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New Winkworth team to advise on office and retail residential redevelopment

first_imgWinkworth has launched a business that plans to make hay from the demise of Britain’s high streets as development and commercial investment switches to creating homes within former offices and retail space.The company has hired Adam Stackhouse, who for the past seven years has worked at Bective Leslie Marsh heading up its Land and New Homes division in central London.Winkworth says his team will be looking at development and commercial opportunities created by shifts in the economic environment and the lack of footfall to high streets.But it also hopes to profit from the changes in planning legislation designed to speed up the delivery of new homes in former office and retail spaces following the extension of Permitted Development Rights.Initially the team will operate within Zones 1-6 in London followed by further expansion into commuter areas such as Guildford, Godalming, Woking, and Reading.Planning reforms“Planning reforms are creating a huge opportunity to regenerate the link roads leading to the high street, where there are boarded up shops which are no longer sustainable.,” says Stackhouse.“These buildings will be very attractive to investors for conversion into homes, revitalising the streetscape and bringing more residents into the area.“This will then create more demand for a more concentrated area of retail in the high street.“The demand for office buildings is also changing, as a result of Covid-19, where buildings may be suitable for residential or for reconfiguring into spaces for a new way of working, where people may not be in the office every day.”Read more about permitted development.adam stackhouse permitted development winkworth September 18, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » New Winkworth team to advise on office and retail residential redevelopment previous nextAgencies & PeopleNew Winkworth team to advise on office and retail residential redevelopmentAgency says changes in permitted development rules, Covid and online shopping mean retail and high street can only go one way.Nigel Lewis18th September 202001,261 Viewslast_img read more

Harvard Thinks Big

first_imgThe prospect of hearing 10 top Harvard instructors lecture for 10 minutes each on the subjects that they care most deeply about drew an overflow crowd to Sanders Theatre on Thursday (Feb. 11).Harvard Thinks Big, a student-organized discussion that paired leading lecturers with eager listeners, attracted these great minds to help explore and inspire new ways of thinking, in the first session of what organizers hope will become an annual experience.“It’s an effort to epitomize what’s best about Harvard and [remind people] why we came here in the first place: to hear incredible professors talking about the things that they know best, and to be inspired,” said senior Derek Flanzraich, who conceived of the event along with Peter Davis ’12.The format was based on the popular Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) talks, lectures given at the annual TED conference that follow the same tight format, and which have become online sensations.Before the series of 10-minute talks began, a line of students extended out to the Science Center, patiently hoping to get into the theater, undaunted by a long wait on a cold night.Gaining a lucky seat close to the front, sophomore Avinash Joshi was eager to listen to his Currier House master, Richard Wrangham, the Ruth Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences, as well as the other speakers.“I think the coolest idea is that they have to explain what they are most passionate about in 10 minutes … what they really care about, deep in their hearts. It’s going to come out tonight, and that’s why I am here.”Hundreds of students put their studies aside for the two-hour-plus discussion that touched on a range of topics, including violence, evolution, fairy tales, fire, religion, and hip-hop.Presentation styles ranged from subdued podium deliveries to ones infused with drama, such as the one by Andrew Berry, lecturer on organismic and evolutionary biology, who moved around the stage in a brief “drunken” stumble to help illustrate the confused arc of an important genetic mutation in human evolution.Lecturer on computer science David Malan ripped a phone book in two at one point, and worked up a sweat as he paced in front of the crowd, discussing the magic of making “machines do your bidding.” He encouraged students to explore fields that they might never have considered, the way he did as a Harvard undergraduate when he took a computer course outside his original government track.Diana Eck’s big idea was pluralism. Eck, professor of comparative religion and Indian studies and director of Harvard’s Pluralism Project, said she was there to recruit students to study religion, particularly pluralism, the broader engagement and understanding of other people’s faiths.“The ‘we’ in ‘we the people’ has become far more complex than ever before,” she said. “It will require stretching exercises. It will require all of us to know a lot more about each other.”For Daniel Gilbert, global warming isn’t happening fast enough to prompt a strong human response. The professor of psychology told the crowd that the reason the world is so slow to act on climate change is because the danger it poses isn’t intentional, immoral, imminent, or instantaneous. He outlined his theory on how the human brain responds to threats. If, in keeping with his “immoral” theory, “eating puppies” caused global warming, Gilbert said, people would be massing in the streets.Timothy McCarthy, lecturer on history and literature, adjunct lecturer on public policy, and director of the Human Rights and Social Movements Program at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, delivered an impassioned talk about the future of protest. He challenged students to embrace the protest spirit of people like Harvard graduate and Civil War Col. Robert Gould Shaw, the commander of the all-black 54th Regiment, who died and was buried with his men.McCarthy pointed to Gould’s statue in the hall and encouraged the students to “transform their privilege into passion.”“Brothers and sisters, if we are to have a future filled with freedom and hope and equality, rather than hatred and fear and exclusion, we must act now. Let us rededicate ourselves to [Abraham Lincoln’s] ‘better angels of our nature’ and bring about a new birth of protest.”The speakers were chosen largely by student request as part of a survey distributed to all undergraduates by the College Events Board in the fall. Harvard Undergraduate Television recorded the event and will post it on the studio’s Web site. Harvard’s Undergraduate Council also helped to plan the program.Davis and the president of the Undergraduate Council, Johnny Bowman ’11, hosted the evening, and Dean of Harvard College Evelynn M. Hammonds, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies, encouraged the students in the audience to explore their own big ideas.“All of us here want you to find your own passion.”One noticeable absence from the lineup was Michael Sandel, a popular speaker and the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Government. He was unable to attend because of a prior engagement. He is a speaker at this year’s TED conference in Long Beach, Calif.last_img read more

