Blogs

University professors recognised by Queen

first_imgTwo Oxford University professors have been awarded the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for higher and further education.Vice-Chancellor Andrew Hamilton and David MacDonald CBE, founder of Oxford’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, received the prize in recognition of Oxford University’s conservation research. WildCRU attempt to achieve practical solutions to conservation issues, describing their approach as “empirical, interdisciplinary and collaborative.”The prize was awarded on 24th February by the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh in a Buckingham Palace ceremony. Each recipient received a silver gilt medal and certificate signed by the Queen.Other winners included the universities of Nottingham, St Andrews, Plymouth and Surrey. Oxford University was awarded the prize for the eighth time, more than any other university.The Royal Anniversary Trust chairman said, “At a time when the higher and further education sectors are under so much pressure, the winners highlight the fantastic depth and breadth of research being undertaken at institutions right across the UK.last_img read more

Publix Tests Self Checkout Lanes in South Florida Stores

first_imgThe system has proven popular with customers at other big retail stores such as Walmart and Target.Publix spokeswoman Nicole Krauss adds, “We’re always evaluating how to best serve our customers and self-checkout is one of those considerations when we’re looking at remodels,” although she did not say whether this was a test or how many other stores would be installing the new equipment. A Florida-based retail chain is integrating technology geared toward giving customers greater control over their shopping experience.Publix recently installed self-checkout registers at several stores in South and Central Florida.Two locations in Coconut Creek and Coral Springs added the new registers earlier this month. They replaced the express checkout lanes located next to the customer service desk. Two employees stand by, ready to assist customers with purchases and to explain how the machines work.A store located at 7060 West Palmetto Park Road in Boca Raton has had the self-checkout option for several years.Company spokesman Dwaine Stevens says, “We are constantly evaluating how to best serve our customers.”last_img read more

Train Hits Two Vehicles in Lake Worth Beach; One Person Reportedly Injured

first_imgEight people were involved in the accident, one of whom was injured, according to fire officials. The person, an adult woman, was taken to a local trauma hospital. Palm Beach County Fire Rescue officials report that a Tri-Rail train hit two vehicles Thursday evening on the tracks at 6th Avenue South near the I-95 overpass in Lake Worth Beach.The crash happened at 6:34 p.m.Both the eastbound and westbound lanes are shut down.I-95 off-ramp right lanes were blocked, according to 511.com.The tracks serve both Tri-Rail and freight trains.last_img read more

NASA Researchers, Doctors Treat First Known Blood Clot in Space

first_imgWhen astronauts suddenly experience a medical situation on the International Space Station 250 miles above Earth, the terms “emergency room” or “urgent care” take on a unique meaning.Late last year, NASA researchers suspected that one of their astronauts was suffering from a blood clot during a long duration stay on the space station.The clot was detected during a vascular study of 11 astronauts that was intended to assess the effect of space on the internal jugular vein. In zero gravity, astronauts’ blood and tissue fluid shifts toward the head.The study involved nine men and two women who were an average age of 46. Their identities were not included in the study.A new assessment of the blood clot was published last Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.Six of the participating astronauts experienced stagnant or reverse blood flow, another one had a blood clot, and yet another was considered to have a potential partial blood clot.Scientists weighed the risk of the blood clot, as well as its potential to block a vessel in the absence of gravity.Dr. Stephen Moll, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Medicine, was the only non-NASA physician who was consulted to help the affected astronaut.He says, “My first reaction when NASA reached out to me was to ask if I could visit the International Space Station to examine the patient myself. NASA told me they couldn’t get me up to space quickly enough, so I proceeded with the evaluation and treatment process from here in Chapel Hill.”Moll is a member of UNC’s Blood Research Center and is a blood clot expert.“Normally the protocol for treating a patient with deep vein thrombosis would be to start them on blood thinners for at least three months to prevent the clot from getting bigger and to lessen the harm it could cause if it moved to a different part of the body such as the lungs,” Moll adds. “There is some risk when taking blood thinners that if an injury occurs, it could cause internal bleeding that is difficult to stop. In either case, emergency medical attention could be needed. Knowing there are no emergency rooms in space, we had to weigh our options very carefully.”He spoke with the astronaut during a “phone call from space,” consulting with them as if the person were one of his other patients.The pharmacy aboard the space station contained 20 vials with 300 milligrams each of an injectable blood thinner. Moll directed the astronaut to use them on a daily basis until an anticoagulant drug could be sent to the station during a resupply mission.The astronaut took a higher dose of the injectable, called enoxaparin, for 33 days in order to control the risk of the blood clot. The dose was lowered after that time, as the astronaut awaited the arrival of the drug apixaban.The researchers watched the clot shrink over time. Blood flow was then induced after 47 days through the vein, although spontaneous blood flow was not achieved, even after undergoing treatment for 90 days.The blood clot disappeared 24 hours after landing. Six months later, the astronaut was still free of symptoms.According to Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor, study author, NASA astronaut and clinical associate professor of medicine at Louisiana State University’s Health New Orleans School of Medicine, “We still haven’t learned everything about Aerospace Medicine or Space Physiology.”She adds, “The biggest question that remains is how would we deal with this on an exploration class mission to Mars? How would we prepare ourselves medically? More research must be performed to further elucidate clot formation in this environment and possible countermeasures.”last_img read more

Sunday is the First Global Palindrome Date in Over 900 Years

first_imgSunday marks the first global palindrome date in 909 years.It is also the only palindrome date in all date formats that we will see in this century.Today is February 2, 2020, or 02/02/2020, which means the date as digits reads the same both front and backwards, regardless of the format in which a country writes the date.Both the MM/DD/YYYY format and the DD/MM/YYYY format read 02/02/2020 on this day, or simply 02022020.The last time a palindrome date in all formats occurred was 909 years ago, on 11/11/1111. It will happen again in 101 years, on 12/12/2121.last_img read more

Florida man accused of filming coworkers in day care bathroom

first_imgSt. Petersburg police say a cafeteria worker at Lew Williams Center for Early Learning is facing a video voyeurism charge.30-year-old Julin Nichols was arrested on Monday after co-workers say they found a cellphone taped under the sink and facing the toilet in a bathroom.Police didn’t say whether any children were involved in the investigation, or how many people were recorded by the phone.Officials are still investigating the case.last_img

Hawks shoot down Bombers 1-0 in Field Hockey Final

first_imgTo represent Nelson at the B.C. High School AA Girl’s Field Hockey Championships next month in North Vancouver, the L.V. Rogers Bombers need to play a few more games.J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks of Trail scored in the first minute en route to a 1-0 victory over the Bombers in the final of the West Kootenay Field Hockey Championships Wednesday at Pass Creek Park in Castlegar. The win was the first of the season for Crowe over LVR.The Bombers now take the back door route to provincials, competing in a Wild Card Game against #2 Okanagan and the #3 Fraser Valley Teams Tuesday (October 29), in Kelowna on the Mission Creek Turf  Fields.If the Bombers win the final, it’s off to the  AA Provincials in North Vancouver on November 6-8.Check out the Bombers athletics page at www.lvr.sd8.bc.calast_img read more