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Election Night Live Blog

first_img5:19: Lab 181, Con 236, LD 36Report from the Union: Max Lewis of OCA standing on a table and claiming it was OCA campaigning that won Oxford West for the Tories. I’m off to bed. 4:54: Lab 162, Con 220, LD 35Some success for the Lib Dems at last, as they succeed in unseating Charles Clarke. That’s two former Labour Home Secretaries gone in one night. 4:51: Lab 157, Con 313, LD 33But Ed Balls survives. Just. 4:39: Lab 149, Con 198, LD 25Former Home Secretary Jacqui Smith has been defeated in Redditch by Tory Karen Lumley by a huge majority: 5821 votes. So Evan Harris can take comfort from the fact that he didn’t do as badly has her. But then Harris’s partner didn’t claim porn films on Parliamentary expenses. 4:35: Lab 145, Con 188, LD 28We now have the figures for Oxford West. Lib Dem Incumbent Evan Harris lost to Tory Nicola Blackwood by fewer than 200 votes: 23 730 to 23 906, on a 6.9% swing. A few hours ago I thought the Lib Dems might end up controlling both Oxford constituencies. Now they have neither. Not a good night for them at all. 4:23: Lab 138, Con 179, LD 28 –  Oxford West falls to ToriesNo figures yet, but Evan Harris of the Lib Dems has been defeated by the Conservatives in Oxford West. 4:16: Lab 133, Con 168, LD 26Now just two of us left in the JCR. And the other one is asleep. 4:14 Lab 130 Con 166, LD 26‘Let’s speak now to two stars of the apprentice.’ God, the BBC are getting desperate. 4:08: Lab 122, Con 155, LD 23We’ve reached the halfway point, with 330 seats now declared. 4:10 is an exceptionally late time to reach the halfway point. Vernon Bogdanor again, claiming to know how David Cameron is feeling: ‘I knew David Cameron extremely well as an undergraduate.’ Dimbleby is giving the impression more and more that Bogdanor is there not so much to explain hung Parliaments as to explain Cameron. 3:49: Lab 114, Con 133, LD 22There’s going to be a recount of the Tory and Lib Dem vote in Oxford West and Abingdon, so we can’t expect a result for a while. 3:31: Lab 112, Con 104, LD 15 –  Oxford East Held by LabourMore bad news for the Lib Dems – Andrew Smith has managed to hold on in Oxford East, defeating Steve Goddard of the Lib Dems by 21,938 to 17,357. And we thought Cherwell’s endorsement would ensure victory for him…Oxford Town Hall exploded when the result was called. The sizeable, and severely sleep-deprived, OULC contingent were clearly delighted that it had gone their way.Smith thanked the students who had been involved in the campaign. He felt that their support in the previous “months and years had been really key to our victory here.”He also commented that “in the student wards I think there were far more votes for me and the Labour Party than people, including the student newspapers, were expecting.”3:30: Con 103, Lab 100, LD 14As an illustration of how disappointing tonight is for the Lib Dems, Lembit Opic, he of the asteroids and the Cheeky Girls, has lost his seat. Come to think of it, some Lib Dems might not consider Opik’s loss so disappointing after all. Nick Robinson: ‘there’s no doubt he [Cameron] will be very disappointed.’3:23: Lab 98, Con 92, LD 14Paxman’s citing reports that the Labour party is already talking to the Lib Dems about coalition or co-operation. They, by the way, are having a torrid night, and are already one seat down among those which have declared. Lib Dem dreams of 100+ MPs, or of coming second in the popular vote, are rapidly disappearing. 3:20: Lab 89, Con 87, LD 13Vernon Bogdanor, Professor of Government at Brasenose, has just been interviewed on the BBC for the third or fourth time tonight. Bogdanor’s a big dog in the political world, but is particularly in demand tonight, both because he tutored David Cameron while he was at Oxford and because he is the world’s leading expert on the British constitution, and so one of the best people to explain what might happen in the event of a hung parliament. He says Cameron was one of the best students he’s taught, and also that he’s cool and calm under pressure, which, he says, is essential in a politician. Paxman then goes on to bully a poor Tory candidate into talking about coalitions, which he resolutely refuses to do.  3:09: Lab 87, Con 79, LD 10The Union is thinning out as people go back to their colleges, but the Cherwell team is still at work, the editors finalising tomorrow’s edition in the offices and reporters waiting at Oxford Town Hall for the results announcement, which should come some time in the next hour. A press officer told us earlier in the evening that they were expecting to be able to announce by about 2:30, but the turnout has been so great that the count is taking much longer than originally anticipated. A dozen or so people are still watching in my JCR, fighting off sleep. We’ll see how many make it to the morning. 1:58: Lab 31, Con 15, LD 4Results coming thick and fast now. Fierce booing in the Macmillan room as Gordon Brown was re-elected, and plenty of shouts of ‘down with Brown.’ The Goodman library downstairs is much more subdued, apart from the people climbing in through the windows to avoid the £4 charge. It’s not looking like quite the night the Lib Dems were hoping for. 1:07: Lab 5, Con 2, LD 1The first Tory gain of the night comes in Kingswood, and the OUCA boys immediately launch into a rousing rendition of God Save the Queen, as a certain ex-president standing on a table necks champagne from the bottle. You have to see it to believe it. 00:25: Lab 3, Con 0, LD 0 Overheard in the Macmillan Room as Sunderland Central declared for Labour: ‘fucking socialists.’A press officer at Oxford Town Hall tells me that the Oxford East results should come through some time after 2am. Turnout has been much higher than normal, but there were none of the fights or queues that happened in other constituencies. There’s a small gaggle of Labour Club people hanging around outside the counting room, but nothing like as large as the huge OCA crowd at the Union. Lib Dems nowhere to be seen, apart from Henry Curr. 23:35: Lab 2, Con 0, LD 0The Union has been nominally divided into three areas for supporters of the three political partielast_img read more

