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Report gives U.S. low marks on health and wellness

first_imgAccording to the World Economic Forum’s first Human Capital Report, the U.S. ranked 43rd among 112 countries in the Health and Wellness category, which measured a country’s ability to develop and deploy a healthy workforce. It received particularly low scores in obesity, the impact on business of noncommunicable diseases, and stress. The report was co-authored by David Bloom, Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography at Harvard School of Public Health.The report evaluated countries based on three other categories: Education,Workforce and Employment, and Enabling Environment (infrastructure, legal framework, and social mobility). Overall, the United States placed 16th, with Switzerland receiving the highest overall marks.The report was issued October 1, 2013.The report drew from publicly available data produced by international organizations such as the World Health Organization, the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, and the International Labour Organization, in addition to survey data from the World Economic Forum and Gallup. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Owens, Badgers reunite in NCAA tournament

first_imgJust after finishing his playing career with the Wisconsin men’s basketball team back in 2004, Freddie Owens had not quite considered himself to be coaching material.Greg Gard, an assistant coach then and the associate head coach now, admits that at the time he did not see Owens, a hero of the 2003 NCAA tournament, in a suit and tie along the bench either.But after a short lived professional career came to a close in 2006, Owens found himself coaching at the grassroots level of the game and slowly began working his way up.He eventually turned his eye back on Madison in 2010 and applied for the open assistant coach position on Bo Ryan’s staff, and the head coach even considered Owens a finalist for the job.But, despite having once picked out Owens for a future coach, Ryan felt the timing just was not right.“Freddie just didn’t have the years of experience yet,” Ryan said.As a coach should, Ryan remained encouraging, telling Owens to gain more experience and reminding him that things have a funny way of coming back around.But coaching against Owens probably was not what Ryan meant.After leaving Wisconsin without a job, Owens stayed at his assistant coach position at Montana – the very team the NCAA selection committee paired with Wisconsin in the first round of this year’s tournament.The two teams tip off Thursday in Albuquerque at 1:10 p.m. central.“We were [excited] just trying to figure out what seed they were going to give us,” Owens said. “But once we saw that we got a 13-seed, and let alone, against my alma mater, it was an awesome deal. Everyone’s real excited around here.”With Owens on the other end of the sideline, the game will reunite Ryan and the rest of the Badgers with the man responsible for one of the program’s fondest memories.In the second round of the 2003 NCAA tournament – Ryan’s second year at UW – 5-seed Wisconsin faced a 13-point deficit against 13-seed Tulsa with 3:36 remaining. But the Badgers put together a vintage March Madness comeback and pulled within two points with 12 seconds remaining.In the game’s waning moments, Devin Harris sprinted upcourt with the ball, worked off a high ball screen, drove to the lane and dished it to a wide-open Owens in the corner.Owens rose up and sunk the three with one second left, topping off one of the best come-from-behind victories in program history.The year before, he also ended Michigan State’s 53-game home win by hitting the game-winner with 25 seconds left.“That expression, ‘It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, but the fight in the dog,’ and Freddie – he’d be a poster guy for that saying,” Ryan said, claiming Owens was better known for his defense. “Tough. Played hard.”A native of Milwaukee, the 6-foot-2 guard played for the Badgers from 2002-04, starting the final two years of his career, and helped UW win regular season Big Ten titles in 2002 and 2003 as well as a tournament banner in 2004.He was one of five players to average 10 points or more as a junior before averaging 6.8 points per game and coming in second on the team in assists as a senior.Following graduation, Owens zeroed in on continuing his playing career and waved off the idea of coaching.He recalls a story he heard from Harris, who, in 2004, was accompanied by Ryan in New York City for the NBA draft:“He was on the bus with coach Ryan, heading over to Madison Square Garden, and coach Ryan had mentioned to him, ‘I see Freddie getting into coaching one day,’” Owens recounted. “He told me that and I was like ‘No, I want to play. I’m fresh out of college; I’m ready to go make some money playing.’”But his talents didn’t take him too far. He played professionally in Latvia from 2005-06 before enlisting as an AAU coach for a year to stay close to the game.“It’s the next best thing to playing,” Owens said. “I started coaching at AAU and really fell in love with … game-planning and mentoring young kids.”Now 30 years old, Owens helps lead a Montana (25-6) team that features nearly five players averaging double figures and has won its last 14 games, winning its conference tournament in the process. Meanwhile, Wisconsin (24-9) is fresh off a semifinal loss in the Big Ten tournament and finished in fourth place during the regular season.That built a relatively strong likelihood the two teams could be paired together to kick off the tournament’s first weekend. Ryan said he had a feeling it could happen, and once it was confirmed Sunday, Owens and the UW coaching staff made sure to exchange quick pleasantries before diving into the strategizing.“‘Congrats on the season up to this point and see you in New Mexico,’” Owens said. “Pretty short and brief just because both sides have a lot of work to do.”The thought of going up against the Grizzlies – or, as UW’s dubbed them: “The Fighting Freddie Owenses” – had Ryan smiling after the selection as well. But Ryan knows that Owens gives the Grizzlies an extra dose of familiarity not too often seen outside the Big Ten.“Freddie might be the most popular guy with [Montana head coach Wayne Tinkle] right now,” he said.But that hasn’t prevented anyone at Wisconsin from smiling at the thought of him as Thursday approaches. As might be expected, everyone’s happy to see him rising in the ranks of the profession – but they’d like him to hold off on any March Madness magic just this time.“He works really hard; he always stays in touch,” Gard said. “I’m happy for Freddie.“We’ll see how happy I am Thursday afternoon.”last_img read more

