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Studying art by making it

first_imgHistorically, Harvard has valued the head over the hand, but that may soon shift — at least in one discipline.Under the auspices of Jennifer L. Roberts, the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities, and Ethan Lasser, Theodore E. Stebbins Jr. Curator of American art at the Harvard Art Museums, graduate students, particularly those in art history, are joining a University movement against what Roberts calls a “longstanding, multi-century bias toward conceptual and mathematical, verbal, abstract forms of knowledge over the forms of knowledge embedded in making.”As their class “Minding Making: Art History and Artisanal Intelligence” goes through its second iteration, students are learning how hands-on experience with materials and processes feeds a different kind of awareness and a new appreciation of the finished product.Part of a larger project, detailed at mindingmaking.org, the class follows several summer graduate workshops, as well as a broader trend toward recognizing art-making as part of the University’s “cognitive life,” said Roberts. “The humanities are in the middle of what’s known as the material turn,” she explained. “There’s a lot of interest in matter and materiality, but that hasn’t really yet translated into a clear new way of thinking about making, about interacting with all that material.”,“Maker is a generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship.” — Professor Jennifer Roberts, pictured below with Ethan Lasser,This course seeks to address this tactical way of thinking, with readings on the intellectual history of crafts, as well as visits to artists, artisans, and their workplaces, including an aluminum casting factory.“Maker,” Roberts explained, is a “generic term that would encompass both the ceramicist and the person soldering together a circuit. We wanted a term that moves beyond studio art-making or craft artisanship. Art historians tend not to go to factories. They’re not interested in mass production. There are a lot of assumptions about what someone does.”“Art history,” added Lasser, “is constructed around a finished object, and the power of this approach is in going back through it and understanding what it takes to get to that object.”In Roberts’ words, the practitioners seek to “get outside the library and books for sources of knowledge.” Lasser elaborated, explaining that the goal of the course is to provide “a sense of the feel, the tactile knowledge, of how much physical labor goes into something.”“At every stage,” he said, “there’s some information that art historians don’t generally write about because they don’t know about, because they’re just looking at the finished object.”,On a stormy Friday, students were involved in another element of the course, trying their hands at etching: from the first preparation of the plates through printing. The work is laborious, and students such as Destiny Crowley of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences were spending considerable time applying the thick black ink and then wiping it nearly off before attempting to print a first proof.Speaking while she worked, Crowley, a first-year student in the history of art and architecture Ph.D. program, explained that she signed on to address “a gaping lack in my education when it came to the actual creation of art.” As she wiped the viscous ink over her plate, she noted how that also gave her additional insight into works she has long admired: the Blank Signs series of prints by artist Ed Ruscha, who hails from her home state of Oklahoma.“The aquatint gives the print a very light shade of coloring,” Crowley explained, describing Ruscha’s series. “And the signs themselves are left stark white.” Noting “the juxtaposition of moving from darkness to light, the pitch black of the ink, the deep blackish brown of the asphaltum ground that we had to apply to the plate,” she said, “I find it very interesting that the print ended up being such a bold interplay of lightness.”Working with the coal-black ink, she shared her insight. “It is really amazing how you can go from a really onyx black — almost a void on this space — and strip that away,” she said. “There’s a reason why artists choose the artistic processes they do, an etching versus an oil painting.”,“There are so many different reasons for choosing a material,” agreed Iain Gordon, who is pursuing a master’s in design studies. Unlike several of his classmates, Gordon, who was drying a treated plate, has been involved on the “making” side, building furniture as well as other projects for several years. “For me, this is a way to engage with the making in a theoretical and critical way,” he said.“I knew it would be time-consuming and unpredictable and a different kind of mental and physical energy,” said Rachel Vogel, who is in her second year of the Ph.D. program in the history of art and architecture. “But you don’t realize the extent of all of those things until you really start doing it.“Learning those kinds of chains of causality and being able to recognize how a particular choice an artist made might be a response to something else that’s happening in the print …” She paused as she continued to wipe ink off her etching plate. “To begin to unpack the layers that must have happened in order for the artist to have constructed a plate is something that really can only happen once you’ve had the experience of making prints yourself.”last_img read more