Was the BCB elections free, fair and transparent?

first_img(Letter to the Sports Editor)Please allow me space in your newspaper to respond to an article in the Guyana Chronicle Edition of 12th October, 2017, under the headline  “BCB President says Election was free, fair and transparent” written by Rajiv Bisnauth. It was simply unbelievable that someone who has spent over 30 years as an educator would allow his character to be stained with the most rigged election ever held in Guyana’s sporting arena  and then described it as free, fair and transparent. The Berbice Cricket Board Election on Sunday 8th October, 2017, would go down in history as the most rigged, untransparent and abuse of power to ever take place in the history of sports in Guyana.The “Selected” President pleaded for a chance for cricket to move forward and for Court cases to be shelved. One is left to wonder why he didn’t ask the same of his current Vice President and Treasurer who tied up the Anil Beharry Administration for two full years with a Court Injunction. Beharry won by a clear majority and yet was denied the opportunity to lead. The four votes by Rose Hall Town and Young Warriors would not have affected Beharry’s victory, but Somwaru didn’t have the courage to beg his now close friends to give Berbice Cricket a chance.The entire Berbice Cricketing public is very upset over the recent election which was clearly rigged and corrupted. The objective was not for the development of Berbice Cricket, but rather to protect at all costs the current leadership of the Guyana Cricket Board.For the sake of Berbice Cricket fans, can the Berbice Cricket Board President explain the following:a) Why was a Five Star Hotel chosen for the meeting? Was it because it was private property and access to the Election Hall could be prevented. b) Godwyn Allicock (is) one of the persons responsible for the Injunction against the Berbice Cricket Board for two years. Is it true that you authorised him to serve as a “bouncer” at the entrance of the elevator to the Hall and to turn away people who were not your supporters.The same Allicock later turned up as a delegate of Port Mourant, a candidate on your slate and later as your “selected” treasurer.c) Why was your rival for the Presidency denied access to the Election Hall? Is it true that was because he was not from a voting club? Can you explain to the public which club you were representing? d) Why was the two West Indies Cricket Directors, a former Guyana Cricket Board President, a University of Guyana Professor who has no linkage to cricket, allowed in the Hall.e) Why was Leslie Solomon and Raymond Mohamed allowed to pretend to be Mt. Sinai delegates when they have no connections to the Club. This resulted in the elected officials of the club being stopped from voting as mandated by the Club’s membership.f) Why was the Rose Hall Estate Community Centre mandated delegates refused permission to vote, based on a faked letterhead submitted by one of your closest advisors.The members of the Club had met and voted for their delegates and even decided who to support for the Presidency. Why then was the Club denied their voting rights? Is it because you knew that they were not supporting you.g) Why were Guymine, Mental Hospital and Kildonan stopped from voting when they had proper documents with their memberships? They could not have paid any membership fees to the Berbice Cricket Board because the High Court had ruled that your executives were illegal. The elections of the three clubs were widely published in the national media.h) Eighteen delegates allegedly signed a document supporting Dru Bahadur for the post of Returning Officer.Since only twelve delegates were supporting you, who were the other six.One Police delegate has already stated that he did not sign any letter to support Dru Bahadur but rather to indicate his presence at the meeting. Did the five other signatures included the fake delegates from Rose Hall Estate, Canje and Mt. Sinai.i) Do twelve out of 34 delegates form a quorum for an election?j) Why was nomination for the Presidency closed in less than five seconds? Why (was) the President of the Upper Corentyne Cricket Association prevented from nominating Hilbert Foster? Did you not trust your own 12 delegates?k) Who paid membership fees for Blairmont, Upper Corentyne, Chesney, Mt. Sinai and Police? Delegates at the meeting openly stated that no fees were paid. Even if it was paid by fake members, who received it on behalf of an illegal Cricket Board?Finally, Mr. Somwaru owes the cricketing public of Berbice an explanation on who paid for the rental of the Five Star Hotel, meals and the bar. The Berbice Cricket Board transported a whole Under-13 cricket team in a car, provide Kool Aid as refreshments for our youths, but somehow found funds for an International Hotel. You complained in the media that sponsorship was hard to obtain, but funds suddenly appeared to host the most rigged election.  The business sector should not support this illegal body who stole the voting rights of 20 delegates (8 clubs and the Upper Corentyne Cricket Association).Yours in Sports,Berbice Cricket Fanlast_img read more

