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ND ranked as top-producing institution for Fulbright grants

first_imgMary McGraw Jeffrey Thibert, assistant director of national fellowships in Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), said placement on the list is a significant honor for the University, raising its profile even further among U.S. doctoral and research institutions.“The grants benefit Notre Dame by confirming the University’s commitment to internationalization and expanding our global reputation,” he said. “Notre Dame Fulbright recipients are not just representing the U.S. abroad; they are representing Notre Dame abroad as well.”Thibert said the Fulbright is a great opportunity for students for three key reasons, the first of which is its ability to allow students to deepen their engagements with a particular part of the world through an immersive academic and cultural experience.“Second, the Fulbright provides funding for work that can significantly enhance one’s professional trajectory, whether that work is graduate study, dissertation research or classroom teaching experience,” he said. “Third, receiving a Fulbright grant opens the door to a vast network of Fulbright recipients around the world, and the prestige associated with the Fulbright has been a marker of outstanding achievement for decades.”Strong applicants often have experiences in their academic or extracurricular histories that indicate an interest in the wider world and the ability to adapt to an unfamiliar cultural environment, Thibert said. These experiences may involve study or research abroad as well as participation in internationally-themed coursework or clubs.“Notre Dame students are competitive applicants for the Fulbright because the University has prioritized international engagement for undergraduates and graduate/professional students,” he said. “…Because the Fulbright U.S. Student Program is fundamentally about promoting cultural exchange through educational exchange, international engagement as a student is a key indicator that someone will be an effective representative of the U.S. abroad.”Class of 2014 alumna Deanna Kolberg, who received a Fulbright grant for the 2014-15 program, is currently working as a teaching assistant in South Korea.Hoping to one day pursue a policy job within the U.S. government, Kolberg said she sees herself contributing to foreign policy through research or ground work with the Department of State.“Korea is of huge importance for U.S. national security policy, with large numbers of military personnel protecting the border from a hostile state to the North, and lies as a hub for U.S. security in greater Asia,” she said. “I can’t think of a job in foreign policy over the next 50 years that won’t need knowledge of Korea.”Kolberg said anyone looking to apply for a Fulbright grant should take full advantage of the opportunities Notre Dame has to offer.“Don’t spend your fall break at home — apply for a Nanovic Grant,” she said. “Do research beyond what’s required of your classes. Write a senior thesis. Keep in touch with your professors.”Kolberg said she has benefited in a variety of ways as a result of joining the Fulbright community.“You’re in a group of really highly motivated internationally-minded thinkers, with plenty of opportunity to interact,” she said. “I’ve learned a whole new set of skills and patience living with a Korean host family in pretty much the middle of nowhere.”As a teacher in Korea, Kolberg said she has experienced both the joys and pains of teaching and her own Korean has slowly improved as well.“More than anything, I’m one of the few people I graduated with who can honestly say they love their job,” she said.Even when her mood wasn’t the best, Kolberg said she was uplifted when greeted by students in the hallway shouting, “We love you, Deanna!”“And you just can’t have a bad day like that,” she said. “They just won’t let you.”After her school’s graduation day last week, Kolberg said countless students told her how much they appreciated her class and how much they learned. Her next career move is now centered on returning to the United States.“I recently was accepted to the Ph.D. in political science program at the University of Michigan, which I can only think had something to do with my participation in the Fulbright program,” she said.Class of 2014 alumnus Marcus Liddell, another 2014-15 Fulbright recipient, also received an English teaching assistantship, although he currently resides in Germany, working at a secondary school teaching grades 7-12.Liddell said he decided to apply for the Fulbright grant due to his interest in education and his pursuit of a degree in German and minor in education, schooling and society.“My summer jobs had been education-related,” he said. “I had studied abroad in Germany for a semester, and I had spent a week while I was there shadowing teachers at a local high school, so I had some evidence that this was the kind of thing I’d like to be doing with or without a fellowship.”After returning from study abroad in Berlin, Liddell said he was almost fluent in German.“I felt like I needed more time in Germany to really become comfortable speaking the language, and that was something that was really important to me,” he said.Beyond that, Liddell said he already knew a little bit about education in Germany and was interested in getting a closer, first-hand look at how the system worked.“It was an easy choice from both the standpoint of improving my German and the standpoint of getting some practical experience as an educator,” he said.With about 12 to 14 lessons a week, Liddell said, for the most part, he does all the teaching. He said he spends his time outside of the classroom traveling, working in the community with sports and other activities and pursuing a research project.“I’ve started [to] run a couple after-school clubs and helped out with a number of shorter-term projects,” he said. “… When the weather gets a little nicer here, I’d like to start a small touch rugby league at my school.”Liddell said students interested in a Fulbright should consider the application process early and work with an advisor.“Decide if the things you want to do fit with what the Fulbright is offering,” he said. “If you’re a good fit in your mind, if you’re not just curious, but truly passionate, then you should consider applying.”Applications for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program are assisted in a joint effort between the CUSE and the Graduate School, Thibert said. Undergraduates interested in learning more should visit CUSE National Fellowships online at http://fellows.nd.edu, and graduate/professional students and alumni should contact Dr. Mike Westrate at [email protected]“As we send more Fulbright recipients around the world, they raise the University’s global profile, which will help us to continue to bring the best international students to the University while fostering productive international academic collaborations,” Thibert said.Tags: Fulbright, fulbright grants, fulbright scholar awards, Fulbright Scholars, Fulbright U.S. Student Program, Jeffrey T Ten students from Notre Dame were awarded Fulbright grants for the 2014-15 program, ranking the University as a top-producing institution of grant recipients.last_img read more