Dishing and Swishing: NBA is perfect platform for social justice

first_imgHowever, the players in the bubble have made it well known that they are playing for more than just the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy. Players are motivated beyond their drive to win. They’re playing for justice. All of this has raised the following questions for some: Do we even need sports at all right now? Should successful athletes speak on pertinent issues unrelated to sports while on the court? Should we even mix sports and social justice initiatives together? It’s also hard to fathom why people think it’s okay to watch, bet on and root for Black athletes on the court but not support them as Black people off the court, as Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell said in a tweet in June. What I really want to say with this column, though, is that sports not only brings people together, but as we are witnessing perhaps most prominently with the NBA, sports can be used as a vehicle to spread awareness and support social justice initiatives. The main thing that the NBA Players Association wanted during negotiations on the NBA restart with regard to social justice was to have the players’ voices heard not for publicity reasons but because they knew that their high-profile stature will make fans listen to their words. Kneeling spreads awareness. Speaking out during press conferences — like Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart did in July — spreads awareness. Sending out tweets calling for change spreads awareness. One of my favorite things about sports is that it can always bring people together. The pandemic and social justice movement have revealed deep-rooted ideological differences in the public sphere. Our country has arguably become more divided than it has ever been before. Sports, on the other hand, is nonpartisan: You don’t have to belong to a certain political party to shoot some hoops or watch basketball. Team sports, especially, are all about communication, cooperation, teamwork and perseverance. Amid the chaos of 2020 — including the way-too-long sports shutdown — the NBA restart at Walt Disney World has been so exciting and fast-paced that each game feels like March Madness. Each team is playing with so much energy, it’s like their seasons were never even suspended in the first place. These comments cannot be more insular. Numbers don’t lie: Black men are 2.5 times as likely to be shot and killed by police than their white counterparts. The killings of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and most recently the shooting of Jacob Blake have reignited the Black Lives Matter movement that has been prioritized by the NBA and its players this season more than virtually any in the league’s history. So when athletes like James make such comments, they are making them from the perspective of a Black person in the United States, period. Wealth does not change one’s race. The argument that Black athletes are somehow immune to police brutality due to the size of their pockets is invalid.  The answers: Yes, yes and yes. Since the beginning of the NBA restart, I’ve seen a lot of posts about players advocating for the Black Lives Matter movement on my Instagram feed. But within the comment sections of these posts, I’ve seen a lot more hate toward these athletes for speaking out against racial injustice. Many of these comments have to do with the notion that it doesn’t make sense for NBA players to say that they’re “scared as Black men” in this country — like LeBron James said Monday night — since they are high-profile, wealthy athletes, and that victims of police shootings “should have just complied” with the officers at the scene to avoid violence. “BLACK LIVES MATTER” is printed above center court each game and players have messages such as “Equality” and “Peace” written above their jersey numbers and on their sneakers. The subject of many postgame press conferences has been diverted away from basketball entirely and toward the pressing issue of racial injustice in this country. Although my New York Knicks are (unsurprisingly) not competing in the playoffs right now and I’m not rooting for any team in particular to be crowned this tumultuous season’s champion, I find it extremely important to hear what NBA players have to say about the recent shooting of Blake, who was shot in the back seven times by a police officer in Kenosha, Wis. in front of his own children. After all, they have the platform — and they have all the right in the world — to make a difference. Shawn Farhadian is a sophomore writing about sports. His column, “Dishing and Swishing,” runs every other Wednesday.last_img read more