Advice available for lawyer reservists

first_img November 15, 2001 Regular News Advice available for lawyer reservists Advice available for lawyer reservists The Florida Bar’s Ethics Department With the tragic events that occurred on September 11, many reservists and National Guard personnel were mobilized to assist in the fight against terrorism. Some of those called to duty were members of The Florida Bar. Because of the possibility of a greater mobilization in the near future, it is important for attorneys who may be called to active duty to be adequately prepared to handle the impact on their law practice. While most reservists have a developed contingency plan to protect their clients and law practice, we have learned that some attorneys were not prepared for an immediate mobilization. Mobilization is especially difficult for solo practitioners who do not have the advantage of another attorney working in their office to assist in the transition of cases. Attorneys who practice in a firm have the benefit of allowing another attorney within the firm to handle client matters. The American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Legal Assistance for Military Personnel has posted some guidance on the ABA’s website which may be beneficial to sole practitioners who do not have a current mobilization plan which includes their law practice. The guidance includes an article entitled “Mobilization Readiness Advice for the Solo Attorney/Reservist.” The article offers tips on selecting an attorney to assist in the winding down of a law practice. Factors such as competence, experience, professionalism, and adequate malpractice coverage are primary considerations when selecting a designated attorney. Transitional conferences with the attorney and staff regarding status of cases are also suggested for at least the most pressing matters. The designated administering attorney would need to have an understanding of office systems such as conflict checks and calenders. It is also important that designated attorneys have access to locked storage facilities as well as passwords to obtain computer information. Most importantly, the trust account should be made accessible. Failure to have an authorized signatory on your account could require a court’s order to release client funds. Client notification is also discussed in the article. Clients should be notified of the possibility of an activation order once it appears that a mobilization is likely. Information provided in the notification would include a discussion of what to expect when activation occurs and the necessity that the client file be forwarded to another attorney. Notification and communication with your malpractice carrier is also critical. The article, as well as samples of suggested documents and checklists, can be viewed in its entirety at www.abanet.org. The Florida Bar has a link to the relevant section of the ABA website on its homepage at www.FLABAR.org. It should also be noted that the Military Affairs Committee of the Florida Bar is sponsoring a pro bono referral program to assist active duty military, recalled reservists, and recalled National Guardsmen with their legal needs. Those interested in volunteering should complete an application (provided below) and return it to the Military Affairs Committee staff liaison, Jennifer Wilson. Civilian attorneys and other local bar associations in the state should refrain from soliciting or otherwise directly contacting the military to provide assistance. The Florida Bar Military Affairs Committee will coordinate all necessary assistance and provide training for the volunteers. In addition, the Law Office Management Advisory Service of the Florida Bar (LOMAS) has information and materials available for attorneys who employ reservists. LOMAS can be contacted at (850) 561-5611.last_img read more

US ruling allows Martinez Sampedro family full disclosure on Codere investors

first_img Related Articles Codere records 10X losses seeking vital lifeline  May 28, 2020 Codere secures €250m credit lifeline on aggressive interest rates  July 14, 2020 Connecticut’s District Court has granted the Martinez Sampedro family a major concession in its ongoing legal dispute against Grupo Codere SA’s US debt-holders, upholding the family’s ‘discovery demand’ against Silver Point, Contrarian and Abrahams Capital hedge funds.Securing its Connecticut demand, the Martinez Sampedro family – enterprise founders of Codere – will be able to access all information related to the US hedge funds refinancing of the bankrupt Spanish gambling group undertaken between 2014 and 2016.As previously declared, Martinez Sampedro representatives intend to use its US demand in relation to the family’s corporate governance dispute being undertaken through Spain’s Capital Markets Commission (CNMV).“The decision to go to the Justice of Connecticut responds that it is in this State where the registered office of Silver Point and another of the funds demanded is located and the authorization marks an unprecedented procedural milestone in Spain,” detailed a Martínez Sampedro statement.A bitter two-year legal challenge sees the Martinez Sampedro family assert that US debt-holders led by Silver Point had failed to follow proper corporate control procedures in its €1 billion restructure of Codere, as deal stakeholders had ‘purposely bypassed’ recommending a takeover offer to founders once they had gained 30% control of the gambling group.Furthermore, the family states that its executive voting rights had been restricted during the period despite maintaining 18% of Codere’s shareholding, branding illegal the appointments of Vicente Di Loreto as new Group CEO and Norman Sorensen as Executive Chairman.This August, a CNMV filing disclosed that Codere governance had withdrawn outright the board representation of brothers’ Jose Antonio (former President) and Luis Javier (former VP) at the firm’s AGM. Codere avoids total collapse with 12-month credit line  June 22, 2020 Submit StumbleUpon Share Sharelast_img read more