From the Editors: This section isn’t your escape

first_imgWe’re in the middle of a monthslong pandemic that is now hitting Southern California hard. If not done strategically and with health at the absolute forefront of decision making, playing any sport this fall will put not just the health of student-athletes, coaches and team personnel at risk but also that of the surrounding South Central community. Universities across the country are not incubated from the neighborhoods that surround them, meaning every NCAA-affiliated event carried out carelessly could endanger residents whether they are fans or not.   At the same time, it is evident that this brand is part of a flawed system reflecting the plague of systemic racism so deeply ingrained in our society. The student-athletes that make college sports function are using their platforms to say as much — and we should listen. The NCAA has long been known as an organization that exploits its student-athletes by reeling in hundreds of millions of dollars for predominantly white administrators, commissioners, athletic directors and coaches without directing a dime of that money toward the student-athletes generating its revenue. This dynamic is especially prevalent in college football and basketball — sports that make the most money and comprise the highest percentage of Black student-athletes. The Black Lives Matter movement has firmly ingrained itself in athletics, and that cannot and should not be undone. The work begun by Colin Kaepernick and carried on by Eric Reid, LeBron James and countless others has made a profound impact on sports, and athletes on both the professional and collegiate stage are continuing that today.   Note: This article was written prior to the postponement of Pac-12 sports through 2020. It’s our responsibility to tell these stories. It’s our responsibility to highlight and celebrate the achievements of Black student-athletes, both on and off the field, that are too often taken for granted. It’s our responsibility as journalists at USC to shed light on how college sports are not a vacuum outside of society but rather part of an inherently unequal hierarchical system. We know that USC Athletics is a major aspect of campus life for students, identity for alumni and pride for fans. USC Athletics is a brand, one that plays a central role to so many members of the University community. The term “Trojan Family” is perhaps best on display amid the backdrop of USC sports, and that’s a reality we don’t take lightly. The Daily Trojan is a completely independent, student-run platform, and it is our job to provide a voice to our local community and student body. This means increasing profiles that highlight the achievements and contributions on and off the field of the Black student-athletes in our community, dedicating ourselves to covering social justice issues within USC Athletics and the wider world of sports and holding the Athletic Department accountable to follow through with its initiatives to fight for racial justice both within Trojan athletics and beyond. We want to look at the big picture when reporting on our student-athletes. All of us love sports, but that doesn’t mean the system providing us with such rich and entertaining moments is or has ever been anything close to perfect. The student-athletes who make you proud to call yourself a Trojan are reckoning with a sporting landscape that doesn’t prioritize their equity.  Tradition is everything to USC, but change is demanded for a reason. These are just some of the many ways we can and must listen to the voices — especially those of color — in our community and help do our part in effecting lasting, tangible change.  College athletes have said as much. A group of Pac-12 football players wrote a letter in the Players’ Tribune Aug. 2 stating they will opt out of the 2020 season if the NCAA does not remedy these shortcomings. Student-athletes at USC formed the United Black Student-Athletes Association in June to demand that the Athletic Department better support its Black student-athletes and actively fight racial injustice. center_img Statues of USC’s 1969 defensive line, known as “The Wild Bunch,” cast a shadow outside of Heritage Hall. (Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) There is a multitude of questions regarding whether fall sports will be played this year. Administrators are forced to consider not just the economic necessity and logistical feasibility of safely carrying out a 2020 season but also the ethics of taking such a risk in the first place.  Tailgating? Wouldn’t bet on it. Fans in the stadiums? Unlikely. Games taking place at all? Far too early to tell, but there’s no guarantee — no matter what the schedule says.  This is a moment when we must collectively understand that acknowledging systemic injustice without actively working to dismantle it is simply not enough. So, until we’re all told there won’t be college sports this semester, the Daily Trojan sports team will continue to bring you as close to your typical fan experience as we can with the resources available to us, even if much of that work will be done remotely. Now, to add on, student-athletes are having to fight for uniform coronavirus prevention protocols and medical coverage from the NCAA during a pandemic that disproportionately affects the Black community. This is our promise to reflect these complex truths in our reporting. This is our promise to improve upon our regrettable lack of diversity among our staff and our columnists to uplift the voices that we have historically undercovered. In just about every way, this won’t be a normal semester for anyone in the USC community. Athletics are no exception, and that’s not just because the football schedule will exclude Notre Dame for the first time since World War II. Most people across the sporting landscape have concerns about the feasibility of safely carrying out a fall sports season. Almost all are hoping there’s a way to make it happen. Both statements apply to us. last_img read more

