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Studying connection between Alzheimer’s Disease and coronavirus

first_img Pinterest CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Google+ By Network Indiana – June 10, 2020 2 726 Facebook Google+ Studying connection between Alzheimer’s Disease and coronavirus (Photo supplied/Centers For Disease Control and Prevention) BLOOMINGTON, Ind.–The connection between Alzheimer’s Disease and coronavirus is apparent, but not yet understood said a doctor who is helping lead a study to find a cure for Alzheimer’s. Indiana University is one of the testing sites for that study.“This is a dosease, which we see from COVID, how vulnerable people with Alzheimer’s Disease are to communicable diseases,” said Dr. Jeffrey L. Cummings, Research Professor, Department of Brain Health at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas.“For reasons that are still to be determined we see that almost a third of all the deaths from COVID are nursing home residents and most of those residents have Alzheimer’s Disease,” he said. “So, there is some vulnerable link between Alzheimer’s Disease and COVID that we have yet to fully understand. But, what we see is the tremendous vulnerability that Alzheimer’s Disease has when it comes to COVID.”He said that’s why it’s more important now to find a cure. So, Cummings is inviting people to participate in the Alzheimer’s Prevention Trials Webstudy.“They take some memory tests and it’s kind of fun. It’s like card sorting tests, and they rate their own memory. We do that every three months for the rest of their lives.”The intent is to detect when there’s a slight change in a person’s memory. Cummings said having tens of thousands of people participate will give them a lot of information and will also help people who are in the early stages.“By being able to detect people who are in the earliest stages we can refer them to local universities that serve as clinical trial sites and they’re told about clinical trials,” said Cummings. He said the goal at that stage is to find medicines within the trials that could slow the disease down or cure it.IU is one of the sites.“They have a very active research group there. They’re part of the national infrastructure of Alzheimer’s Disease clinical trial sites,” he said. “They are fantastic leaders in many aspects of Alzheimer’s Disease research.”If you’d like to sign up to participate, you must be a healthy adult over 50. You can sign up at www.aptwebstudy.org. WhatsApp Previous articleMichigan releases statewide Wi-Fi hotspot map, includes 300+ locationsNext articleChild abuse reports down in Indiana since pandemic stay-at-home order Network Indianalast_img read more

From Ed Portal to Harvard Yard

first_imgWhen incoming freshman Kevin Yang learned he was accepted to Harvard College, he quickly wrote and thanked one of the people who helped him the most — Tri Huynh. As a Harvard student, Huynh, now a teacher in California, tutored Yang once a week at Harvard’s Education Portal in Allston.Opened in 2008, Harvard’s Ed Portal serves as a cooperation agreement between Harvard and the city of Boston to bring the University’s greatest strengths of teaching and research to the Allston-Brighton community.For Yang, who moved many times during his middle and high school years, the Ed Portal was a constant. “We’ve lived all over Massachusetts, and moving so often was difficult,” Yang said. “High school was very stressful, and writing my college essay helped me reflect on my identity.”While Yang’s parents worked — his mother is a nurse and his father a scientist — Yang’s grandparents drove him back and forth from the Ed Portal several times each week. These days they drive his younger brother Neil there for his mentoring sessions.Noting his parents high regard for education, Yang said: “You’re always stepping on the backs of your parents to go further. Getting into Harvard is a new experience for all of us — it has been a roller coaster ride. At the end of the day, they are proud of me.” 1Incoming freshman, Kevin Yang, foreground, and his family, at their home. From left, Yi Jin, Kevin’s mother; grandfather, Yongshou Jin; brother, Neil Jin and grandmother, Yi Qun Zhu. His dad, Hailin Yang, not pictured, was at work. 5Neil takes Kevin’s longboard for a ride in their neighborhood. 15In Harvard Yard, Kevin checks his new Harvard ID, comparing it to the one from Boston Latin, and noting how much he has changed. 7For several years, Kevin’s grandparents drove him to and from the Ed Portal, school, and other activities. Currently, Kevin is in the driver’s seat with his learner’s permit while his grandfather instructs him from the passenger seat. 12Neil plays a computer game, while Kevin looks on. Remembering his own mentor, Kevin says, “He was more than a tutor — he was a real person, he helped me to chill. He recognized my human side … he also saw my interest in biology and helped me with my studies.” 2A shelf in the living room displays Kevin’s many awards and some family photos. 8Kevin attended Boston Latin School, the oldest school in America, founded in 1635. 4Kevin’s younger brother, Neil, looks up to him. 6Kevin’s grandfather, Yongshou Jin, speaks Shanghainese. Kevin speaks English, Latin, Chinese, Spanish, and Shanghainese. 9Five signers of the Declaration of Independence along with many other notable historic figures attended BLS. 10Kevin graduated in June. 3Kevin reads his acceptance letter to Harvard. 13On freshmen move-in day, Kevin, returning from his Freshman Orientation Program (FOP), greets Catherine Zhang ’19, on left, while his mother, Yi Jin and father Hailin, look on. Yi Jin rejoiced when she saw her son following his FOP of hiking and camping in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. 14Kevin greets his new roommate, T.J. Song (right) of Gilroy, Calif. They’ll share a room, part of a suite in Weld Hall. 11Kevin and Neil pose inside the Harvard EdPortal. When Kevin attended, the Ed Portal was across the street from its current location at 224 Western Ave. in Allston. Membership is free and hundreds of students like Yang take advantage of the Allston-Brighton mentoring program, which pairs a Harvard student with a local youth. 16Kevin hugs his mother. His father, Hailin, said he would miss work to be at move-in day partly so he could, “park the car in Harvard Yard.” The family car is to the left.last_img read more