Lindsay Eastwood’s overtime goal gives Syracuse its first win, 5-4 over Lindenwood

first_img Published on October 19, 2018 at 10:41 pm Contact KJ: [email protected] | @KJEdelman With 80 seconds left in overtime, Lindsay Eastwood scored her first goal of the season to give Syracuse (1-3, 1-2 College Hockey America) its first conference victory against Lindenwood (1-4, 0-1), 5-4, Friday in St. Charles, Missouri.SU recovered from a two-goal deficit with under 10 minutes left in the third period, netting three goals in a 2 minute and 7-second span. But the Orange lost their lead with less than four minutes left. Eastwood’s goal 3:20 into overtime helped SU avoid its worst CHA start since its inaugural season in 2008.Syracuse opened the game attacking with seven shots on goal in the first eight minutes, all of them saved by Lions’ goalie Jolene deBruyn. And when a Shelby Calof hooking penalty gave Lindenwood an early advantage, the Orange didn’t allow a shot on the power play. With two minutes left, SU capitalized on its first power-play of the day off of an Abby Moloughney goal, the first of her collegiate career. The Orange’s defense persisted in the first, outshooting LWU 21-8, and Moloughney’s score put SU on top. But Lindenwood responded on its first shot of the second period. A Cierra Paisley goal, her first of the season, from Taylor Kirwan tied the game at one apiece. The Lions followed their first score with a quick power play, but after three-straight shots they fell short. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textA minute after that advantage was wasted, the Lions recovered and beat SU goalie Ady Cohen again off a goal from Courtney Ganske. A power play 12 minutes into the period gave Syracuse a chance to equalize, but after recording six unanswered shots, it couldn’t score. Lindenwood converted two-thirds of its on-target shots in the second, turning its 1-0 deficit to a 2-1 lead. The Lions made the game 3-1 after a Jada Burke goal halfway through the third, but the Orange weren’t finished. SU and LWU traded shots for the next three minutes with the Orange down two. Eventually, SU’s Jessica DiGirolamo found the back of the net to cut the lead to one.Thirty-seven seconds later, Emma Polaski responded, netting her first score of the season to tie it at three. Lindenwood’s Maddison Stitt was penalized with tripping during the goal, and the Orange entered the next two minutes up a player.After a Sierra Burt shot, SU’s captain Allie Munroe controlled the puck. The defender wound back her stick and scored on deBruyn with less than 30 seconds left in the power play. The goal gave SU a 4-3 lead. But with under 4 minutes left in the period, Lindenwood responded with a Taylor Girard short-handed goal to tie it back at 4-4. Time was ticking down with less than two minutes left in overtime when Eastwood scored her first goal of the season, giving the Orange their first victory of the season. The Orange outshot LWU, 72-37, dominating on the offensive end in the third period. For 50 minutes of play, it looked like SU would spoil its shot output. But it didn’t. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more