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Studying art by making it

first_imgHistorically, Harvard has valued the head over the hand, but that may soon shift — at least in one discipline.Under the auspices of Jennifer L. Roberts, the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, and Ethan Lasser, Theodore E. Stebbins Jr. Curator of American art at the Harvard Art Museums, graduate students, particularly those in art history, are joining a University movement against what Roberts calls a “longstanding, multi-century bias toward conceptual and mathematical, verbal, abstract forms of knowledge over the forms of knowledge embedded in making.”As their class “Minding Making: Art History and Artisanal Intelligence” goes through its second iteration, students are learning how hands-on experience with materials and processes feeds a different kind of awareness and a new appreciation of the finished product.Part of a larger project, detailed at mindingmaking.org, the class follows several summer graduate workshops, as well as a broader trend toward recognizing art-making as part of the University’s “cognitive life,” said Roberts. “The humanities are in the middle of what’s known as the material turn,” she explained. “There’s a lot of interest in matter and materiality, but that hasn’t really yet translated into a clear new way of thinking about making, about interacting with all that material.”,“Maker is a generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship.” — Professor Jennifer Roberts, pictured below with Ethan Lasser,This course seeks to address this tactical way of thinking, with readings on the intellectual history of crafts, as well as visits to artists, artisans, and their workplaces, including an aluminum casting factory.“Maker,” Roberts explained, is a “generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship. Art historians tend not to go to factories. They’re not interested in mass production. There are a lot of assumptions about what someone does.”“Art history,” added Lasser, “is constructed around a finished object, and the power of this approach is in going back through it and understanding what it takes to get to that object.”In Roberts’ words, the practitioners seek to “get outside the library and books for sources of knowledge.” Lasser elaborated, explaining that the goal of the course is to provide “a sense of the feel, the tactile knowledge, of how much physical labor goes into something.”“At every stage,” he said, “there’s some information that art historians don’t generally write about because they don’t know about, because they’re just looking at the finished object.”,On a stormy Friday, students were involved in another element of the course, trying their hands at etching: from the first preparation of the plates through printing. The work is laborious, and students such as Destiny Crowley of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences were spending considerable time applying the thick black ink and then wiping it nearly off before attempting to print a first proof.Speaking while she worked, Crowley, a first-year student in the history of art and architecture Ph.D. program, explained that she signed on to address “a gaping lack in my education when it came to the actual creation of art.” As she wiped the viscous ink over her plate, she noted how that also gave her additional insight into works she has long admired: the Blank Signs series of prints by artist Ed Ruscha, who hails from her home state of Oklahoma.“The aquatint gives the print a very light shade of coloring,” Crowley explained, describing Ruscha’s series. “And the signs themselves are left stark white.” Noting “the juxtaposition of moving from darkness to light, the pitch black of the ink, the deep blackish brown of the asphaltum ground that we had to apply to the plate,” she said, “I find it very interesting that the print ended up being such a bold interplay of lightness.”Working with the coal-black ink, she shared her insight. “It is really amazing how you can go from a really onyx black — almost a void on this space — and strip that away,” she said. “There’s a reason why artists choose the artistic processes they do, an etching versus an oil painting.”,“There are so many different reasons for choosing a material,” agreed Iain Gordon, who is pursuing a master’s in design studies. Unlike several of his classmates, Gordon, who was drying a treated plate, has been involved on the “making” side, building furniture as well as other projects for several years. “For me, this is a way to engage with the making in a theoretical and critical way,” he said.“I knew it would be time-consuming and unpredictable and a different kind of mental and physical energy,” said Rachel Vogel, who is in her second year of the Ph.D. program in the history of art and architecture. “But you don’t realize the extent of all of those things until you really start doing it.“Learning those kinds of chains of causality and being able to recognize how a particular choice an artist made might be a response to something else that’s happening in the print …” She paused as she continued to wipe ink off her etching plate. “To begin to unpack the layers that must have happened in order for the artist to have constructed a plate is something that really can only happen once you’ve had the experience of making prints yourself.”last_img read more