Lakers’ D’Angelo Russell will try to overcome slow start

first_imgThe images looked comical as the 7-foot-1 Timofey Mozogv has taken 3-pointers at the end of recent practices. But with Lakers coach Luke Walton hoping to incorporate Golden State’s philosophies on the increased use of the 3-point shot, why not?“I need to work on everything,” Mozgov said. “You have to improve your game. Maybe one day they’ll let you shoot.”Apparently, that day has already happened. Mozgov insisted Lakers assistant coach Brian Shaw has “a special play for me.” Laughter quickly erupted.“It’s no joke,” Mozgov said. “I’m serious.”So will he take a 3-pointer in a game?“If I’m going to be on the court with the ball, of course I’m going to shoot,” Mozgov said. “I have to. It’s not like I’ll run to the 3-point line and shoot. We have a lot of shooters. We have a lot of work to do. We’re not just shooting 3s.” EL SEGUNDO >> This could have marked the time where D’Angelo Russell would put on a show perhaps as captivating as his summer league play. Maybe he would make another game-winning 3-pointer. Maybe he would throw out enough nifty passes to fill a highlight reel. Maybe he would carry those positive vibes he has felt for Lakers coach Luke Walton and show how that will lift his game.Instead, Russell opened exhibition play against Sacramento on Tuesday collecting nearly as many fouls (three) as points (four) and logging more turnovers (five) than assists (three). The Lakers only beat the Kings, 103-84 because the reserves chipped away at a 13-point half-time deficit.“It was average,” Russell said of his play. “I didn’t have that pace and pep in my step. But it’s all new.”So with the Lakers (1-0) continuing their exhibition schedule against the Denver Nuggets (1-0) on Friday at Staples Center, Russell vowed for a much better encore. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img “It only gets better. The only way we can go is forward,” Russell said. “With the new coaching staff and offense, everything is still new. No matter how times we’ve gone over it, going against different defenders, teams and reads, it’s all new.”Everything seemed even more new to rookie forward Brandon Ingram, whose two points and 0-of-5 clip overshadowed his two rebounds, two blocks and one steal.After experiencing mixed performances and evolving roles his rookie season last year, Russell predicted Ingram’s hiccups will not last long.“It only gets easier,” Russell said. “The more he starts to trust the system and relaxes, I feel like it’ll be easier. He’s going to realize where he can get his shots and what he can get away with this in this league.”Expanding his boundarieslast_img read more