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Studying art by making it

first_imgHistorically, Harvard has valued the head over the hand, but that may soon shift — at least in one discipline.Under the auspices of Jennifer L. Roberts, the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, and Ethan Lasser, Theodore E. Stebbins Jr. Curator of American art at the Harvard Art Museums, graduate students, particularly those in art history, are joining a University movement against what Roberts calls a “longstanding, multi-century bias toward conceptual and mathematical, verbal, abstract forms of knowledge over the forms of knowledge embedded in making.”As their class “Minding Making: Art History and Artisanal Intelligence” goes through its second iteration, students are learning how hands-on experience with materials and processes feeds a different kind of awareness and a new appreciation of the finished product.Part of a larger project, detailed at mindingmaking.org, the class follows several summer graduate workshops, as well as a broader trend toward recognizing art-making as part of the University’s “cognitive life,” said Roberts. “The humanities are in the middle of what’s known as the material turn,” she explained. “There’s a lot of interest in matter and materiality, but that hasn’t really yet translated into a clear new way of thinking about making, about interacting with all that material.”,“Maker is a generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship.” — Professor Jennifer Roberts, pictured below with Ethan Lasser,This course seeks to address this tactical way of thinking, with readings on the intellectual history of crafts, as well as visits to artists, artisans, and their workplaces, including an aluminum casting factory.“Maker,” Roberts explained, is a “generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship. Art historians tend not to go to factories. They’re not interested in mass production. There are a lot of assumptions about what someone does.”“Art history,” added Lasser, “is constructed around a finished object, and the power of this approach is in going back through it and understanding what it takes to get to that object.”In Roberts’ words, the practitioners seek to “get outside the library and books for sources of knowledge.” Lasser elaborated, explaining that the goal of the course is to provide “a sense of the feel, the tactile knowledge, of how much physical labor goes into something.”“At every stage,” he said, “there’s some information that art historians don’t generally write about because they don’t know about, because they’re just looking at the finished object.”,On a stormy Friday, students were involved in another element of the course, trying their hands at etching: from the first preparation of the plates through printing. The work is laborious, and students such as Destiny Crowley of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences were spending considerable time applying the thick black ink and then wiping it nearly off before attempting to print a first proof.Speaking while she worked, Crowley, a first-year student in the history of art and architecture Ph.D. program, explained that she signed on to address “a gaping lack in my education when it came to the actual creation of art.” As she wiped the viscous ink over her plate, she noted how that also gave her additional insight into works she has long admired: the Blank Signs series of prints by artist Ed Ruscha, who hails from her home state of Oklahoma.“The aquatint gives the print a very light shade of coloring,” Crowley explained, describing Ruscha’s series. “And the signs themselves are left stark white.” Noting “the juxtaposition of moving from darkness to light, the pitch black of the ink, the deep blackish brown of the asphaltum ground that we had to apply to the plate,” she said, “I find it very interesting that the print ended up being such a bold interplay of lightness.”Working with the coal-black ink, she shared her insight. “It is really amazing how you can go from a really onyx black — almost a void on this space — and strip that away,” she said. “There’s a reason why artists choose the artistic processes they do, an etching versus an oil painting.”,“There are so many different reasons for choosing a material,” agreed Iain Gordon, who is pursuing a master’s in design studies. Unlike several of his classmates, Gordon, who was drying a treated plate, has been involved on the “making” side, building furniture as well as other projects for several years. “For me, this is a way to engage with the making in a theoretical and critical way,” he said.“I knew it would be time-consuming and unpredictable and a different kind of mental and physical energy,” said Rachel Vogel, who is in her second year of the Ph.D. program in the history of art and architecture. “But you don’t realize the extent of all of those things until you really start doing it.“Learning those kinds of chains of causality and being able to recognize how a particular choice an artist made might be a response to something else that’s happening in the print …” She paused as she continued to wipe ink off her etching plate. “To begin to unpack the layers that must have happened in order for the artist to have constructed a plate is something that really can only happen once you’ve had the experience of making prints yourself.”last_img read more

