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Woman pleads guilty to stealing North Face jackets from McElhinneys

first_imgA young woman who stole two North Face jackets from McElhinney’s Stores in Ballybofey has been given the Probation Act. Sinead Browne appeared at Letterkenny District Court today charged with theft from the store in Ballybofey on May 5th, 2016. The court heard the 27-year-old woman entered the store, took the blue and black North Face jackets, valued at €280 in total, and left without paying.Security personnel at the store contacted the Gardai and having viewed CCTV footage, Ms Browne was tracked own and admitted to the offences.Neither of the jackets were ever recovered.The court was told that Ms Browne, of Milltown Court, Kilmacrennan, was a full-time carer for her partner.Judge Paul Kelly said he was told at a previous court sitting that Ms Browne may be able to compensate the store.However, the woman’s solicitor said she was surviving on her carer’s allowance and was not in a position to come up with any compensation.Judge Paul Kelly said that in the circumstances he would give Ms Browne the benefit of the Probation Act.Woman pleads guilty to stealing North Face jackets from McElhinneys was last modified: September 10th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:courtdonegaljacketMCELHINNEYSNorth Facetheftlast_img read more

Aviation industry in historic carbon offset accord

first_imgSome 65 countries have already signalled they will take part in the voluntary phase of an historic industry carbon offset accord to be phased in next decade.The International Civil Aviation Organisation’s 191 member states on Thursday agreed to implement the Carbon Offset and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) at the UN-organisation’s 39th Assembly.The world’s first global industry pollution agreement will start as a voluntary scheme from 2021 to 2026 but will then become mandatory across the aviation.Airlines will have to buy carbon credits to offset growth in emissions, a move that is expected to account for less than 2 per cent of revenues but has raised concerns in some states about costs.The scheme will include provisions to deal with special circumstances such as those of fast-growing airlines and airlines which have made significant investments to improve environmental performance already.Aviation accounts for about 2 percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions but the size of the aircraft fleet is expected to double over the next two decades.While the industry has been working to reduce carbon dioxide emissions through improved technology, more efficient operations and better flight planning, it needs the offset scheme to achieve its goal of carbon neutral growth from 2020.Parties that have indicated they will sign up for the voluntary scheme include Singapore, the Uhnited Arab Emirates, the US, European States and some smaller nations. However, Russia and India are among those who have said they will not participate in the first phase.“It has taken a great deal of effort and understanding to reach this stage, and I want to applaud the spirit of consensus and compromise demonstrated by our Member States, industry and civil society,” said  ICAO Council rresident Olumuyiwa Benard Aliu.  “We now have practical agreement and consensus on this issue backed by a large number of States who will voluntarily participate in the global market-based measure (GMBM) – and from its outset.“This will permit the CORSIA to serve as a positive and sustainable contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions reduction.”Airlines hailed the agreement as historic and an effective solution for airlines to manage their carbon footprint.“This agreement ensures that the aviation industry’s economic and social contributions are matched with cutting-edge efforts on sustainability,’’ International Air Transport Association director general  Alexandre de Juniac. “With CORSIA, aviation remains at the forefront of industries in combatting climate change.’’De Juniac described the enthusiasm and commitment of states in the voluntary period as impressive.“Even states that would normally not be required to participate—small island nations and developing economies—have shown their commitment by signing up,’’ he said. “The list of states volunteering for the first phase now numbers 65, giving CORSIA which we estimate will cover more than 80 per cent of growth post 2020. And we continue to encourage more states to join.’’US aircraft manufacturer Boeing said the move complemented an earlier agreement by ICAO to establish CO2 standards for aircraft emissions.”The market-based carbon-offset system and CO2 standard are integral to the four-pillar approach the industry is taking to stop the growth of emissions by 2020 and cut them in half by 2050 relative to 2005 levels,’’ Boeing said.  “These efforts also include: investing in new, more efficient aircraft; improving operational performance of the in-service fleet; improving the efficiency of air traffic management and other infrastructure; and scaling up the use of sustainable alternative fuels.’’However, some environmental groups have criticised the deal as inadequate.last_img read more