Oslo to Transfer to Broadway

first_img The acclaimed off-Broadway production of J.T. Rogers’ Oslo, headlined by Tony winners Jennifer Ehle and Jefferson Mays, will transfer to the Main Stem next spring. Helmed by Tony winner Bartlett Sher, the show, which is currently playing at Lincoln Center Theater’s Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, will move to LCT’s larger (and thus Broadway eligible) venue, the Vivian Beaumont Theater, beginning previews on March 23, 2017. Opening night is set for April 13.The Vivian Beaumont Theater incarnation of Oslo will feature the production’s original cast. Along with Ehle and Mays, the company includes Michael Aronov, Anthony Azizi, Adam Dannheisser, Daniel Jenkins, Dariush Kashani, Jeb Kreager, Jefferson Mays, Christopher McHale, Daniel Oreskes, Angela Pierce, Henny Russell, Joseph Siravo and T. Ryder Smith.A darkly comic epic, Oslo tells the true but until now untold story of how one young couple, Norwegian diplomat Mona Juul (Ehle) and her husband social scientist Terje Rød-Larsen (Mays), planned and orchestrated top-secret, high-level meetings between the State of Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization, which culminated in the signing of the historic 1993 Oslo Accords. Featuring dozens of characters and set in locations across the globe, Oslo is both a political thriller and the personal story of a small band of women and men struggling together—and fighting each other—as they seek to change the world.The production will once again have sets by Michael Yeargan, costumes by Catherine Zuber, lighting by Donald Holder and sound by Peter John Still.Oslo will run off-Broadway through August 28. Jennifer Ehle & Jefferson Mays in ‘Oslo'(Photo: T. Charles Erickson) Related Shows Star Files Jefferson Mayscenter_img Oslo Show Closed This production ended its run on July 16, 2017 View Commentslast_img read more

Chile Emphasizes the Importance of Women in Peacekeeping Missions

first_imgBy Guillermo Saavedra/Diálogo January 29, 2019 Through the Joint Peacekeeping Operations Center (CECOPAC, in Spanish), the Chilean Joint Chiefs of Staff concluded 2018 with a course addressing the role of women in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping missions. The international course Women, Peace, and Security: Gender Integration in Peacekeeping Operations was conducted December 3-7, at CECOPAC in Santiago, Chile. Forty-five units from security and armed forces of the region, including representatives of Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, El Salvador, the United States, and Uruguay, took part in the course. Participants learned about gender issues, cultural diversity, human rights, and negotiation, among other topics. The objective of the activity was to share basic and fundamental knowledge on gender perspectives in peacekeeping missions to provide the proper tools and skills to the personnel deployed in these operations. The course also emphasized the role of peacekeeping personnel as protectors of the most vulnerable members of the population—women and children. “In the last two years, this has been a particularly relevant issue for us,” Chilean Navy Captain Marco Villegas Zanón, CECOPAC director, told Diálogo. “Basically, the course’s purpose and focus is to prepare monitors in these fields.” Troop requirement The course was conducted as part of the Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI), a program of the U.S. Department of State that seeks to reinforce partner nations’ capabilities in the execution of peacekeeping operations. CECOPAC conducted the third edition of the course with the support of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) through the Security Cooperation Office at the U.S. Embassy in Chile. “U.S. involvement is present in all areas,” said Capt. Villegas. “Professors come from the United States; they’re involved in the coordination of activities and program design, logistics, and the possibility of bringing foreign students to the country.” The course is the result of a partnership among GPOI, SOUTHCOM, the U.S. Navy’s Naval Postgraduate School, and CECOPAC that dates back to 2013. The activity also supports UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security, and is a requirement for troops that deploy in peacekeeping operations. “[Resolution 1325] extends the traditional concept of security to include more citizens, especially women and people who weren’t traditionally considered part of the security structure that a country was supposed to provide,” said Guillermo Holzmann, a Chilean defense and international affairs analyst. “It suggests who should provide those conditions, and who should be the participants, and this is where it advises on the inclusion of women […], in humanitarian situations requiring security conditions that will be much more efficient and effective when the gender perspective is addressed.” Better prepared The course was taught in a conference format, with several modules distributed over the course of five days. Activities included lectures on concepts of organizational change, stress management, and intercultural communication, among others. “The course addresses a full range of risks, from marginalization of women to sexual and gender-based violence,” Alex Concepción, GPOI assistant program manager at SOUTHCOM, told Diálogo. “We take the perspective that peacekeepers who understand the risks to women develop intervention skills and apply those skills to realistic scenarios. They are better prepared to act morally and effectively when they encounter a genuine threat in a conflict situation.” According to Concepción, CECOPAC played an important role throughout the initiative and demonstrated its regional leadership in preparing security and armed forces on women’s empowerment issues. He added that Chile showed great interest in helping regional countries to deploy in peacekeeping missions. “At a regional level, Chile is very progressive in these areas,” Concepción said. “Chile was the first country in Latin America to create and develop a National Action Plan for Women, Security, and Peace, which has inspired other countries in the region, [such as] El Salvador and Paraguay, to work on their own plan.” “I would like to emphasize the opportunity that the GPOI initiative gives us to teach these topics to national and foreign personnel,” Capt. Villegas concluded. “Also, [I want to emphasize] the fact that we can contribute to training people throughout Latin America.” The course was first taught in Uruguay, in 2015. It was carried out twice more in 2018, in Peru in May and in Chile in December. CECOPAC plans to conduct the same course in El Salvador in 2019.last_img read more