Blogs

EPOS kit is in the clouds

first_imgDoncaster-based firm AlfaRichi has launched a new EPOS system for bakeries, which it believes it is the first to use ’cloud computing’ for the back office. This avoids the risk of losing service or data, as the new system replicates this information on multiple secure servers.Tills are connected via broadband to AlfaRichi servers and all sales and stock data is available in real time anywhere there is an internet connection and browser. The data is stored in ’Oracle’ databases, with detailed sales and management reports available in seconds.The firm said its solutions have been designed specifically for bakeries and feature shop ordering, stock and waste management from the tills, ingredients management, and complex promotions.last_img read more

For big questions, a bigger forum

first_imgOne of the most challenging and lauded programs at Harvard isn’t part of the academic course curriculum.Coordinated through the Freshman Dean’s Office, the “Reflecting on Your Life” initiative invites freshmen to think about meaning and purpose. Featuring facilitators from across the University, the program typically meets for three sessions, at the beginning of second semester.The sessions fulfill no academic requirements, and yet, year after year, freshmen show up for three consecutive weeks to participate in small-group programming that delves deeply into their values, leading to conversations with peers that sometimes reveal gaps between thought and action.“The program gives students time to stop and think about what really matters to them,” said Katherine Steele, project manager and director for freshman programming, such as “what their values are and how those values shape the decisions that they make — from what’s important to them to how they spend their time, and even who they spend their life with.”Now, a grant from the Teagle Foundation is broadening the scope of the program, making it possible for Harvard to share it with colleges and universities interested in launching similar initiatives. The grant will also enable collaborations on best practices and programs to help students to consider the big questions: meaning, value, and purpose.After Richard Light, the Carl H. Pforzheimer Jr. Professor of Teaching and Learning, learned about the Teagle Foundation’s initiative to advance civic and moral education on college campuses, Steele worked with Dean of Freshmen Thomas A. Dingman to submit a proposal to help develop programs for the “civic and moral education of today’s college students.”The grant will sponsor the effort for three years, helping leaders at Harvard and elsewhere understand the impact of the various ways universities encourage dialogue about personal values and citizenship. But most importantly, Steele said, the grant should help promote programs that allow students to figure out how they want to live.“How do you affect moral growth? How does someone really solidify what they stand for? It’s about developing a stronger sense of who they are, and what they stand for. It’s about drawing the lines between what’s important to you and how you’re spending your time … and if the connections between those two things are missing, what can or should you do about it?”“Reflecting on Your Life” began at Harvard as a result of the in-depth, one-on-one interviews that Light conducted each year with students about to graduate. One answer was especially provocative, that of the student who told Light that Harvard had “forgotten to offer the most important course of all” — namely, how to think about living his life.“It was a revelation to realize that we were missing out on such a key and fundamental question,” Light said. “It’s often covered in an academic sense, but not necessarily from a personal, real-life point of view. What does it mean to live a happy, or useful, life? What about living a productive life? Are those concepts inherently different? If they are, which one do you choose?”Light approached Howard Gardner, the John H. and Elisabeth A. Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education, for his perspective. Gardner, whose research has often focused on professional ethics, said that the discussion mirrored a trend he had observed among students over the years.“I’d become concerned about something I’d observed from our best and brightest,” Gardner said. “They wanted to do the right thing, but they felt like the most important thing was to be successful. So if they had to cut some corners in order to accomplish that, they felt like they needed to do so. The metaphor I like to use is that the ethical muscle was very thin.”For the past six years, according to both individual testimony and a formal evaluation, alumni of the program have left it feeling that they have a better understanding of themselves, their goals, and their values.“In the 19th century, one of the reasons you went to college was to think about values, purpose, and deep spiritual values — which was completely expunged in the 20th century,” Gardner said. Although the secularization of universities was positive in many ways, he said, a void was left.“Some students fill this with religion, science, or a strong familial unit, but for many students in today’s fast-changing world — particularly those new to college, and especially those attending a high-pressure institution, such as Harvard — they need, and deserve, our guidance and our help.”For Steele, the grant will provide an opportunity for students across a range of Schools to pause and take the time to ask themselves the hard questions.“Harvard students are so busy and so focused, but we’ve found that students really benefit from posing these challenging questions,” she said. “When we create an opportunity for them to do that, and have a structure where they can pose these questions, it can have a really profound effect.”last_img read more

