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Charity welcomes new allergen labelling

first_imgCoeliac UK has welcomed new EU food labelling regulations, claiming they will provide better certainty for people with coeliac disease. The charity, which supports people who have the autoimmune disease cause by gluten, said it would help coeliacs manage their condition, and understand what products contain the allergen.Despite the change to regulations, the charity is still urging retailers to put a clear ‘gluten-free’ label on relevant products, to assure customers.Sarah Sleet, chief executive of Coeliac UK, said: “Making sure businesses provide clear, unambiguous information to customers enables people with coeliac disease to shop and eat out safely and confidently. The new regulation means people with coeliac disease will have a better understanding of whether the food they purchase from a supermarket or order at a food venue contains gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye.“Although the rules are a great step forward, for total peace of mind, we are encouraging all caterers and retailers to label food gluten-free to show their customers what they can eat without fear of cross-contamination.“Catering businesses will also benefit significantly as research shows people with coeliac disease – and the family and friends they eat out with – are worth a potential £100 million a year to venues willing to provide dishes labelled gluten-free. For businesses that have already taken up this option the impact on their bottom line is overwhelmingly positive.”The regulations become law on 13 December, and will require businesses to provide information about allergens, either on product ingredients lists on-pack, or in the establishment if it is not packaged.The new rules do not, however, require businesses to declare any risk of cross-contamination with gluten.The EU rules were published in 2011 to give food businesses three years to get ready for the new provisions.last_img read more

Vermont business expands national recycling programs

first_imgBrattleboro based business, Recycle Away has increased recycling at over200 corporations, universities and municipalities in the past 18 months.Recycle Away (www.recycleaway.com(link is external)) assists corporations such as Google,Hewlett Packard, Quaker Oats and Kellogg in ordering specialty containersfor corporate-wide recycling programs. Champlain College in Burlington VTrecently purchased several systems designed to serve a newly constructedLEED Certified student center. In October 2010 the State University of NYMedical Center dispersed hundreds of Recycle Away containers around campusand hospital floors.Municipalities around the country are stepping up recycling efforts onmain streets and city parks. Skagit County, WA, Galveston, TX andBrattleboro VT are three examples of communities with proudly printed logoson their public recycling systems; showcasing efforts to keep city blocksclean. Bins glazed in community colors, imprinted with personalized logos andclear signage are replacing retro-blue bins of the 90’s. Indoor andoutdoor containers alike are being used to brand champion recycling effortsin city parks, corporate settings, and commercial facilities.Recycle Away owner, Michael Alexander has spent the last 20 yearsanalyzing and writing policy for recycling agencies. He was a researchassistant for the National Recycling Coalition in Washington DC and aconsultant for the industry. He brings an understanding of the economicand environmental benefits’ recycling has for cities, states andorganizations.Alexander realizes that Americans generate 300 billion bottles and canseach year, most of which are disposed of away from home. Alexandertherefore built his business with the goal of collecting a substantialportion of those disposable beverage containers. ‘The need for public space recycling is gigantic,’ explainsAlexander. ‘Basically, everywhere there is a trash canâ ¦there should bea recycling container’. Recycle Away is on their way to making thathappen.Bring attractive and effective recycling systems to your business orcommunity. Visit www.recycleaway.com(link is external) or contact Michael Alexander at Source: Recycleaway. 2.8.2011last_img read more

Indian Muslim artisan fights virus slowdown with Hindu idols

first_imgThe Hindu festival traditionally ends with devotees leading massive processions to the Arabian Sea to immerse elaborately decorated figurines of the much-loved elephant god into the water.But this year’s celebrations are expected to be muted, with authorities in the virus-plagued city urging people to mark the 10-day festival at home in a bid to ensure social distancing.”As our pottery sales dwindled, I decided to make Ganesha statues… as a means of survival and also to promote environmentally friendly [alternatives],” 40-year-old Galwani told AFP.Activists have long criticized the practice of immersing the idols in the sea, arguing it contributes to water pollution, and Galwani agrees.  Topics : Since the coronavirus pandemic clobbered his pottery business, one Muslim artisan from India’s largest slum has turned to a Hindu god to revive his fortunes by making environmentally friendly Ganesha idols for an upcoming festival.Potter Yusuf Zakaria Galwani works with his two brothers in the Mumbai shanty town of Dharavi to create 13-inch-tall statues out of terracotta clay, counting on the god — who is revered as the remover of obstacles — to give his business a much-needed boost ahead of the celebrations.Ganesh Chaturthi — which kicks off on Saturday — is embraced with gusto in India’s financial hub.center_img “Every year, we see huge Ganesha statues made from plaster of Paris washing up on the shores after the immersion. This affects our local environment and marine life as well,” he said.His clay creations are designed to disintegrate quickly and turn into soil. They also contain a seed inside which can germinate if watered like a plant.Sold for 1,500 rupees ($20) each, Galwani has received orders for 800 statues so far and hopes to see his neighborhood bounce back economically after tackling the virus.Made famous by the 2008 Oscar-winner “Slumdog Millionaire”, Dharavi was thrown back into the spotlight in April over fears that the lack of social distancing or sanitation in its densely packed streets would make it an easy target for the virus.But a sharp focus on testing accompanied by tough quarantine and lockdown measures have seen infections plunge across the slum. “Previously I lost business as customers were wary of stepping into the slums,” Galwani said. “Now, things have changed and they’re willing to even come and pick up their own orders.” A third-generation potter, he said he saw no conflict in practicing his faith while catering to the needs of Hindu worshippers. “What’s the big deal if I am a Muslim making statues of Hindu deities like Ganesha? India is a secular democracy and we have grown up with many cultures living together,” Galwani added. Although officials have not issued an outright ban on sea immersions this year, they have imposed restrictions on local celebrations. Devotees are barred from making public offerings to the deity and organizers have been ordered to sanitize any outdoor marquees several times a day. India has registered over 2.6 million infections — the third-highest in the world — with western Maharashtra state, of which Mumbai is the capital, responsible for a fifth of coronavirus cases nationwide. Pandemic deaths across the country passed 50,000 on Monday.last_img read more