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Sony creates flexible 99inch OLED panel

first_imgSony may have been the first of the big manufacturers to release an OLED TV, but the company has struggled to keep costs down while increasing the size of its OLED panels. They even stopped selling OLED TVs at one point. But OLED technology continues to progress, and Sony has just announced the development of a flexible OLED panel at SID 2012.The 9.9-inch display is still quite limited in terms of resolution, managing 960 x 540 and 111ppi, but this is a work in progress and that’s sure to improve. The good news is Sony manufactured the panel using a process that is easy to ramp up to volume production. That bodes well for this being a low cost solution.In order to create the flexible OLED panel Sony used a combination of glass substrates and film. Two glass substrates have a sheet of film attached to them. One of those films is used to hold the thin film transistors and white OLEDs, while the other has red, green, and blue color filters applied. The two films are then brought together and the glass substrates removed. The end result being a working film display that is capable of being flexed.Sony says that the display is a culmination of the work done in producing the company’s existing OLED panels. This flexible display has only just come off the production line though, and Sony didn’t have one at SID, rather they just had video footage of it in action.The next step is to test just how flexible and reliable the panel is. If they can improve on the resolution then it’s possible Sony could bring a device to market sporting a flexible display. As it’s OLED it also means power use will be very low, making it desirable for use in tablets and laptops.Read more at Tech-On!last_img read more

John Carmack its weird how close Xbox One and PS4 are

first_imgWith both Microsoft and Sony opting for x86 AMD hardware inside their next-generation consoles, there’s been a lot of speculation about how close in performance the two machines actually are. Rumors have suggested that the GPU inside the PS4 is more powerful, and there’s a lot more memory bandwidth. Digital Foundry even went so far as to create PCs to represent each console in order to compare them.There is no method of comparison to perfectly recreate the hardware without actually having the hardware to test. But some people are privy to details of the hardware ahead of launch, such as legendary engine developer John Carmack.If Carmack comments on hardware then you know that he’s looked at it in depth. And in the case of the PS4 and Xbox One, he knows the details of both under NDA and talked about them during his QuakeCon speech yesterday. His verdict? The machines are “essentially the same.”Carmack comments that it’s actually weird just how similar the two consoles are and wonders what kind of back room meetings went on that ultimately made that happen. He also points out that a few years ago we didn’t think AMD would be a major player in the games hardware market as Intel was touting Larrabee. But here we are, with AMD about to dominate the console market.As Carmack points out, having two machines that are essentially the same is actually great for developers as it cuts down on the work involved porting games. As we’ve said before, it’s also great for PC gamers as developers will essentially have a PC build when they complete the console versions of their games.So, regardless of what performance comparisons are done between now and the launch of the PS4 and Xbox One, we have it on good authority that the machines are the same regardless of slight differences in memory and GPU speeds. I get the feeling Carmack would choose to purchase a PS4, though. He isn’t a fan of Kinect and believes it has fundamental limitations with regards to framerate and latency. He goes on to say it’s like a “zero button mouse,” which is his way of explaining the motion controller is lacking as an interaction device–you want more control and it doesn’t offer that (yet).last_img read more