Blogs

Comprehensive African health initiative needed

first_imgAs Ebola hysteria dies down in the United States, the international community should not lose sight of a larger issue highlighted by the epidemic — the need to improve health care systems in the poorest African countries, writes Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) Professor Richard Marlink in new commentary. He advises world leaders to take their cues from the U.S. government’s President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) program.HSPH received a total of $362 million from the program for work in Botswana, Nigeria, and Tanzania that included training health care workers, developing monitoring and evaluation systems, strengthening health care infrastructures, and collaborating with local hospitals and clinics that provide treatment for AIDS patients. HSPH’s PEPFAR grants wound down in 2012, and researchers at the School worked with partner organizations to transition activities to full local ownership.Marlink, who is Bruce A. Beal, Robert L. Beal, and Alexander S. Beal Professor of the Practice of Public Health, helped launch and run HSPH’s PEPFAR efforts in Botswana. In his commentary, published November 14, 2014 on GlobalPost, Marlink describes lessons learned from PEPFAR’s success: Focus on outcomes, establish local partnerships, and leave countries better equipped to deal with other health issues. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Duke Energy supports youth literacy

first_imgThe Duke Energy Foundation provides philanthropic support to address needs vital to the health of our communities. Annually, the foundation funds approximately $2 million in charitable grants in Indiana. The Foundation’s investment priorities include K-to-career education, environment and community impact.Schools receiving Duke Energy 2018 summer reading program grants include: Plainfield, In. — Again this year, the Duke Energy Foundation is investing approximately $400,000 in Indiana youth statewide to improve literacy, including helping maintain and improve reading levels over the summer.“A child’s ability to read at grade level is one of the strongest indicators of whether that child will succeed in school and in life,” said Melody Birmingham-Byrd, Duke Energy state president for Indiana. “We are committed to supporting these summer reading programs that can give students the confidence they need to learn and grow.”In addition to school-year programs and reading summits, 18 Indiana schools are receiving grants ranging from approximately $6,000 to more than $25,000 for wide-ranging summer reading initiatives. (List of schools below.) The programs largely target students prior to third grade. Some examples include:Monroe County Community Schools – An immersive summer remedial reading program for struggling readers completing first and second grades. The program will also provide an intensive summer reading camp for identified at-risk children to keep them moving forward in their skills.Kokomo School Corporation – Will establish a four-week literacy camp for first- and second-grade students who are reading below grade level. The targeted students will receive a summer reading bag that includes 10 books and a “think sheet” for each book.Facts on reading and educationAccording to The Literacy Project:20 percent of Americans read below the level needed to earn a living wage50 percent of American adults cannot read a book written at the eighth-grade levelSix out of 10 American households do not buy a single book in an entire year85 percent of juvenile offenders have problems reading Clarksville Community School Corporation                              $16,000Crawford County Community School Corporation                   $19,500Decatur Community Schools                                                    $14,150Eastwood Elementary School                                                  $6,200Foundation of Monroe County Community Schools                 $23,655Greater Clark County Schools                                                 $19,150Hamilton Heights School Corporation                                      $25,257Kokomo School Corporation                                                    $24,722Lafayette School Corporation                                                   $23,824MSD Martinsville Schools                                                        $22,896Milan Community Schools Corporation                                    $19,187MSD of North Posey County                                                    $25,000New Castle Community School Corporation                            $8,205North Knox School Corporation                                               $25,000North Lawrence Community Schools                                       $14,776Salem Community Schools Corporation                                  $18,560South Vermillion Community Schools                                      $25,000Vigo County School Corporation                                              $24,394last_img read more

`Hikers and GCC Tigers storm to outdoor hockey titles

first_imgTHE PEPSI Hikers and the Georgetown Cricket Club (GCC) GBTI Tigers claimed exciting overall victories on Saturday afternoon in the Bounty- and Antonio’s Grille-sponsored Guyana Hockey Board One-Day Outdoor Tournament, which was held at the Guyana National Stadium in Providence.Seven male teams and five female sides battled in the 25-match event, which culminated in fading light.Seasoned players and skippers of both side, Robert France and Sonia Jardine, led from the front in the championship clash.In the male final, the Hikers were able to dominate against Bounty GCC– the Sequel. France scored in the seventh and 18th minutes of the clash to seal the game, but it could have been by a larger margin with the top club attacking in waves, which forced their opponent to defend with large numbers.On the other pitch, the older Tigers were able to outlast the younger GCC GBTI Spartans.As she has done over the years, Jardine made the difference. Collecting the ball just over the halfway spot, the 40-year-old turned on her marker and then beat two other defenders before she faked the goalie to push the ball into the uprights.Although there were several attempts by both sides, the fifth-minute first-half goal proved to be the decider.The female semi-final clashes were both one-sided affairs. After a 0-0 first half, the Spartans dominated Saints in their final-four battle. Abosaide Cadogan scored in the 14th and 18th minutes, while Diana Charles converted in the 16th minute.Meanwhile, the Tigers were able to get past the GCC GBTI Spice by a similar margin in their semi-final clash. Princessa Wilkie scored in the 6th and 12th minutes before Jardine sealed the game in the 17th minute of play.Both male semi-finals went to penalty flicks. The Hikers had a tough battle against the Bounty GCC Pitbulls. The eventual overall champions had to play catch up after Kevin Spencer had scored in the opening minute, but Aroydy Banford answered in the second half to take his team to the shootout, where they triumphed.The Sequel and YMCA Old Fort Carriers also battled to a draw (0-0), but the former were able to surge ahead in the shootout.Tigers’ Trisha Woodroffe was named the Most Valuable Player of the tournament, while the Spartans’ Sarah Matthias was adjudged the Most Promising Junior Female player.In the male division, Shaquon Favourite, from the YMCA Old Fort Warriors, was voted as the Most Promising Male player, while Rayon Brandford from the Hikers won the MVP award.last_img read more