Cricket News Ishant Sharma Looked More Of A Batsman Than Me: Hanuma Vihari

first_imgHanuma Vihari smashed his maiden Test century.Ishant Sharma also scored his first Test fifty.Ishant and Vihari shared a 112-run stand for the eighth wicket. New Delhi: West Indies bowlers were looking to capitalise with the second new ball on day 2 of the Sabina Park Test. Jason Holder gave them a good start by dismissing Rishabh Pant for 27 but Hanuma Vihari found magnificent support from Ishant Sharma and the duo stitched a 112-run stand for the eighth wicket. Ishant scored his maiden fifty in his 126th Test innings while Vihari finally scored his maiden century. Speaking after the match, Vihari said the credit for his maiden ton should go to Ishant who batted with confidence. “Happy that I got a century and credit should go to Ishant. He looked more like a batsman today than me. The way he was going, we kept discussing what the bowler was doing and his experience really helped. My dad passed away when I was 12 so ever since, I have decided that when I play international cricket I want to dedicate my first hundred to him. When I was batting overnight on 42, I did not sleep really well as my thoughts were obviously running on how to get a big score today. I’m really happy that I could get my first hundred, especially on those conditions. It gives me a lot of satisfaction,” Vihari said.The right-hander had said that although India scored 416, the scoreboard did not reflect how well West Indies bowled. “I was batting at 84 during lunchtime, then it took me hard to get to the nineties. We have to give credit to the bowlers as well. Even though we scored 416 runs that do not show the way they bowled,” Vihari said.Also Read | Jason Holder Breaks THIS Massive Record Of Sir Gary Sobers To Script History For West IndiesVihari and Ishant’s partnership helped India cross 400 and Jasprit Bumrah used the pitch to good effect to take 6/16 in nine overs of brilliant fast bowling. The haul also included a hat-trick which made Bumrah the third Indian bowler after Harbhajan Singh and Irfan Pathan to achieve the feat. Vihari heaped praise on Bumrah’s splendid effort.Also Read | Jasprit Bumrah will be indebted to Virat Kohli for the hat-trick: Harbhajan Singh”We bowled brilliantly, to be honest. The way Bumrah and all the other bowlers bowled, we stuck to our guns. We don’t know what the game plan is. So, the first thing will be to get them out as soon as possible. Then the management will decide whether we bat or bowl,” Vihari said. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.center_img highlightslast_img read more

Bosnian watched Football Match at Goodison Park at the invitation of Everton

first_imgYoung BH citizen, Aldin Karabeg, managed to realize his dream and attend one match of the English Premier League after three months.This young man in July sent inquires to up to 92 clubs in England, with a simple question: “Why would I cheer for you?”Wanting to choose a club from Premier League, for which he would cheer in the future, Karabeg received answers to his letters and read answers from some of the world’s biggest clubs, such as Manchester United, Chelsea or Arsenal.Despite the fact that all the answers were really good, Aldin decided to choose Everton which, according to him, offered the best answer. Of course, the message from Muhamed Besic, BH football player that he sent to Aldin, contributed to all of this.However, that was not it for Aldin, who quickly attracted attention of English media, who followed his unusual little action. After he announced his decision, soon came the offer to turn his interesting story into a movie, which is why Aldin had the opportunity to fulfill his dream and attend the match Everton – Crystal Palace, which was played at the stadium Goodison Park.On that occasion, Aldin said to the media that he is really delighted with the atmosphere in the stadium and fan songs, and he cannot wait for the match to begin.“There is 40,000 people on the stands, and it’s roughly the population of the city where I live. It’s amazing to see all these people in one place and I think this is a dream come true,” said Karabeg from Goodison Park.(Source: Radiosarajevo.ba)last_img read more