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Rents declined on most Asia-Pacific retail strips last year

first_img Tags Hong Kong rent has toppled over in the past year. (Getty)Rents declined on two-thirds of retail strips in the Asia Pacific region in pandemic-ravaged 2020.Hong Kong’s retail districts saw the most significant decline of any submarket in the region. Rents fell 43 percent over the year, according to a Cushman & Wakefield study reported by Business of Fashion. Still, Hong Kong remained the most expensive place in the region to rent retail space, followed by Tokyo and Sydney.Meanwhile, mainland China saw the lowest average rental declines in the region, just 5 percent, although price movement varied significantly between cities.Rents were down 14 percent for the year in Beijing’s Central Business District, while the Louhu District in Shenzhen — just north of Hong Kong’s border — saw a 5 percent increase.ADVERTISEMENTRents in some of Hong Kong’s highest-profile shopping districts hit 12-year lows last year as the pandemic worsened already declining rents. Fewer people traveled to Hong Kong than in previous years because of the pandemic and political upheaval in the territory.The overall Hong Kong property market slowed in 2020 but may be picking up again. Large real estate deals continue to close. In February, a five-bedroom unit at a luxury condo tower in Mid-Levels sold for a record $17,542 per square foot.[Business of Fashion] — Dennis Lynch Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink chinahong kongJapanRetail Real Estatelast_img read more

Mitch Stein Discusses His NOLA Roots, Promoting Concerts, Playing With Members Of The Dead & More [Interview]

first_imgIn April, the world-famous New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival will return to the Fair Grounds Race Course in celebration of the longstanding event’s 50th anniversary. Musician, bandleader, promoter, film producer, and modern-day musical Renaissance man Mitch Stein fell in love with Jazz Fest more than 25 years ago, and has been involved with the event’s annual festivities in some capacity ever since. This year, Stein will bring a plethora of hard-hitting late-night shows to Café Istanbul, including the 5th Annual all-star celebration of the Grateful Dead dubbed AXIAL TILT.As New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival approaches, Live For Live Music‘s Sam Berenson had a chat with Mitch Stein to discuss his love for New Orleans and its musical culture, the upcoming shows he’s promoting surrounding Jazz Fest, his love for the Grateful Dead and more.Sam Berenson: What initially inspired your interest in New Orleans’ music scene?Mitch Stein: I became familiar with New Orleans music at a relatively young age. My dad was a professional singer, and used to play big band and Dixieland/New Orleans records in the house on a very regular basis. I had already become a big fan of The Radiators by the late 1980’s, and my interest in them guided me towards my first trip to New Orleans. I first attended Jazz Fest more than 25 years ago, and it was on that first visit that Charles Neville (who I had booked years earlier with the Neville Brothers at a show in New York, when I was in college) invited me to sit in with him at Storyville.From that moment, I decided to attend every Jazz Fest I could, and with eternal thanks to Charles, I began my now decades-long immersive study of all things New Orleans. This also subsequently led to the formation of GATORATORS in 2012 with Dave Malone, Camile Baudoin, and Reggie Scanlan from The Radiators, plus drummer Eric Bolivar, with whom I had played music before he moved to NOLA from the Bay Area. The band has been playing together ever since.SB: What effect has being a musician and playing music had on your professional career in the industry?MS: I’ve been playing piano since I was 4 years old. I studied classical piano for 10 years, then switched to formal jazz training, including studying and performing at the Berklee College Of Music. In addition to my own projects, I have for years been a “hired gun” for other folks’ jazz, rock, blues, and funk projects, and my decades-long experience of being both a player and bandleader (and film producer) has provided me with the tools necessary to not only communicate and perform with other professional musicians and production professionals, but has paved the way for my now ongoing role as Exclusive Booker and Producer of the night-time Jazz Fest shows at Café Istanbul.SB: Is there anything you’re looking particularly forward to this year during Jazz Fest?MS: While I am extremely happy with this year’s calendar of phenomenal shows at Café Istanbul featuring New Orleans musicians nearly every night, I am admittedly very excited to host The Brecker Brothers Band on May 5th. The Breckers provided the soundtrack for a large segment of my musically formative years, and it’s pretty cool to have things now