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Lecture examines development challenges, economic prospects

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Bart W. Edes, the Asian Development Bank’s representative in North America, addresses challenges and advancements that affect developing Asian countries. He lectured in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday to promote an awareness of the Asian Development Bank’s mission, which involves reducing poverty.The ADB, Edes said, does not work the same way many other banks do. “We’re a bit of a mix between a commercial bank and a program like the United Nations Development Program,” Edes said. “Our overarching mission is not to make money and give the dividends to our shareholders but to fight poverty and promote inclusive, sustainable development in developing nations.” To this end, he said the ADB is involved in financing development all across Asia in a variety of ways, from reforming education in Nepal to implementing clean energy initiatives in the Philippines to building railways in Bangladesh to constructing infrastructure for safe water in Uzbekistan. While most of what the ADB does has to do with funding projects, its employees also conduct research on economic trends of development in Asian countries over recent years.  “In the latest estimates for 2018 for developing Asia — so not including countries such as Japan — we’re looking at about a 6.3 percent increase in gross domestic product,” Edes said.Meanwhile, the United States achieved 2.4 percent growth over the same period, Edes said. The Asian economic sector appears to be one of the most quickly growing and developing that there is, Edes said.“Asian countries are working in ever more integrated and cooperative ways,” he said. When it comes to tourism, for instance, 60 percent of Chinese travelers stay inside the region, which is incredibly important to small Asian countries with large tourism industries, Edes said. The Maldives, for example, attribute 83 percent of its gross domestic product to the tourism industry, he said. While the region is experiencing rapid economic growth and development in some areas, it is still also facing a number of challenges such as poverty, climate change — which can exacerbate monsoons, storms, mudslides and other natural phenomena common to the region — and an aging population. “Asia is among the most vulnerable areas of the world when it comes to climate change,” Edes said. “This could lead to a real humanitarian crisis. We are responding in part by doubling down on our investments on climate change mitigation.” Edes said the ADB is currently committed to putting six billion dollars into countering climate change by 2020. With longevity going up and fertility rates going down across the board in Asia, the aging population may soon create a problem in some Asian countries. Edes said. A similar trend is occurring in other countries across Asia, which could lead to economic trouble as a diminishing workforce has to work increasingly hard for a growing body of dependent citizens. “By 2030, we will have almost 30 percent of Japan’s population at an age of 65 or older,” he said. Tags: ADB, Asian Development Bank, Bart W. Edes, development, Jenkins Nanovic Hall The North American representative for the Asian Development Bank (ADB) — an institution seeking to reduce poverty in Asia and the Pacific — Bart W. Edes, spoke in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday about his experience working for the ADB for the past 16 years and the lessons he has learned about economic growth, development and challenges facing some developing Asian countries.last_img read more

League of Women voters still conducting its judicial survey

first_img July 15, 2001 Regular News League of Women voters still conducting its judicial survey Florida judges still have time to participate in a confidential survey that will be used to help educate voters about the value of an independent judiciary and the important balance between the three branches of government. Mimi Jones of the Tallahassee League of Women Voters said the organization has solved a computer glitch which may have prevented some judges from completing the online survey asking about the day-to-day realities of the threat to judicial independence. Every state judge should have received a letter inviting participation in the survey, and the league has sent out another round of letters encouraging those who have yet to respond, or had a problem in responding, to do so now. “The initial password caused a problem,” Jones said. “We have removed the password, and now all the judges have to do is log on. Because every judge uses the same logon, anonymity is still assured.” Questions on the survey include: • During recent judicial elections in Florida, have incidents arisen regarding inappropriate negative or misleading campaign advertising? • Are you ever conscious of the possible ramifications of making an unpopular court ruling? • Has this affected your decisions? Do you believe this has influenced the decisions of other judges? • Are you aware of any misleading or unfair criticism of individual decisions or personal attacks on judges in your circuit? • Should the legislature remove the budget authority of the chief justice and transfer it to the executive branch? • Should the legislature be allowed to supersede judicial rulemaking, as some legislators have proposed? • What issues or concerns have arisen in your circuit regarding judicial appointments? The Tallahassee League of Women Voters received a $3,000 grant from the Open Society Institute to conduct the survey. The goal of the survey is not only to publish the results, expected by the end of September, and encourage media coverage of the findings, but also to continue to educate voters about the issues at election time. “We are getting some wonderful, interesting, varied returns,” Jones said. Judges who have questions about the survey or are encountering problems in accessing the survey may call Jones at (850) 942-7199. League of Women voters still conducting its judicial surveylast_img read more

