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Degree course for Irish National Bakery School

first_imgThe Irish National Bakery School is finalising details of a new degree course for the next academic year, writes Ann Marie Foley. It is also advertising short bakery courses for chefs in Ireland’s top catering magazine. This follows the popularity of last year’s short courses among people from small catering and café businesses. “This year we decided to target hotels, on the basis that many are now using frozen bought-in product. I believe it is often the same and not of top quality,” said Derek O’Brien, head of the National Bakery School. He explained chefs tend not to tackle bread-making but that the three-day course can be tailored to their needs. “In America, they offer what they call signature bread, which is specific to a restaurant or hotel. Avoca in Bray makes its own bread and you cannot get it anywhere else. So that is what we are suggesting.” The school’s full-time two year Higher Certificate course will be extended by a year to become a degree course. However, students who want to leave after the two years will still receive the Higher Certificate. The degree course is aimed at technicians and technologists and those entering the bakery industry but also the wider food industry, such as delis and cafés that offer their own bread andbakery products. The school also offers four part-time courses that are continually full: Professional Baking – Bread; Cake; Fruit Bread; and Pastry. These and other short courses receive Continuing Professional Development (CPD) qualifications under the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) of which the Bakery School is part. While the school once catered for all bakery training in Ireland, enterprise-led support body Skillnets now offers workplace courses. The DIT and all its schools such as the bakery are to move to a new Dublin location during the next few years.last_img read more

Grenada’s Kirani James ‘recovering nicely’ – agent

first_img2012 Olympic 400-metre champion Kirani James is said to be recovering well from an illness that had sidelined him since April.The 24-year-old Grenadian, who was second to Wayde van Niekerk in the 400m at the Olympic Game in Rio last summer, had been sidelined since April with what is believed to be respiratory illness that saw him finish a disappointing sixth at the Drake Relays in April in a pedestrian 46.21s.His coach Harvey Glance told Sportsmax.tv following that underwhelming performance, that James’ season was being ‘put on hold’.“Anyone who has followed his illustrious career can tell he is not 100 per cent,” Glance said then in response to SportsMax.tv’s queries. “His season is on hold for now till we get him back to that point.”However, based on information recently received from James’ handlers, the athlete is back in training. “At this time we are pleased to report that he is recovering nicely from his illness,” said Seth Katz of AMG Property Sports Incorporated in an email responding to SportsMax.tv’s request for an update. He offered no additional information.James has had a relatively ordinary start to the 2017 season. At the Grenada Invitational on April 8, James was less than convincing while winning the 400 metres in 45.44s but was upstaged by Bahamian Steve Gardiner, who won the ‘B’ race in a world-leading 44.26.In Iowa he was even slower and was sidelined in an effort to get him back to full fitness. (Sportsmax)last_img read more