bring in third-parties to fill the gaps you can’t provide.”Working with a third party allows businesses to tap its customer base and expertise, adds a spokesperson from Just Eat. To work with an aggregator, however, businesses need paperwork to show proof of ownership, that the business address is registered with the council and Food Standards Agency (FSA) or Food Standards Scotland (FSS). To sign up with Just Eat, for example, they would need an FSA rating of three or above, or a Pass in Scotland.The decision to deliver on your own or go through an app is entirely individual, says Romy Miller, commercial director at Gail’s Bakery, which has an online shop selling produce and groceries for home delivery and click & collect.“There are benefits to retaining the end-to-end customer relationship, but there are also challenges with trouble-shooting last-mile issues, when they happen. Going through an app has fees attached to it, but there is a benefit in ready-and-waiting mass customer awareness.”But whatever approach a business takes, offering delivery can give bakers access to new custom.“The current Covid-19 period has given rise to a new delivery marketplace – there are so many great things available that we could never access direct to our homes in the past,” adds Miller.last_img read more

FOB: Furlough scheme vital for foodservice bakeries

first_imgThe extension of the job furlough scheme has been welcomed by a baking industry suffering from the collapse of the foodservice market.Chancellor Rishi Sunak this week announced that the scheme to pay workers on leave because of coronavirus will be extended to October. It is estimated a quarter of the UK workforce is now covered by the scheme.Employees will continue to receive 80% of their monthly wages up to £2,500 until the end of July, but the government will ask companies to contribute to the cost of the scheme from August, when employers will be able to bring furloughed employees back part-time.Baking industry trade groups have said the scheme has been essential during the outbreak.Although there has been a huge increase in demand for bread at retail, many bakery businesses have been hit hard by the closure of trade customers such as pubs, restaurants and schools.“Some of our members, where foodservice is an integral part of their business, have seen a significant decrease in sales,” said Federation of Bakers chief executive Gordon Polson.“During these difficult times and while the foodservice industry remains affected by Covid-19, we believe this government support is essential in helping to ensure the future of many businesses in the bread and bakery industry.”Trade group Scottish Bakers said its members were reporting that 80% of bakery businesses had now furloughed staff, with a significant proportion of the sector ceasing to trade altogether.The organisation added that this meant almost half of all Scottish bakery shops and all bakery cafés were now closed, and that many bakers feared they would be unable to continue trading or remain viable for much longer.“This announcement by the Chancellor offers a real lifeline to many struggling small and medium-sized bakery businesses throughout Scotland,” said Scottish Bakers chief executive Alasdair Smith.“The extension will allow businesses to more carefully plan their escape from lockdown and begin to bring back staff in a more measured way over a longer period of time. This will help them build up their capacity as demand for their products begins to recover with greater freedom of movement for our population.”He added that being able to plan as far forward as the end of October was a welcome extra relief for businesses and would help to preserve many jobs in the sector.last_img read more

All-butter croissants added to St Pierre pastry line-up

first_imgSt Pierre Groupe has launched new all-butter croissants to tap the indulgent breakfast trend.The flaky All Butter Croissants had a sweet and buttery taste and offered consumers an indulgent breakfast, said the firm. Made in France, the croissants are sold in a pack of four with an rsp of £1.99.They are available now in grocery, wholesale and independent retailers.The long shelf life of the product would help consumers and retailers reduce food waste, added the business.“Our new All Butter Croissants are a great addition to our popular St Pierre croissant range. With indulgent treats and morning goods currently driving bakery category growth, we are confident that this new launch will be a hit with consumers seeking out indulgent breakfast products,” said Paul Baker, founder of St Pierre Groupe.St Pierre is currently growing 21% in value sales year-on-year, according to Nielsen.last_img read more

