Blogs

Visitors Board Warships in Cardiff

first_img Authorities View post tag: Navy View post tag: Cardiff View post tag: Visitors Share this article View post tag: UK Navy View post tag: News by topic Visitors Board Warships in Cardiff September 10, 2014center_img View post tag: Naval Back to overview,Home naval-today Visitors Board Warships in Cardiff Six ships – including the Royal Navy’s latest front-line Type 45 destroyer – were berthed in Cardiff Bay at the heart of a ‘military village’ in Britannia Park, which also featured equipment, displays and personnel from the Army and RAF.And on a hot, sunny Sunday the people of South Wales turned up in their thousands to see what today’s Armed Forces have to offer – one estimate put the total number of visitors throughout the day at more than 80,000.The ships had travelled to South Wales in support of the NATO summit at the Celtic Manor Hotel in nearby Newport, during which Duncan hosted a formal dinner on board for 28 NATO defence ministers.She and the other five warships – La Motte-Picquet (France), Skudd (Norway), Kursis (Lithuania), Urk (Netherlands) and Viesturs (Latvia) – were joined in Roath Basin by two Archer-class patrol boats, HM Ships Biter and Express, in welcoming visitors on board.Duncan saw more than 4,000 members of the public cross her gangway, while the two patrol boats – each with a ship’s company of just five – had attracted more than 200 people by early afternoon.Those stepping onto the destroyer’s flight deck in the morning were greeted by a dalek borrowed from the nearby BBC film studios – although this particular dalek sported an HMS Duncan cap and crest and was operated by a midshipman from Birmingham URNU, Michael Hooper.The event – formally opened by the First Minister of Wales, Carwyn Jones on board HNoMS Skudd – was a joint effort between the local authorities and the military, with the Naval Regional Commander for Wales and Western England, Cdre Jamie Miller, and his team putting in months of planning to ensure the event ran as smoothly as possible.Many elements of the Naval Service and wider Naval family were represented – members of the Royal Marines Band CTCRM played in small ensembles on the flight deck of Duncan and ashore, RN, RM and Maritime Reserves recruiters were evident and Cardiff branch of the RNA also manned a stall.[mappress]Press Release, September 10, 2014; Image: UK Navy Visitors flocked to a flotilla of NATO warships when Cardiff hosted a Meet the Forces day – although those stepping aboard HMS Duncan were confronted by one of the most dangerous aliens in the universe. View post tag: europe View post tag: Warships View post tag: boardlast_img read more

Lecture examines development challenges, economic prospects

first_imgRosie LoVoi | The Observer Bart W. Edes, the Asian Development Bank’s representative in North America, addresses challenges and advancements that affect developing Asian countries. He lectured in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday to promote an awareness of the Asian Development Bank’s mission, which involves reducing poverty.The ADB, Edes said, does not work the same way many other banks do. “We’re a bit of a mix between a commercial bank and a program like the United Nations Development Program,” Edes said. “Our overarching mission is not to make money and give the dividends to our shareholders but to fight poverty and promote inclusive, sustainable development in developing nations.” To this end, he said the ADB is involved in financing development all across Asia in a variety of ways, from reforming education in Nepal to implementing clean energy initiatives in the Philippines to building railways in Bangladesh to constructing infrastructure for safe water in Uzbekistan. While most of what the ADB does has to do with funding projects, its employees also conduct research on economic trends of development in Asian countries over recent years.  “In the latest estimates for 2018 for developing Asia — so not including countries such as Japan — we’re looking at about a 6.3 percent increase in gross domestic product,” Edes said.Meanwhile, the United States achieved 2.4 percent growth over the same period, Edes said. The Asian economic sector appears to be one of the most quickly growing and developing that there is, Edes said.“Asian countries are working in ever more integrated and cooperative ways,” he said. When it comes to tourism, for instance, 60 percent of Chinese travelers stay inside the region, which is incredibly important to small Asian countries with large tourism industries, Edes said. The Maldives, for example, attribute 83 percent of its gross domestic product to the tourism industry, he said. While the region is experiencing rapid economic growth and development in some areas, it is still also facing a number of challenges such as poverty, climate change — which can exacerbate monsoons, storms, mudslides and other natural phenomena common to the region — and an aging population. “Asia is among the most vulnerable areas of the world when it comes to climate change,” Edes said. “This could lead to a real humanitarian crisis. We are responding in part by doubling down on our investments on climate change mitigation.” Edes said the ADB is currently committed to putting six billion dollars into countering climate change by 2020. With longevity going up and fertility rates going down across the board in Asia, the aging population may soon create a problem in some Asian countries. Edes said. A similar trend is occurring in other countries across Asia, which could lead to economic trouble as a diminishing workforce has to work increasingly hard for a growing body of dependent citizens. “By 2030, we will have almost 30 percent of Japan’s population at an age of 65 or older,” he said. Tags: ADB, Asian Development Bank, Bart W. Edes, development, Jenkins Nanovic Hall The North American representative for the Asian Development Bank (ADB) — an institution seeking to reduce poverty in Asia and the Pacific — Bart W. Edes, spoke in Jenkins Nanovic Hall on Monday about his experience working for the ADB for the past 16 years and the lessons he has learned about economic growth, development and challenges facing some developing Asian countries.last_img read more