come full circle, resulting in the upcoming show. The level of musicianship in that band is way off the charts, and while every show on the calendar is worth catching, this show will definitely be a “you-should-have-been-there” experience.SB: What’s the history behind your relationship with Café Istanbul?MS: I first reached out to the owner of Café Istanbul prior to Jazz Fest 2015 to pitch him on an all-star, 2-night celebration of the Grateful Dead called AXIAL TILT (timed with the Dead’s 50th Anniversary). He explained that he was already booked on my requested dates, and we said our goodbyes. A few minutes later, he called to say that he had been contemplating my proposal and was going to go with his gut, allow me the chance to produce the shows, and shift the folks already confirmed to another date.Those shows went so well that he asked if I would be interested in being the exclusive booker for all shows at Café Istanbul during Jazz Fest, and I jumped at the chance. This will be my fifth year booking shows there, and I am extremely appreciative to have been given this opportunity. I am even happier that in addition to thoroughly enjoying the high-level music performed at the shows they attend, folks who pack the place every night really love the overall experience the venue and its staff provides.SB: You’re clearly a big fan of the Grateful Dead. How did you your relationship with the band/music begin?MS: As mentioned before, I had been studying classical piano for 10 years, and was then immersed in formal jazz training when a friend of mine called to tell me that he had an extra ticket for a rock concert and asked if I wanted to join him. I hadn’t yet heard of the Grateful Dead, and assumed by their name that they were some type of hard rock band. When I went to my first Dead show, I quickly discovered to my now lifelong delight that this wasn’t a rock band per se, but a jazz band performing in the rock idiom. The level of musicianship and onstage communication between the band members was stunning, and I was hooked from the first show.I bought a ticket for the following night’s show and was again delighted to discover that not a single song was repeated from the night before. I could spend a LONG time talking about the myriad ways that the Grateful Dead and their music has positively affected my life; suffice it to say that having seen nearly 400 Grateful Dead concerts (plus another 300 or so solo Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Phil Lesh and other band members’ solo and collaborative projects), the Dead’s music—and its direct relationship to the world of Jazz—is very much a part of my DNA. I have now officially performed music with every living member of the Grateful Dead, and I feel very fortunate that living and working in the San Francisco area offers me regular opportunities to celebrate them and their music.As a New Orleans side note for those unaware, the Neville Brothers opened for the Grateful Dead at eight of their shows, Dirty Dozen Brass Band and Michael Doucet & BeauSoleil each opened once, and Branford Marsalis joined them on several occasions. Other notable jazz-oriented live Grateful Dead show collaborators include Billy Cobham, Charles Lloyd, David Murray, Etta James, Flora Purim, Ken Nordine, and Ornette Coleman.SB: Tell me a little bit about the formation of your “AXIAL TILT” event.MS: As I mentioned earlier, AXIAL TILT began in 2015 as a 2-night celebration of the Grateful Dead’s 50th Anniversary. I assembled an incredible tribute ensemble comprised largely of members of the Dead’s extended family including Stu Allen (Phil Lesh & Friends), Rob Eaton (Dark Star Orchestra), Robin Sylvester (RatDog), Jay Lane (RatDog), original Grateful Dead member and vocalist Donna Jean Godchaux, and Charles Neville. We are now getting ready for the fifth annual AXIAL TILT (the same lineup but with Joan Osborne on vocals and Dino English from Dark Star Orchestra on drums; Charles unfortunately passed away last year), and will once again present two nice, long evenings of live Grateful Dead nuggets. Each performance will include one acoustic and two electric sets per night, with no repeat of any songs.SB: What’s your fondest memory of Leo Nocentelli?MS: I’d have to say the very first time I saw Leo with The Meters in New Orleans many years ago. I was familiar with their music, but watching the actual Godfathers Of Funk in person for the first time, and hearing Leo’s ultra-familiar guitar riffs in real time and in person, was one of the highlights of all of my years attending Jazz Fest. To now have him performing exclusively at Café Istanbul this year during Jazz Fest’s night-time shows is one long “pinch me” moment. And since I am also a member of Voyager, I’ll also get to check off a personal bucket list item when I’ll have the chance to actually jam with him on April 27!SB: I see Eric Krasno is involved with a bunch of your late-nights. Where did that friendship