Soursop Fruit 100 Fold Stronger At Killing Cancer Than Chemotherapy

first_img Share HealthLifestyleLocalNews Soursop Fruit 100 Fold Stronger At Killing Cancer Than Chemotherapy by: – March 17, 2012 Share Share Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! 50 Views   no discussions The fruit’s extracts from Annona muricata tree selectively inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells.The Soursop is a flowering, evergreen tree native to tropical regions of the world. It also contains a long, prickly green fruit which happens to kill cancer up to 10,000 times more effectively than strong chemotherapy drugs, all without the nasty side effects and withour harming healthy cells.According to Cancer Research UK, Annona muricata is an active principle in an herbal remedy marketed under the brand name Triamazon. The licensing for this product in the UK is not accepted due to its enormous healing effects on the body and potential loss of profits for competing pharmaceutical cancer drugs.This tree is low and is called graviola in Brazil, guanabana in Spanish and has the uninspiring name “soursop” in English. The fruit is very large and the subacid sweet white pulp is eaten out of hand or, more commonly, used to make fruit drinks and sherbets. Besides being a cancer remedy, graviola is a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent for both bacterial and fungal infections, is effective against internal parasites and worms, lowers high blood pressure and is used for depression, stress and nervous disorders. Deep within the Amazon Rainforest, this tree grows wild and could literally revolutionize what you, your doctor, and the rest of the world thinks about cancer treatment and chances of survival. Research shows that with extracts from this miraculous tree it now may be possible to: * Attack cancer safely and effectively with an all-natural therapy that does not cause extreme nausea, weight loss and hair loss * Protect your immune system and avoid deadly infections * Feel stronger and healthier throughout the course of the treatment * Boost your energy and improve your outlook on lifeThe source of this information is just as stunning: It comes from one of America’s largest drug manufacturers, the fruit of over 20 laboratory tests conducted since the 1970’s. What those tests revealed was nothing short of mind numbing…Extracts from the tree were shown to:* Effectively target and kill malignant cells in 12 types of cancer, including colon, breast, prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer. * The tree compounds proved to be up to 10,000 times stronger in slowing the growth of cancer cells than Adriamycin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug! * What’s more, unlike chemotherapy, the compound extracted from the Graviola tree selectively hunts down and kills only cancer cells. It does not harm healthy cells!The amazing anti-cancer properties of the Graviola tree have been extensively researched–so why haven’t you heard anything about it?The drug industry began a search for a cancer cure and their research centered on Graviola, a legendary healing tree from the Amazon Rainforest.It turns out the drug company invested nearly seven years trying to synthesize two of the Graviola tree’s most powerful anti-cancer ingredients. If they could isolate and produce man-made clones of what makes the Graviola so potent, they’d be able to patent it and make their money back. Alas, they hit a brick wall. The original simply could not be replicated. There was no way the company could protect its profits–or even make back the millions it poured into research.As the dream of huge profits evaporated, their testing on Graviola came to a screeching halt. Even worse, the company shelved the entire project and chose not to publish the findings of its research!Preventdisease.comlast_img read more