Bakers unveil new products for Veganuary 2021

first_imgSource: HiggidyThe firm said it has cracked the recipe for a vegan quiche with no cream, milk or eggs. Packed full of veg, the quiche come in two variants – sharing-sized Spinach & Roasted Tomato Vegan Quiche and the individual-sized Porcini Mushroom & Spinach Vegan Quiche.Higgidy is also adding Mini No-Pork Pies, made with vegetables and green lentils, to its line-up.The range will be available in Waitrose from 30 December, as well as Sainsbury’s and Boots early in 2021. Prices range from £2.50 to £4.25.“The expansion of our plant-based offering is a really exciting move for us and we see it becoming an increasingly important area within the Higgidy portfolio. Our ambition is to become the market leaders of vegan pastries,” said Higgidy co-founder Camilla Stephens. Source: GatoProtein ‘n’ Cream Cookies, GâtoPlant-based specialist Gâto is looking to tick all the boxes with its latest range. Called Protein ‘n’ Cream, the four-strong selection of sandwich cookies feature 10g of protein, as well as being vegan, gluten-free and containing 70% less carbs and sugar than other biscuits.The variants are: Chocolate Orange, Salted Caramel, Peanut Caramel and Vanilla Cream. They see flavoured vegan caramel or cream sandwiched between crisp cookies, with natural ingredients such as almond butter and cacao.Available in Boots stores nationwide, the protein cookies have an rsp of £2.19 per 50g pack. Mini Jam Doughnut, Birds BakeryBirds Bakery is increasing its range of vegan-friendly products in time for Veganuary with a raft of new offerings including mini jam doughnuts, gingerbread biscuits and sandwiches. Source: CooplandsVegan Devonshire Split, CooplandsCooplands has launched what it claims to be the first vegan-friendly cream cake on the UK high street. It’s Vegan Devonshire Split comprises a soft sweet bun filled with strawberry jam and a whipped cream alternative from the makers of Elmlea’s Plant Cream.It also has a new vegan savoury pastry range will include sausage rolls and steak bakes, plus a vegan pizza slice made with Violife’s Epic Mature Cheddar. There will also be a Cheeze & Pickle Sandwich made with the same vegan cheese as well as a Cheeze & Vegetable Bake, which it introduced earlier this year. All of these will be on sale at its 170 stores across Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Nottingham and the north east from January.The Cooplands vegan range includes: Source: Coughlans BakeryThis Isn’t Bacon Turnover, Coughlans BakeryCoughlans Bakery has extended its vegan-friendly portfolio with a vegan bacon turnover.Called the This Isn’t Bacon Turnover, it features plant-based rashers from firm This Isn’t alongside vegan cheese and slow roasted tomatoes wrapped in puff pastry.The chain, with shops across south London and Surrey, has focused on plant-based NPD in recent years, with launches including a vegan sausage roll and a Vegan Bacon & Beef Wellington. Source: Coughlans BakeryBakers, retailers and manufacturers are gearing up for Veganuary 2021 with a host of new products.There’s sweet and savoury treats galore from protein cookies to pizza, ‘bacon’ turnovers and quiche.According to The Vegan Society, there are roughly 600,000 vegans in Britain, with 400,000 people worldwide signing up to take part in Veganuary last year. It added that it expects these numbers to swell for Veganuary 2021.Here’s some of the NPD hitting the shelves ahead of the occasion: Source: HiggidyVegan Quiche, HiggidySavoury pastry brand Higgidy has launched its first-ever vegan quiches as part of its expanded plant-based range. Source: CooplandsVegan Steak BakeVegan Sausage Roll – £1Vegan Steak Bake – £1.50Cheeze & Vegetable Bake – £1.50Vegan Pizza Slice – £1.55Cheeze & Pickle Sandwich – £1.65Vegan Devonshire Split – £1.15“We are committed to creating great food that everyone can enjoy whether they’re meat lovers, flexitarian, dairy-free or vegan. We’ve worked hard to create our vegan range that packs in all the flavour and that tastes so good, it would be hard to tell the difference or miss the meat,” said Cooplands CEO Belinda Youngs. Source: OggsOggs Bites, OggsOggs is entering the snack aisle with a two-strong range of grab-and-go sharing bags.They’re available as Brownie Bites, described as ‘fudgy and moist’, and Millionaire Bites with vegan chocolate and caramel on top of a biscuit base.The brownies have 58 calories per bite while the millionaire variant has 66 calories per bite. Both roll out in Sainsbury’s and WHSmith stores in January 2021 with an rsp of £2.25 per pack of nine.Instead of egg, Oggs uses aquafaba (chickpea water). It claims that by swapping out eggs, each bite generates five times less CO2 and a further eight times less by switching butter for a vegan option. Source: White RabbitThe Vegan Arrabbiata, White Rabbit PizzaPizza specialist White Rabbit is venturing out of the free from aisles and into the mainstream with its latest piece of NPD – The Vegan Arrabbiata.It marks the company’s first wheat base pizza as it ventures outside of its usual gluten-free remit. Still catering for the meat- and dairy-free audience, The Vegan Arrabbiata has a wood-fired base and is topped with spicy chicken-free strips, roasted onions, sundried tomatoes and creamy mozzarisella (a vegan mozzarella alternative).To distinguish its latest launch from the rest of its portfolio, White Rabbit has given it a ‘bold new pack design’. It hits shelves in Sainsbury’s on 2 January with an rsp of £4.50.Its free from range is also being extended with a plant-based Farmhouse Foccacine in Waitrose and a Garlicky variant launching in Sainsbury’s and Ocado. They’re priced at £3 for 2 x 135g packs. Source: Birds BakeryIt’s vegan-friendly line-up comprises:Beetroot, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwich – £2.95Houmous & Roasted Red Pepper Sandwich – £2.80Savoury Rolls with Cranberries, Sweetcorn and Mixed Peppers – £1.25Mozzarisella and Tomato Sandwich – £2.80Mini Jam Doughnuts – 50pVegan Gingerbread Biscuits – £1.25last_img read more