Lambert heaps praise on Benteke

first_img Press Association Benteke, an £8million summer signing from Genk, chalked up his 16th goal of the campaign during the weekend win at Reading to lift Villa out of the Barclays Premier League bottom three. The last Villa player to reach the 20-goal mark was Juan Pablo Angel during the 2003-04 season and Benteke has nine games remaining in which to reach that milestone. Lambert said: “If he gets 20 goals, then he’s doing something good for us. The big guy, over the course of the whole season, has been excellent for someone just 22 years of age.” Aston Villa manager Paul Lambert has hailed the impact of striker Christian Benteke, who is bidding to become the first player in nearly a decade to score 20 goals in a season for the club.center_img He added: “I don’t need to say much to Christian. He is a young guy still learning but his performances have been exceptional. He has been massive to us and also scores goals for a very talented Belgium side. “For his age, he has played so many big games already, internationals, and it looks like Belgium will qualify for the World Cup. The lad knows big-time football but whatever you can do to help him, then you will speak to him.” If successful, Benteke would become only the eighth Villa player since their First Division title winning season in 1980-81 to reach the 20-goal mark. Peter Withe achieved it three times in four seasons between 1980 and 1984 and strike partner Gary Shaw managed the same feat twice in the same period. Simon Stainrod (1985-86) and Alan McInally (1988-89) were followed by two players who twice struck 20 goals in former England skipper David Platt (1989-90, 1990-91) and Dwight Yorke (1995-96, 1996-97). Colombian international Angel clocked up 23 goals during 2003-04. Another Villa striker in record-signing Darren Bent is stepping up his attempts to return to fitness after an ankle problem. Lambert said: “Darren is doing all right but is not quite ready. He is doing a bit of running which is better than he has been for the last few weeks. We will see how he is this week with his rehab.” last_img read more

Pini Yakuel: Optimove – Betting Industry’s altered marketing agenda requires a real-time rethink

first_imgShare Submit Related Articles StumbleUpon GVC expands Optimove CRM dynamics across global group portfolio July 4, 2019 Optimove upgrades customer journey ‘self-optimisation’ capacities August 6, 2020 Share Optimove expands real-time dynamics to help betting meet new marketing demands August 27, 2019 Pini Yakuel – OptimoveExpanding its ‘Marketing Hub’ provisions, Optimove a leading supplier of customer retention and campaign optimisation tools for mass-market enterprises, announced a raft of real-time functions customised for betting marketing teams.  Detailing initiatives to SBC audiences, Optimove CEO Pini Yakuel underlines the importance of betting operators building-up their real-time capacities, as marketing leadership can no longer think statically on customer engagement, facing a board agenda of live dynamics such as player behaviour, care-of-duty and social responsibility interactions…______________ SBC: Pini thanks for this interview. As a marketing technology Optimove services a number of mass-market industries. However, why has Optimove, chosen to build specific components for betting marketing incumbents?  Pini Yakuel (CEO – Optimove): We are proud to be recognized as the preferred CRM solution for the gaming industry. We have always anticipated the needs of our clients and been able to identify how our technology can answer those needs. Over the past few months, we have seen the need for realtime capabilities increase. True to our commitment to staying ahead of the curve, it was only natural that we develop realtime capabilities to support our clients’ evolving marketing requirements.SBC: In your press update, you detail that you want to help industry operators make better ‘informed decisions’ through real-time dynamics. What does this actually entail? PY: As we always say, marketing has three sides. The first is data collection and curation; the second is activation or campaigns, and the third is measurement and optimization.On the data side, we provide a combination of fast and slow data. Most data used for profile creation, segmentation and predictive modelling is historical data, and therefore these processes are non-realtime by nature. We call them “Slow Data”. Real-time engagement using live signals is what we call “Fast Data”. Fast data, such as realtime web and mobile interactions, complement customer profiles by providing the marketer with the context needed in order to make an informed decision. What Optimove is adding now is the combination of realtime, historical, and predictive data.For example – if we know that a certain player or bettor is a bonus seeker, and we see they are currently playing roulette, the marketer now has the tools to trigger a campaign which is different than the one that would be triggered for a VIP.Additionally, Operators need to gain insight into the impact of each of their campaigns, or a sequence of them, on any business KPI. In our newest release, our Streams feature was enhanced with new capabilities now enabling users to measure the joint impact of a sequence of realtime and scheduled campaigns. Streams complement Optimove’s pre-existing offering of single campaign measurement.Together, these capabilities provide valuable insight to operators empowering them to make better-informed decisions based on the intelligence they gain on their players and the effectiveness of their past and current marketing activities.SBC: At a marketing and operations level, why have real-time dynamics been so hard to achieve or execute for betting operators?  PY: Traditionally, realtime dynamics have been managed from the iGaming platforms, that are separated from CRM systems. This has created an operational challenge since it required marketers to manage, connect, and measure their campaigns without seeing the full picture. Optimove’s new realtime technology enables marketers to overcome these obstacles by centralizing the required capabilities under one roof. SBC: How do you envision your new Marketing Hub provisions, tackling the complexities of the industry’s social responsibility and compliance demands across multiple markets placed on marketing teams?   PY: We are extremely aware of the need marketing teams have when it comes to complying with regulation. We are committed to helping them provide a secure and safe entertainment environment for their players.These new real-time capabilities are built on top of our robust player modelling and orchestration technologies, enabling the full control over each and every player’s experience. As an example, marketers can allocate players into an ‘always exclude’ segment, isolating them from receiving promotions from the operator. This segment can contain players that have been identified by the operators’ own tools, Optimove’s proprietary predictive algorithms, or people who have exceeded their communication limits.SBC: As a tech and marketing stakeholder, can the sector’s compliance demands simply be addressed by technology developments… Are shortcomings simply down to tech limitations?PY: t’s not about technology solving compliance demands, it’s about technology empowering operators to provide safe environments to their players. I once compared AI to Ironman’s suit, for the armour and support it provides the human in it. I’d rather look at technology as exactly that—technology is an enabler, not an easy-fix solution to any issue.Looking at responsible gaming models only as a means to meet compliance regulations, misses the mark. Responsible gaming models should be created by the industry’s desire to create safe environments and top-quality experiences for players. Technology is the means to that end. It’s not the ultimate goal.SBC: Finally, focusing on real-time dynamics and intelligence, what future marketing challenges lay in the horizon for industry stakeholders… PY: In this fast-paced, ever-changing industry, it seems like the future is already here. The competition for players’ time and engagement is growing and the players themselves are evolving. Operators will be required to invest more and more in order to attract new players and earn their loyalty. This can only be overcome if operators look at their marketing through the lens of relationship building. In order to succeed in this task, industry stakeholders must face the fact that historical, predictive and realtime data cannot live in siloed spaces. To maximize the impact of realtime dynamics and intelligence, operators will need all three data types operating in unison within one interface. As challenging as this seems, the adoption of solutions such as Customer Data Platforms within the industry might be what the future entails.The combination of historical customer data with realtime interactions is paramount to improve player experiences. In the not-too-distant future players will expect operators to empower them to create their own journeys. These player-led journeys differ from marketing defined player journeys as they’re infinite and non-linear. With this in mind, technology providers will need to lift the burden off marketers by supporting self-optimizing journeys that compare between competing actions across touch-points and aim to deliver the most appropriate and effective message to each player at any moment in time. While operators need to jump the proverbial hurdle and trust the machine to orchestrate at scale.__________________Pini Yakuel – CEO – Optimovelast_img read more

