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Waterstones selects Yorkshire producers to supply to in-branch café

first_imgYorkshire’s local foodstuffs will be on sale in Waterstones’ Café W, Coney Street, York, thanks to the book shop giant choosing local producers to supply the branch, such as Shipley bakery, Just Desserts.This decision has been applauded by Yorkshire’s Regional Food Group.Jamie Hanslip, bookshop manager at Waterstones York, said: “I am delighted to say that Café W at Waterstones York has been an incredible success, thanks in no small part to the support of our fantastic local suppliers, who have really helped to build our reputation with their delicious produce. It gives us real pleasure to be able to champion the food of some of Yorkshire’s finest producers and the customer response has been brilliant.”Instead of using international coffee chains, Café W, Yorkshire sources 90% of food and drink in the café locally, to help boost the local economy.These local suppliers were selected by Waterstones with help from organisation DeliciouslyorkshireJo Satariano, marketing manager at Deliciouslyorkshire said: “It’s great news to see a national chain like Waterstones putting local food on their agenda. Being able to supply Café W at York is a fantastic opportunity for some of our smaller producers and we were thrilled to be able to help the Waterstones team find the local suppliers they needed to make the café a success.”Just Desserts, the Shipley-based bakery, will be supplying premium handmade desserts to the newly launched café.James O’Dwyer, managing director of the dessert company, said “Supplying the new Cafe W at Waterstones in York is hugely significant and it’s great that they are offering their customers a local flavour by championing the best food and drink from the region.“To be associated with a high-profile company sends out positive messages about how we are perceived as a supplier. It also helps to raise our local and national profile, as well as providing a solid platform to develop new business and further extend our distribution area.”Café W is a concept being rolled out nationally by Waterstones, which now has 20 bookshops housing the unique coffee and food shops. More are scheduled to open in 2014.last_img read more

University opens first new school in nearly a century

first_imgKnown as the Donald R. Keough School of Global Affairs, Notre Dame’s first new school in nearly a century opened this fall.Intended for both undergraduate and graduate students, the Keough School’s website said the school is focused on advancing integral human development through research, policy and practice. After the University announced its creation in 2014, history professor R. Scott Appleby was named the Marilyn Keough dean of the school.“The Keough School is a key player in fulfilling the University’s goal of internationalization,” Appleby said in an email. “All of Notre Dame’s college and schools, as well as Notre Dame International, are active and important participants in this effort.”According to the Keough School’s website, the school, which is based in the newly-constructed Jenkins and Nanovic Halls, addresses topics such as poverty, war, disease, political oppression, environmental degradation and other threats to dignity and human flourishing.Appleby said this year the school will focus on faculty, students and global policy studies in addition to working on new programs: one for undergraduates and one in policy studies with both a presence in Washington, D.C. and a network of international experts. The Keough School’s Master program in global affairs is already teaching its first class of students who came from areas across the world.Over the next three to five years, Appleby said the Keough School plans to continue this building phase.“We will continue to build a world class international faculty, welcome hundreds of gifted graduate and undergraduate students into the School and extend our networks of engagement and influence into the worlds of applied research, policy and practice of human rights, good governance, international development, peace-building and related areas,” Appleby said.Ted Beatty, associate dean for academic affairs at the Keough School, said alongside participating in pre-existing programs managed by various institutes that will be expanded in the School, undergraduate students will eventually have the opportunity to participate in a comprehensive program of global affairs.“This program of global affairs will be a program that organizes what [students] do in their majors, supplemental majors or minors, language study, study abroad … in a way that integrates together and forms a coherent program of study,” Beatty said.The pre-existing seven institutes under the Keough School are The Center for Civil and Human Rights, the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development, the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies and the Nanovic Institute for European Studies.“One thing the Keough School does is re-organize those [institutes] together under one roof,” Beatty said. “We inherit some programs from the institutes. We’ll then build up from those and create some exciting new opportunities for Notre Dame undergraduates.”Appleby said he expects the full-fledged undergraduate program — which will aim to complement and globalize the disciplinary major — will begin with a relatively small number of students next year before growing in the coming years.“Short of enrolling in the full program, or in a supplementary major or minor in the Keough School, undergrads can also take individual courses offered by the School,” Appleby said. “In addition, there are and will be an array of extracurricular options for students, ranging from guest lectures and mini-seminars led by prominent world leaders, to applied research opportunities designed to complement regular coursework and stimulate global thinking.”After three years of “frenetic planning and recruiting” with the seven institutes and colleagues from Notre Dame’s other colleges and schools, Appleby said the Keough School received a new burst of energy upon its opening.“I am heartened but not surprised by the excitement and enthusiasm generated by the opening of the Keough School — expressions of which arrive daily from the Notre Dame family of alums and other fervent supporters, as well as from peers at other universities in the United States and around the world,” Appleby said.As for long-term goals, Appleby said he looks forward to seeing his successor leverage the resources that Notre Dame and its supporters have provided.“I’d wager that before too long, the Keough School and its faculty and graduates will be recognized as a world leader in placing human dignity at the center of every effort to build peace, heal the afflicted, stimulate economic growth and ensure education and security for the most vulnerable populations on the planet,” Appleby said.Tags: kellogg institute for international studies, Keough School of Global Affairs, Kroc Institutelast_img read more

League of Women voters still conducting its judicial survey

first_img July 15, 2001 Regular News League of Women voters still conducting its judicial survey Florida judges still have time to participate in a confidential survey that will be used to help educate voters about the value of an independent judiciary and the important balance between the three branches of government. Mimi Jones of the Tallahassee League of Women Voters said the organization has solved a computer glitch which may have prevented some judges from completing the online survey asking about the day-to-day realities of the threat to judicial independence. Every state judge should have received a letter inviting participation in the survey, and the league has sent out another round of letters encouraging those who have yet to respond, or had a problem in responding, to do so now. “The initial password caused a problem,” Jones said. “We have removed the password, and now all the judges have to do is log on. Because every judge uses the same logon, anonymity is still assured.” Questions on the survey include: • During recent judicial elections in Florida, have incidents arisen regarding inappropriate negative or misleading campaign advertising? • Are you ever conscious of the possible ramifications of making an unpopular court ruling? • Has this affected your decisions? Do you believe this has influenced the decisions of other judges? • Are you aware of any misleading or unfair criticism of individual decisions or personal attacks on judges in your circuit? • Should the legislature remove the budget authority of the chief justice and transfer it to the executive branch? • Should the legislature be allowed to supersede judicial rulemaking, as some legislators have proposed? • What issues or concerns have arisen in your circuit regarding judicial appointments? The Tallahassee League of Women Voters received a $3,000 grant from the Open Society Institute to conduct the survey. The goal of the survey is not only to publish the results, expected by the end of September, and encourage media coverage of the findings, but also to continue to educate voters about the issues at election time. “We are getting some wonderful, interesting, varied returns,” Jones said. Judges who have questions about the survey or are encountering problems in accessing the survey may call Jones at (850) 942-7199. League of Women voters still conducting its judicial surveylast_img read more

Colliers goes against the trend to join AIM

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