begin?MS: While our paths have crossed many times over the years, this will be the first time that we’ll be working together. I have been a fan of Eric’s for many years, and have actually tried to book him the past couple of years I’ve been booking the Istanbul lineup. This is the first year that the scheduling gods have paved the way for our collaboration, and I am more than excited to experience his artistry on my “home turf” in musical conversation with folks like Leo Nocentelli, Jason Crosby, Johnny Vidacovich, Renard Poché, Reggie Scanlan, Mark Brooks, Will Bernard, Wil Blades, Jason Hann, and others.SB: So you live in the Bay Area now. Do you see any similarities between your local music scene and New Orleans’?MS: I often tell people that if I didn’t live in the Bay Area, I’d likely end up in New Orleans. There are many similarities between the two scenes, with the most obvious being that both areas are overflowing with exceedingly talented musicians and appreciators of music, and both have provided the world with “signature” musical styles and sounds that continue to be celebrated not only in their respective locales, but throughout the world. I consider it a privilege to be affiliated with both areas, and will continue to do all that I can to celebrate that connection. YEAH YOU RIGHT!AXIAL TILT is set to take place once again on May 2nd and 3rd at Café Istanbul during Jazz Fest in New Orleans, LA. For more information and tickets to AXIAL TILT and all the other nighttime Jazz Fest shows at Café Istanbul, head here.last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Monday, Jan. 27

first_imgUse caution when visiting MontrealJust a heads up to those traveling to Montreal, Canada.My daughter and I traveled to Montreal recently and parked in an outside small parking site in Old Montreal.Unfortunately, while seeing Notre Dame and having lunch in a very busy area with lots of people walking around and high rises all around us, her Jeep truck was broken into by the back-passenger window. An iPad, very expensive camera, insulin and other medicines were stolen.City police came, and we have a number of the incident. We went to Home Depot and bought tape and plastic to fix the window.Upon leaving Canada, talking with the officer at the New York border, we told him what took place in Old Montreal. He stated to us that it happens all the time and that Canadians are targeting trucks and New York State vehicles. Yes, we should have booked our hotel and dropped off everything first (lesson learned) and then proceeded to our venture in Old Montreal. It has been suggested that you rent a car if you are going to Canada, especially Montreal, by border patrols. Take heed all. It really spoiled our weekend and has left me feeling very angry.Deborah BowdishSchenectadyCuomo doesn’t care about New YorkersGov. Andrew Cuomo should stay in Puerto Rico and take the Democrats with him (Assembly and Senate). They can have full control there. The laws that are being passed in New York are so far of the rail that they’re killing this state.He should have never gotten a third term; you talk about obstruction and abuse of power. Instead of taking care of this state’s needs, our tax dollars are going elsewhere. New York was once a leader of industrial states, and our ports were doing well with imports and exports. Even the Port of Albany was doing well.Our economy was high due to construction, factories like GE, Ford, Bendix, Barkley Home products, Alco products, Bear Manning, paper mills, CDTA, taxi companies, downtown stores, Sears, Woolworth, Rudnick’s, outlets, soda shops for kids, Ellis Hospital, St. Clare’s Hospital, Bellview Hospital, carpet mills, auto dealerships, etc.What do we have today? Nothing. Cuomo doesn’t care if we have jobs or safety for our kids in school or for a safe state.He lets criminals out of jail to repeat their crimes and wants to disarm the law-abiding citizen.Would you say he has a mental capacity to be a leader? I don’t think so. All of the hunters in this state supported conservation when they bought a firearm, ammo for hunting, target- and competitive shooting. Without the hunters, who is going to take care of our wild animals and keep our woods safe?Claude Rizzicone, Jr.SchenectadyAlbany Civic Theater deserves coverageThe Gazette proclaims itself to be “The Voice of the Capital Region.”Albany has a major role in there being a Capital Region.Albany Civic Theater is in Albany, but The Gazette is too busy, understaffed or whatever else their excuse is for not reviewing Albany Civic Theater’s performances.Consider that Albany Civic Theater has already presented two terrific shows this season.Another, “American Soldiers” coming up starting Jan. 31.Will The Gazette find another excuse for passing on this Albany Civic Theater play, too?John DanielsDuanesburg Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionWestinghouse long overdue for a statueTrains were crashing. Brakemen on moving