AMEU Excites Nimba Populace

first_imgThe student population of Nimba County has something to smile about this New Year as the African Methodist Episcopal University (AMEU) and the Nimba County Community College seal a MOU to collaborate in providing access to quality education for students in the county.AMEU and NCCC over the weekend signed the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for a Dual Degree program (DDP) with emphasis on the English and Mass-Communication disciplines. The program which is considered a pilot academic project will be offered on the campus of NCCC in Sanniquelie.It presents a unique partnership between both institutions and provides a rare pathway for students enrolled at NCCC to earn quality, accessible, and affordable Associate’s and Bachelor’s degrees. The DDP is expected to commence in September of this year with two baccalaureate degree programs from AMEU.The MOU was signed on Friday, January 9, at the Ezzat Eid Resource Center on the Campuses of AMEU. The President of AMEU, Dr. Joseph T. Isaac and NCCC president, Dr. Yar D. Gonway-Gono, signed for their respective institutions.The DDP is based on a formal agreement between AMEU and NCCC under which students will spend three to five years completing requirements of both institutions. Students will be awarded an associate degree from the community college and a bachelor from the University.        The program also has a vision to help transform the deplorable education system in the country and place it on a proper footing for advancement of the youth who make up over 60% of the nation’s population. The beneficiaries of this program, though beginning with Nimba students, are those young people outside the nation’s capital where such opportunities tend to be concentrated.AMEU envisages an ambitious plan that is on the verge of transforming the education system of the country and provide quality education to a larger student population, many of whom are in the leeward counties, Dr. Isaac noted.This will also help to alleviate the pressure on students who in an effort to come down to Monrovia to obtain higher education have to hustle for school fees, transportation, shelter and fend for themselves.The AMEU president noted that he was happy and excited that the collaboration had gotten underway. He narrated that the DDP vision was conceived when he attended the World Innovative Summit for Education (WISE). Two months ago while on his way back from the US, he had the opportunity to attend the WISE in Qatar where educators from all over the world gathered to brainstorm about innovative ways to impact and reach a larger student population globally, said Dr. Isaac.WISE is an initiative of the Qatar Foundation (QF). It spends millions of dollars each year on the WISE with organizers inviting thousands of educators from different countries.“At the summit, we were challenged to become innovative about how we deliver education to our home institutions and think about new ways to develop education.One way we decided to make use of the knowledge we gained at the WISE is through collaboration like this, Dr. Isaac said, adding , “unfortunately, leaders in education in Liberia think the best way is to collaborate with foreign institutions. “It is so easy for us to call up institutions that we attended or we know of, most times big names, and collaborate with them.”“One thing we are not doing well is to collaborate internally, not just institution of higher learning, but with high schools as well. Even agencies and ministries of government do not collaborate as they should. There are a lot of things that we at the Universities and colleges can do to solve most of the problems we face in our education system when we collaborate with others,” declared Dr. Isaac.So while on his way back from the summit he decided to email Dr. Gonway-Gono and Dr. Levi Zangai of Bassa Community College. “And I told them we can bring AMEU to your campuses, because nothing is stopping us, just our thinking. We can start small with one or two programs so that your students, when they graduate, will not have to come to Monrovia unless they want to or unless we are not offering the program of their interest.”Dr Gono responded positively and the conversation started. She visited us first and we talked and she invited us over and they agreed to collaborate not just in the chosen disciplines, “but in other areas we are going to explore so that we can strengthen our capacities. So both faculties can have conversations and maybe we can do joint research and student exchange programs as well.He admonished his colleagues from other universities and colleges in Liberia to take advantage of the WISE program. He noted that the summit is free of charge, Qatar Foundation pays for everything.Dr. Gono, truly overwhelmed at the signing ceremony, commended her counterpart for conceiving the vision. “As an administration I have really been worried about the future of my students. So when this opportunity came I was really overjoyed,” she said.She indicated that the students at NCCC are very enthusiastic about education. “Our students, I can say, are over ambitious. They are eager to learn. They always want to do something. I can’t rest since we began talking about this program because they are always in my office inquiring about when the program will begin, said Dr. Gono, who won best Community College president of 2014. NCCC was also chosen as the CM of 2014.Meanwhile, the DDP is intended to help address two major national development issues. Firstly, the overarching problem of Liberia brain-drain and the need to decentralize socioeconomic development, especially access to higher education. The complexity and scale of the “brain-drain” exacerbated by the civil crisis and the current demand for decentralized social services requires integrated solutions to build around human development.It has been well established that in order to accelerate effective and efficient service delivery across Liberia, government and its partners, with the private sector included, need to develop and strengthen the capacity of county and local institutions.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more