Cocaine Discovered in France in Container of Chilean Seafood

first_imgBy Dialogo July 13, 2012 A shipment of around 21.6 kg of cocaine, worth 1.3 million euros, was discovered in the port of Le Havre (in northern France), in a container of frozen mussels from Chile, the French customs service announced on July 12. According to the preliminary results of the customs investigation, the cocaine was introduced into the container without the knowledge of the shipper or recipient. The traffickers replaced the container’s original seal after introducing the drugs. This technique, which is being used with increasing frequency, according to the customs service, was employed to transport 113 kg of cocaine seized in this port in June. In that case, the merchandise, with an estimated worth of 7 million euros, was placed in a container of cans of tuna from Ecuador. Separately, on June 21, customs officials seized 3.5 kg of cocaine in the port of Le Havre in a container of personal effects coming from Surinam and destined for Holland. The drugs, hidden in thermos bottles and in the speakers of a computer, were discovered by a trained dog.last_img read more

Orange seek 1st win over ranked opponent since 2015

first_img Published on October 3, 2018 at 11:13 pm Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrew Comments One day after losing 3-0 to No. 3 BYU, Syracuse led No. 10 Southern California, 2-0.In the third set, Syracuse fell behind 6-1 early and couldn’t recover. In the fourth, USC’s 15-4 lead proved insurmountable. And in the fifth, the Orange couldn’t flip the momentum and lost, 15-13. The next day, SU lost to their third ranked opponent in as many days, a 3-1 decision to No. 25 Marquette.“We were right there with those teams, it wasn’t like they destroyed us,” senior middle blocker Santita Ebangwese said. “We were making them nervous.”Less than a month later, the Orange (8-4, 4-0 Atlantic Coast) find themselves off to their best ACC start in program history, and enter this weekend as one of three undefeated teams in the conference.On Friday, Syracuse matches up with No. 8 Pittsburgh (15-0, 4-0), a team they haven’t beaten since 2015. If the Orange are to upset their first ranked opponent since that same season, they will have to finish, something they’ve failed to do against top 25 teams this season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Pittsburgh will definitely come in with high confidence,” associate head coach Erin Little said. “For us to be able to match that, knowing the opponents that we faced and how we played against those will only help us here.”Pittsburgh, one of two undefeated teams in the country, currently hold their highest ranking in program history. The Panthers enter Friday’s matchup winners of their last 13 ACC matches, dating back to last season.Laura Angle | Digital Design EditorThrough 12 matches in 2018, Syracuse has dominated the net defensively, posting a conference-best 2.8 blocks per game, but will have to defend against Pittsburgh’s front row, which tallies 14.4 kills per set, first in the ACC.The keys for Syracuse are to serve aggressively, contain the balanced Pitt offense and be smart in how they set up their blocks, Little said.“It goes back to the saying ‘Defense wins games,’” senior Amber Witherspoon said. “It’s good for them to be a good offensive team, but we’re going to try to come back with our defense and our blocks.”Even if the Orange aren’t able to get the block, Ebangwese said, a strong game at the net allows Syracuse to set up their offense.The return of redshirt senior Christina Oyawale has helped SU’s presence at the net. After an ankle injury forced her to miss seven matches, she returned in a Sept. 23 win over Clemson and finished second on the team with three blocks.“(Oyawale) puts up a nice block,” Ebangwese said, “and she also deters some hitting outside, like bouncing balls and helping with the momentum.”Facing a team that’s 35-5 at home since 2016, the Orange need to create their own momentum to eliminate Pitt’s home court advantage.“We’re used to that (road) type of atmosphere … we’re used to being cheered against,” Witherspoon said. “We honestly thrive off of that. It’s like, ‘We’ll show you who we are … you’re going to know our name.’”Despite their historic start, Syracuse knows that they have to clean up parts of their game, or as Ebangwese puts it, “dotting our I’s and crossing our T’s,” in order to continue their run.“Some things we were able to get away with against Wake Forest,” she said, “we won’t be able to get away with against Pitt.”center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more