cars were losing life and limbs, until 22-year-old George Westinghouse, in 1868, invented an ingenious system.It allowed the engineer with a lever to safely apply brakes to all cars. The Westinghouse Air Brake remains the global standard.George Westinghouse grew up in Schenectady. He learned invention, manufacturing and marketing in the family Westinghouse Agricultural Works. He served as a shipboard engineer during the Civil War, attended Union College and launched a career with 300 patents and creation of 60 companies. He was scrupulously honest and fair with admiring employees.After Thomas Edison invented the electric light in 1879, he provided DC electricity to nearby customers. George Westinghouse designed lighting for Chicago World’s Fair and an AC system.It transferred high voltage electricity over long distances, starting with Niagara Falls to Buffalo. Westinghouse current continues to power the world.Analyzing the Westinghouse transformer-based AC system required new mathematics, for which Charles Steinmetz gained fame as the Wizard of Schenectady. He also created the electrical engineering program at Union College.Citizen Brian Merriam self-initiated nicely lighted statues of Thomas Edison and Charles Steinmetz on Erie Boulevard, with sponsorship by the Chamber of Commerce. Brian is now leading a team for a George Westinghouse statue for the empty adjacent plaza. A small portion of the Downtown Revitalization Initiative funding can make it an overdue reality.Frank WicksSchenectadyCome together to help pensionersIn the normal stimulus and response of life, there is a generally held convention that one good deed deserves another. Those who give help in a time of need deserve help if the tables turn.It is, therefore, time for the people of Schenectady to recognize and support the 1,100 retires of Saint Clare’s Hospital who served this community for decades and are now in need of help themselves.Over one year ago, they were informed that their retirement fund had failed and that they would not be receiving their pensions.As a result of the pension fund failure, the retires are now enduring severe financial hardships.Many are experiencing limitations to medical care and even nutrition. Some have died waiting for a resolution to this pension tragedy. Unfortunately, the search for a solution to this terrible problem has no end in sight.There are many and complex reasons for this catastrophic situation. However, one thing is certain: the retirees of St. Clare’s Hospital are not responsible for the failure of their pension fund.Every individual citizen, service group, fraternal organization and church group should speak out and demand that Gov. Andrew Cuomo, our legislators, church leaders and former fund managers come together to find a solution to this unnecessary suffering.Apathy in this situation is not an option. We, the citizens of Schenectady, are either part of the solution or we are part of the problem.William M. Vacca, MDNiskayunaThe writer is former chief of medicine at St. Clare’s Hospital.Inaction on climate will make it worseI am a volunteer for Citizens Climate Lobby, a nonprofit organization devoted to addressing the issue of climate change.With so many of the recent climate-related stories pointing to the worsening of climate change around the world (the brush fires in Australia, record heat in parts of Europe, the rapidly accelerating melting of large glaciers — just to name a few), it can be frightening to turn on the news nowadays. In fact, with some climate scientists saying that the worst effects of climate change cannot be avoided no matter what steps we take to address the problem, it can be tempting to ask the question, “Why bother if there is no hope?”Even if the worst effects of catastrophic climate change seem likely, doing nothing is simply not an option.Just about any step we take to mitigate the worsening of carbon dioxide levels or the rise of global temperatures would be beneficial for our children and grandchildren. The air would be cleaner, storms would be less severe, diseases would not spread as quickly, and world economies would not be crippled as quickly. If these seem only like holding actions, maybe so. But you never know when the political will to take effective corrective action will emerge or when new technologies might give us renewed hope. We simply cannot allow our planet to deteriorate unchecked. Doing nothing is not an option.Ross LenetGuilderland More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Twenty five former students come forward with new lawsuit against Tyndall, USC