Rondina powers UST past Adamson in 3 sets for 2nd win

first_imgNueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed Golden Tigresses head coach Kung Fu Reyes said it was, ironically, Adamson head coach Air Padda that gave them the motivation against the Lady Falcons.“The players wrote the articles where coach Air said that UST won’t win relying on just one person alone,” said Reyes in Filipino. “They had a different response when a different coach made the same observation.”After UST labored just to get the second set, the Golden Tigresses had a steadier path come the third set.The Golden Tigresses were in firm control of Adamson in the third set leading 10-3 early on, although this was an error on Lady Falcon Chiara Permentilla’s part, Alina Bicar then had two straight service aces to give UST a 16-9 lead.Rondina finished the match with a game-high 22 points while Carla Sandoval added nine.ADVERTISEMENT Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano UK plans Brexit celebrations but warns businesses may suffer Undermanned University of Santo Tomas blanked Adamson University, 25-9, 31-29, 25-19, to earn its second win in the UAAP Season 80 women’s volleyball tournament Sunday at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENT Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano View comments Jema Galanza led Adamson with 10 points.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ GALLERY: Barangay Ginebra back as PBA Governors’ Cup kings It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Russians face unfamiliar wait for first Olympic gold Leaning on Cherry Rondina anew, the Golden Tigresses improved to 2-2 and created a massive four-way logjam at the third spot with the Lady Falcons, Ateneo, and Far Eastern University.Hit with injuries, UST played without two key players in libero Rica Rivera (leg) and hitter Milena Alessandrini (shoulder).FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkAlessandrini’s absence meant that UST had to find a replacement for the 11.7 scoring average the Filipino-Italian rookie brings to the table for the Golden Tigresses.UST’s offensive spark, apart from Rondina, came from Dimdim Pacres, who had 13 points against the Lady Falcons. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Sea turtle trapped in net freed in Legazpi City Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

S.D. race offers fall electoral preview

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsOne ad by the National Republican Campaign Committee says Democrat Francine Busby helped preside over a skyrocketing deficit while serving on a school board and voted to lay off teachers. She “even praised a teacher reported to have child porn, saying he was always willing to lend a hand,” one ad said, a charge she disputed as despicable as well as untrue. Ordinarily, an election in reliably Republican San Diego wouldn’t draw much national attention. In this case, Democrats sense an opportunity to score at least a psychological victory if Busby can come close to Bilbray when the votes are cast on June 6. If Busby outpolls Bilbray and wins the seat, it would lend enormous credence to the Democrats’ claim that they are on the road to capturing control of the House. Either way, Democratic fundraising would get a boost headed into the fall. Democrats must gain 15 seats to gain a majority. WASHINGTON – There’s no room for the politically squeamish in the special election for what normally would be a safely Republican congressional seat around San Diego to replace convicted former Rep. Randy “Duke” Cunningham. The two political parties, feeding voters a steady diet of attack ads, are on track to spend a staggering $4 million or more combined in what amounts to a costly, caustic preview of the fall battle for control of the House. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee depicts Republican Brian Bilbray as a veteran of Washington’s revolving door, a former congressman who has also lobbied for the maker of a drug suspected in dozens of deaths and an energy firm that was sued for price gouging. “So while he may not shake things up in Congress he knows how to shake them down,” one commercial says. For their part, Republicans are outspending Democrats significantly House Speaker Dennis Hastert held a fund-raiser for Bilbray. Equally important, Hastert sat down with conservative Republican Eric Roach, one of several party officials who urged him not to run as an independent in the June election. Roach recently announced he would step aside.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more