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Studying art by making it

first_imgHistorically, Harvard has valued the head over the hand, but that may soon shift — at least in one discipline.Under the auspices of Jennifer L. Roberts, the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, and Ethan Lasser, Theodore E. Stebbins Jr. Curator of American art at the Harvard Art Museums, graduate students, particularly those in art history, are joining a University movement against what Roberts calls a “longstanding, multi-century bias toward conceptual and mathematical, verbal, abstract forms of knowledge over the forms of knowledge embedded in making.”As their class “Minding Making: Art History and Artisanal Intelligence” goes through its second iteration, students are learning how hands-on experience with materials and processes feeds a different kind of awareness and a new appreciation of the finished product.Part of a larger project, detailed at mindingmaking.org, the class follows several summer graduate workshops, as well as a broader trend toward recognizing art-making as part of the University’s “cognitive life,” said Roberts. “The humanities are in the middle of what’s known as the material turn,” she explained. “There’s a lot of interest in matter and materiality, but that hasn’t really yet translated into a clear new way of thinking about making, about interacting with all that material.”,“Maker is a generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship.” — Professor Jennifer Roberts, pictured below with Ethan Lasser,This course seeks to address this tactical way of thinking, with readings on the intellectual history of crafts, as well as visits to artists, artisans, and their workplaces, including an aluminum casting factory.“Maker,” Roberts explained, is a “generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship. Art historians tend not to go to factories. They’re not interested in mass production. There are a lot of assumptions about what someone does.”“Art history,” added Lasser, “is constructed around a finished object, and the power of this approach is in going back through it and understanding what it takes to get to that object.”In Roberts’ words, the practitioners seek to “get outside the library and books for sources of knowledge.” Lasser elaborated, explaining that the goal of the course is to provide “a sense of the feel, the tactile knowledge, of how much physical labor goes into something.”“At every stage,” he said, “there’s some information that art historians don’t generally write about because they don’t know about, because they’re just looking at the finished object.”,On a stormy Friday, students were involved in another element of the course, trying their hands at etching: from the first preparation of the plates through printing. The work is laborious, and students such as Destiny Crowley of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences were spending considerable time applying the thick black ink and then wiping it nearly off before attempting to print a first proof.Speaking while she worked, Crowley, a first-year student in the history of art and architecture Ph.D. program, explained that she signed on to address “a gaping lack in my education when it came to the actual creation of art.” As she wiped the viscous ink over her plate, she noted how that also gave her additional insight into works she has long admired: the Blank Signs series of prints by artist Ed Ruscha, who hails from her home state of Oklahoma.“The aquatint gives the print a very light shade of coloring,” Crowley explained, describing Ruscha’s series. “And the signs themselves are left stark white.” Noting “the juxtaposition of moving from darkness to light, the pitch black of the ink, the deep blackish brown of the asphaltum ground that we had to apply to the plate,” she said, “I find it very interesting that the print ended up being such a bold interplay of lightness.”Working with the coal-black ink, she shared her insight. “It is really amazing how you can go from a really onyx black — almost a void on this space — and strip that away,” she said. “There’s a reason why artists choose the artistic processes they do, an etching versus an oil painting.”,“There are so many different reasons for choosing a material,” agreed Iain Gordon, who is pursuing a master’s in design studies. Unlike several of his classmates, Gordon, who was drying a treated plate, has been involved on the “making” side, building furniture as well as other projects for several years. “For me, this is a way to engage with the making in a theoretical and critical way,” he said.“I knew it would be time-consuming and unpredictable and a different kind of mental and physical energy,” said Rachel Vogel, who is in her second year of the Ph.D. program in the history of art and architecture. “But you don’t realize the extent of all of those things until you really start doing it.“Learning those kinds of chains of causality and being able to recognize how a particular choice an artist made might be a response to something else that’s happening in the print …” She paused as she continued to wipe ink off her etching plate. “To begin to unpack the layers that must have happened in order for the artist to have constructed a plate is something that really can only happen once you’ve had the experience of making prints yourself.”last_img read more