USG resolution addresses custodian wages, health care

first_imgTwo outgoing Undergraduate Student Government officials presented a resolution Tuesday at the Senate meeting that aims to improve the compensation and benefits for custodians working at USC. USG President Debbie Lee proposed the budget for the 2018-19 academic year. Yuwei Xi | Daily TrojanThe USG Senate also voted unanimously in favor of approving the final USG hires for the 2018-19 academic year.Outgoing director of external affairs Mai Mizuno explained that the  custodian resolution aims to improve conditions for custodians at USC.“First, we want to reduce the out-of-pocket cost that they have to pay monthly for their health care from 7 percent to 6 percent,” she said. “Secondly, [we want] to have a comparable wage increase to the wages of other workers downtown.”Mizuno later explained that the resolution does not ask for a specific wage standard for custodians. It merely asks for wages comparable to those of other custodians working downtown who make $16.60 an hour, Mizuno said.Before presenting the details of the resolution, Mizuno read testimonials of two custodians who work at USC. She did not say their names. The first custodian testimonial came from a woman who has worked at USC for 11 years.“We would like to urge students to use their voices to stand up for us and ask the administration to pressure its subcontractor, Aramark, to address our grievances,” she wrote. “For some time now we have felt undervalued, belittled and treated like we weren’t important.”The second custodian testimonial came from a man who has worked at USC for 24 years.“We have seen many of our coworkers become disabled as a result of our workload,” he said. “What we would like to ask all of you is to ask the University to hold the company, Aramark, to be more conscious of the workload that has caused illness, stress and increased work pressure on my coworkers.”Mizuno also said that both the outgoing and incoming leadership of USG have supported for the resolution.Senator Michaela Murphy delivered a message of solidarity with the entire community, explaining why she is sponsoring the resolution.“I wish it went without saying that when we, as members of this community here at USC, say that we support fellow Trojans, we mean all Trojans here at USC,” she said. “But time and time again, we have seen that is not been the case, specifically with the treatment of the custodial staff here at USC.”Incoming USG President Debbie Lee also presented a comprehensive USG budget proposal for the 2018-19 academic year. The total budget is roughly $2.07 million.Part of the proposed budget is a subscription to The New York Times which would cost $8,000 and would provide 100 print copies to be distributed across campus on a daily basis. Some senators, however, raised concerns about how funding such an initiative would reduce the amount of funding that could be distributed to existing organizations that may need more funding.The USG Senate will vote on the custodian resolution and the 2018-19 USG budget in next week’s Senate meeting.last_img read more

Racism of Darwin and His Followers Exposed

first_imgA new documentary from the Discovery Institute exposes what evolutionists are trying to cover up: “scientific racism” by Darwinians.The documentary “Human Zoos,” written and directed by Dr John West of the Discovery Institute, is now available on Amazon Prime for viewing. See the trailer here.In his new book Evolution’s Blunders Frauds and Forgeries, Jerry Bergman debunks the fraudulent belief that facial angle was an indicator of intelligence.The film speaks for itself, but perhaps the most important message is how practically the entire scientific establishment, including leading anthropologists from Harvard, Yale, Princeton, the University of Ohio, the Smithsonian were behind “scientific racism.” They  supported not only eugenics, but also rationalized the public display of non-white humans in zoos. The story of Ota Benga, an African pygmy, is given prominent coverage.Displays of human “missing links” were not only PT-Barnum-style stunts, but serious attempts by leading scientists to help the public “understand” human evolution. Now, these same institutions, including the Bronx Zoo and the American Museum of Natural History, are trying to whitewash what happened there. They refused to be interviewed for this film or even answer questions, and no indication of their misdeeds can be found in their public facade. A traveling display about Darwin from the museum, in fact, mentions nothing about scientific racism, except to call “social Darwinism” a corruption of Darwin’s ideas. And yet almost all the leading evolutionary scientists of the day in the early 1900’s were guilty of advancing eugenics and racism.To show how important this issue remains, the film gives examples of school boards refusing to allow curricula to even mention the dark side of Darwinism, including scientific racism and eugenics. They want a sanitized Darwin with a halo, so that evolution gets the distinction of being the only scientific view recognized by today’s “consensus.”The film shows how Christians were the primary ones denouncing these atrocities, arguing that all men are created equal and made in the image of God.Watch Human Zoos now, and get others to watch it. Maybe the Darwinian history of racism will be its undoing. If this history is forgotten, the evil root of Darwinism, which ranks people by their “fitness” to society, will rear its ugly head in other, more pernicious ways. Some would argue that it already has (see October 9 entry).Darwinians had a long history of ‘scientific racism’ and white supremacy.For more on Ota Benga and the racism of the 20th century Darwinists, read Jerry Bergman’s alarmingi book, The Darwin Effect. (Visited 913 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more