first_imgAdditionally, Doe defendants 1 through 500, are alleged to have “engaged in a pattern and practice of ignoring complaints, failing to investigate sexual harassment and abuse complaints, deliberately concealing information from abuse victims as well as law enforcement and the Medical Board of California, and contributed to a sexually hostile environment on campus at USC,” according to the lawsuit. The identity and working capacities of these defendants are not yet known, but are said to comprise employees, agents or servants of USC who were under the University’s direct supervision. Content warning: This article contains explicit references to instances of sexual abuse, sexual harrassment, victim-blaming and harrassment based on gender and race. Twenty five former USC students have come forward with a new lawsuit against former campus gynecologist George Tyndall, the University and 500 unnamed defendants with working relationships to the University, a press release from law firms Arias Sanguinetti Wang & Torrijos and Janet, Janet and Suggs confirmed Thursday.  This brings the total to over 800 current and former students who have opted out of the $215 million class action settlement in January and who have filed lawsuits against USC and Tyndall, saying the University played a role in covering up about three decades of sexual abuse against patients at the Engemann Student Health Center.  In addition, the lawsuit turns to USC for letting Tyndall’s actions, “committed to satisfy [his] own prurient sexual desires,” continue for years while harboring knowledge of his actions by complaints from his patients.  “Despite the fact that USC has publicly admitted that it received numerous documented complaints of TYNDALL’s sexually abusive behavior dating back to at least the year 2000, and that such complaints are now known to have existed as early as the year 1988, USC actively and deliberately concealed TYNDALL’s sexual abuse of female student patients for years, continuing to grant TYNDALL unfettered sexual access to the young students in his and USC’s, care, all to protect Defendant USC’s reputation and financial coffers,” the lawsuit read.  “Throughout the litigation process involving George Tyndall, USC has been committed to resolving these lawsuits fairly,” the University wrote in a statement to the Daily Trojan Thursday. “Once the university is served with this lawsuit, it will review and respond to the allegations through the legal process.” In total, the suit includes 16 causes of action against Tyndall, USC and Does 1 through 500 — along with the request for a jury trial. center_img The lawsuit calls the defendant Tyndall “a serial sexual predator” who took advantage of his position to commit sexual abuses such as forcing patients to undress in his presence, photographing patients while they were unclothed, penetrating patients with unwashed hands and without personal protective equipment and making repeated comments that were meant to sexually harass and were racist and misogynistic in nature.  In the new lawsuit, defendants 1 through 500, along with the University, are alleged to have continually ignored complaints, deliberately concealed information to law enforcement and the Medical Board of California and contributed to “a sexually hostile environment on campus.” (Daily Trojan file photo) The Los Angeles Police Department launched a criminal investigation into Tyndall’s conduct in May 2018, leading to the L.A. County District Attorney’s office filing 29 felony counts against him, including 11 counts of sexual battery by fraud of 16 different women from 2009 to 2016. The plaintiffs, identified as Jane Does 138 to 162, have filed complaints that span almost the entirety of Tyndall’s tenure at USC, ranging from undergraduate and graduate students who attended the University from the late 1980s to 2017, a year after Tyndall was placed on leave pending an investigation into his conduct. While the LAPD’s investigation is still pending, the civil suit allows the plaintiffs to bring action against Tyndall’s misconduct and under the Tom Bane Civil Rights Act under California civil code, which prohibits discrimination, intimidation or coercion based on a protected class that threatens the individual’s enjoyment of their personal and constitutional rights. “USC paid more attention to its own financial gain and chose to protect a sexually deviant doctor instead of thousands upon thousands of women who trusted USC over the course of decades,” the press release read. “USC’s conduct empowered Tyndall to be an abusive predator for decades.”last_img read more

Report: Reina set for Napoli medical

first_imgSky Sport Italia claim Liverpool goalkeeper Pepe Reina is flying in for his Napoli medical on Wednesday.The shot-stopper has agreed to join on loan for one season and it’s reported the two clubs have already exchanged contracts.Personal terms have also been finalised, so Reina will undergo a medical on Wednesday or Thursday.He reunites with Rafa Benitez, who first signed him at Liverpool and is the new Coach of Napoli.Meanwhile, this opens the door for Morgan De Sanctis to join Roma for €0.5m.Napoli are active on the transfer market, as they are also reportedly on the verge of completing a €37m move for Real Madrid striker Gonzalo Higuain.last_img read more