Cloud Peak coal production down sharply in second quarter

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Data reported to federal officials suggests Cloud Peak Energy Inc. could post a weak second quarter in the face of ongoing domestic coal pricing pressures.Cloud Peak’s three coal mines reported 11.6 million tons of coal production in the second quarter, down 3.7% from 12.1 million tons in the prior quarter and falling 17.8% from the 14.1 million tons of coal produced in the second quarter of 2017, according to data reported to the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration. It was the lowest production quarter for the company since its IPO in 2009, Seaport Global Securities LLC analyst Mark Levin wrote in a July 16 note.“While [the second quarter] is typically a weak quarter for all [Powder River Basin] producers, we think [Cloud Peak’s] production, even by those standards, is a disappointment,” Levin wrote. “We suspect low natural gas prices, coal plant retirements, and increased use of renewables continue to weigh on demand.”Levin added that while export markets are a bright spot, that does not offset underlying concerns about domestic demand for Powder River Basin coal. He reiterated a neutral rating on the company.MSHA data shows quarter-over-quarter production increased by more than a half a million tons at Cloud Peak’s Spring Creek mine, which is where the company generally sources the coal it sells into export markets. However, the company’s domestic utility-focused Antelope and Cordero Rojo mines both significantly lowered coal production compared to the same quarter a year ago.More ($): Coal production from Cloud Peak Energy mines down sharply in recent quarter Cloud Peak coal production down sharply in second quarterlast_img read more

Clips of the Week: May 2, 2013

first_imgOur favorite web videos from the week that was:1. Tuckerman’s RevengeThings can get pretty rowdy at Vermont’s Tuckerman Ravine during the spring rut. This year was no exception, and here’s 30 seconds of it.30 Seconds of Tuckerman from Granite Films Jim Surette on Vimeo.2. Shutter’s Thru-HikeWe have been running dispatches from Chris Gallaway’s A.T. thru-hike, but here is a funny little video from last year’s hiking season.3. Basic Outdoors Epic-nessThe 2013 demo reel from Reel Water Productions. These guys know what they are doing.2013 Reel Water Productions Demo Reel from Reel Water Productions on Vimeo.That’s all for this week. If you have a video you would like to share for Clips of the Week, leave a comment or email [email protected] a great weekend!last_img read more

234 BIN Officers Receive Letters of Employment

first_imgThe bureau of immigration and naturalization (BIN) yesterday begins a distribution of letters of employment, identification card and a feet wear to 234 graduate officers in Monrovia. Turning over of the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization (BIN) class one to the administration, Colonel Adolphus B. saywah (BIN) chief training officer said “training is the eyes opener” of the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization service by which officers abide by. Mr. Adolphus B. saywah said, 250 men and women was part of the training but added that 16 failed to meet up with the training cateria prescribes by (BIN). He has thanked the heads of BIN and the government of Liberia for their continued support from august of this year.Mr. saywah describes this class as one of the most success graduating officers of the (BIN) due to what he term as full support from the national government and other arm of the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization he added.He added that this was the first time for the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization to recruits this numbers of men and women to serve their country (Liberia).Acting commissioner for (BIN) Cllr. Lemuel E. A. Reeves  urged the newly employed BIN officers to  work according to the law that guards the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization.“Mainly the laws of alien and naturalization,inorder to gui the law that govern the BIN  will be distributed to every officers of this graduating class for many reasons.Mr. Reeves said, “I hope that the (BIN) laws will be like a HOLY BIBLE”, stating that it was important for every officers to live in the confined of the laws and code of conducts in discharging their normal duties.According to he, many officers have diminish themselves for little or nothing from foreigners in and around Monrovia, something he describes as embarrassing for the heads of (BIN).Mr. Reeves said, a measure for salary before assignment has been put in placed along with other equipment needed for operation before departing to the various borders.He noted that the need to straightening the borders line was important as inspection in these areas because it the  major responsibility for officers like the newly employed officers.According to the United Nations mission in Liberia (UNMIL), special advisor for (BIN) said, “you must be discipline and responsible on duty as officers formed at the borders line wanting to work perfectly for your country.Every component that is Administration, Operation and Naturalization will need you at any time, commit yourself for work at the (BIN), but he said the code of conduct should be observed at every time for operational line,” he asserted.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more