Diego Costa – I don’t go looking for trouble, but I’m no cry baby with trouble finds me

first_img Chelsea striker Diego Costa Chelsea bad boy striker Diego Costa insists he doesn’t go around looking for trouble, but says he is no ‘cry-baby’ when trouble finds him.The 27-year-old is famed for his combative style of play and his apparent skill of rubbing up his opponents the wrong way on the pitch.His antics have landed him in trouble in the past, with the Spain international handed three-match bans for tussles with Liverpool’s Emre Can and, this season, Arsenal duo Laurent Koscielny and Gabriel Paulista.Manager Jose Mourinho has often come out in defence of his front-man, but Costa has spoken of the respect he has for his opponents and rejects suggestions he runs around the pitch looking for a scrap.When asked if there is anything he fears, the Chelsea star said: “Just God.“I think If you fear someone, another person it is not a good thing. I respect. I have respect for my parents, my wife, my daughter and God.“But respect, not fear. I don’t have fear. I have respect. For example, if there is a massive guy and he comes over and we are going to have a problem, I don’t get involved with him.“I don’t fear him but I respect him.“Am I as tough off the pitch as I am on it? Not really no. I am completely different off the pitch.”A sensation following his £32million arrival from Atletico Madrid last summer, Costa netted 20 Premier League goals in his debut campaign, but the hard man forward’s recent struggles up front are perhaps reflected in Chelsea’s struggles at a team, having netted just twice as the defending champions sit 12th in the table.But Costa insists, while others berate his aggressive style and criticise his lack of form, he is ‘not really bothered’ by the words of his critics.“I have 100 per cent support from my manager, from the club and from the Chelsea fans,” Costa told the Daily Mirror.“So other people, other opinions, I don’t care, I’m not really bothered. I will not change unless my manager or the people from my club or my supporters tell me so.“No, I don’t need to change. Because I have done nothing wrong. “During my football career, many, many times other players have done stuff to me, like kick me but I am not a cry baby.” 1last_img read more