Piracy decline gives Somalis hope

first_imgSuspected pirates keep their hands in the air as directed by the guided-missile cruiser USS Vella Gulf as the visit, board, search and seizure team prepares to apprehend them. Vella Gulf is the flagship for Combined Task Force 151, a multi-national task force conducting counterpiracy operations to detect and deter piracy in and around the Gulf of Aden, Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean and Red Sea.(Image: Jason R Zalasky, US Navy) MEDIA CONTACTS • Obinna Anyadike  Editor-in-Chief, Irin  +254 20 7622 1343 RELATED ARTICLES • Co-operating to cut down piracy • Maritime piracy under the spotlight • Eye in the sky benefits society • SA women marine pilots make history • SA Agulhas in historic polar tripSource: Irin NewsRusting hulks of capsized boats decorate the waters around Berbera, a port city in the self-declared republic of Somaliland. Further down Somalia’s coast, pirates raid freighters in the Gulf of Aden. But efforts are under way to help Somalis make better use of their 3 300km coastline – the longest on the African continent – by increasing fishing and seafood exports to lucrative markets in the Middle East and Europe.In 2013, the EU will spend US$6.5-million (R57-million) to help Somaliland pursue its long-term goal of netting 120 000 tons of seafood each year, the sale of which could generate $1.2 billion (R10.5-billion) in foreign currency.“In Somalia, people have lived for a long time with their backs to the sea,” says Isabel Faria de Almedia, the EU development chief for Somalia. “It’s a country of agro-pastoralists with a strong nomadic tradition. We think there is a huge potential for the consumption and export of fish.”Until the second half of the 20th century, few Somalis outside fishing communities consumed fish and the sector was entirely artisanal in nature. This began to change in the 1970s with the development of better cold-storage facilities and the creation, with Soviet help, of an industrial fleet.But for want of spare parts and maintenance, these vessels quickly fell into disuse. See here for a detailed, if slightly dated, overview of the Somali fishing industry. Luring pirates away from piracyIn the middle of the last decade, Somali fishermen complained they were being forced into piracy by foreign trawlers operating illegally in waters claimed by Somalia.Coastal Somalis recount as a “eureka” moment the time self-appointed coastguards impounded a foreign trawler and levied a fine on its owners; they quickly realized seizing vessels was more lucrative than competing with commercial vessels for dwindling fish stocks.Amina Farah Arshe, who employs 40 fishermen aboard 11 vessels from Berbera, the main port of Somaliland, says fishing revenues could provide an alternative to raiding freighters far into the Indian Ocean.“We can stop it by empowering the people. We can stop it by giving jobs to the youth. People would make money, the government would collect tax revenues, and piracy would diminish,” she said. “But we need support. We need training, boats, fishing gear and cold storage.”For years, the UN has said that tackling Somali piracy should involve creating work for the jobless young Somalis who board skiffs, armed with assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades, to hunt vessels on the high seas.But only now has the security situation made this a realistic possibility. Somalia has recently selected its most viable president and government in years. Somali and AU forces have driven Al-Shabab insurgents from major cities.Out at sea, foreign warships and on-deck private security guards deter piracy. Only 70 raids took place in the first nine months of 2012, compared to 199 in the same period last year, according to the International Maritime Bureau. Logistical challengeSomalia’s new president, Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, says he wants to “increase local food production to end poverty forever”. Some 2.1-million people in the country are faced with hunger, particularly in the turbulent south.The future of large-scale fishing in Somali waters is tied up in a legal dispute over how far these waters extend from the country’s coastline.While the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which Somalia ratified in 1989, establishes 12 nautical miles from shore as an international norm for states’ territorial waters, Somalia has asserted sovereignty over seas up to 200 nautical miles from the coast. Mogadishu has resisted international pressure to declare these outer waters an exclusive economic zone, a designation that confers numerous rights to the country but falls short of full sovereignty.Alan Cole, who runs anti-piracy operations for the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, says Somaliland’s Berbera and Puntland’s Bosaso have real potential. But exporting fresh fish from the remote central coast – site of many pirate bases – offers a “logistical challenge”, he said.The UN agency spends $40-million (R351-million) each year tackling piracy, helping prosecute sea-borne raiders, training and equipping coastguards, creating jobs, and providing refrigerated trucks and storerooms to the fishing industry.“We need to get the fishing fleets of Somalia back to sea,” Cole said. “One of the challenges for fisherman is that the pirates will steal your fish. So you come back to the same issue of needing wider maritime security for Somalia so that the fishermen can safely make their living at sea.”last_img read more

Arunachal Minister’s son gets life term

first_imgA court in Arunachal Pradesh’s Lepa Rada district has convicted the son of State Industries Minister Tumke Bagra for murder and sentenced him to life imprisonment.Kajum Bagra had on the night of March 26, 2017, fatally shot the victim named Kenjum Kamsi outside a hotel in Aalo, the headquarters of West Siang district, after an argument. A CCTV camera installed outside the hotel had captured the incident. Bagra had pleaded not guilty to the charges for murder and violation of the Arms Act.last_img read more