Once a Belle, always a Belle

first_imgThe crowd that filed quietly into Regina Chapel on Tuesday filled the room with green – they wore bright green shirts and pinned small green ribbon to their tops. They came to remember Saint Mary’s sophomore Ziqi Zhang. Zhang, 19, who died last week from injuries sustained in an accident between her bike and an SUV outside the entrance to the College on State Route 933. Green was her favorite color. But even as they filled the chapel with green, they also filled the room with stories. During the service, faculty, staff and students from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s stood one after another and shared their memories of an international student who had been their friend. A resident of Regina Hall, Zhang was a dual-degree student majoring in mathematics at Saint Mary’s and taking engineering classes at Notre Dame. She was a resident of Jiangsu Province in China. International student Ariane Umutoni met Zhang shortly after the two arrived at Saint Mary’s. She remembered Zhang as fearless while they discovered America together. “I remember going to the beach with her in Michigan,” Umutoni said. “There were big stones. … She was like, ‘I want a picture there.’ I said, ‘That’s dangerous,’ and she said, ‘Let’s take a chance.’ I was so scared, but she wasn’t. “That was Ziqi.” Umotoni asked the Saint Mary’s community to come together as a family during a time of need and grief. “We need you,” she said. “Some of us are far from home. You cannot imagine how my family is feeling to know that they have not seen me in so long and such a thing can happen. We need each and every one here. “We’ll hold hands, mourn together, cry together, share memories and just be a family,” she said. The stories from Zhang’s friends prompted both tears and laughter during the service. Paige Edmonds was Zhang’s resident assistant during her freshman year. She joked about a resident she said was both curious and warm. “She was one of those freshman that the questions you think you’re never gonna get asked as an RA, she asked them,” Edmonds said. “She was the type of resident who when you had a section event, would come knock on my door the next day and ask where everyone was. But she definitely challenged me to grow as a person. … Remember her smile.” Saint Mary’s graduate Chen Chen recalled a story she heard about Zhang before the two had even met. A mutual friend brought Zhang to pick up the keys to her dorm room on her first day at Saint Mary’s, but when they went to open the door, they had some trouble with the lock. “Ziqi just whipped out a toolkit … and started seriously working on trying to break into her room,” Chen said. “So I got really excited, and the first thing that came to my mind, I got to tell this story to Dr. Barstis, who is the engineering advisor, to let her know that we have a student who has the right engineering spirit. … That’s basically how she got to the engineering program.” Other professors and friends recalled Zhang as constantly smiling and always willing to push her limits for new experiences. They talked about an excellent student newly fascinated by philosophy and dedicated to her studies. They remembered a girl excited to return home to China over winter break for the first time since she had left for college. Notre Dame sophomore Christine Nie said she came from the same city as Zhang in China, but only met her after they came to South Bend. She remembered feeling at home hearing Zhang speak their first language with the same distinct accent as her family members and friends in China. “I thought even though she couldn’t stay in this beautiful world, as a girl of the same age and of the same city and of similar background, I can live this life for her,” she said through tears. Elaine Meyer-Lee, director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL), read an email from Zhang’s parents to Dr. Alice Yang, director for global education. Another Chinese-speaking professor had translated the letter. “We lost our precious daughter,” they wrote. “She was our pride and joy. She longed for this wonder country of America, and we wish that she could have completed her studies, learned the sciences and humanities so that she could have played a worthy role in the betterment of the entire human race.” College President Carol Ann Mooney also wore bright green as she addressed the crowd gathered in the chapel. “Each of us has lost a sister,” Mooney said. “It is terribly difficult to lose a young person with so much talent and so much promise. Ziqi’s death leaves a hole in the Saint Mary’s community.” Zhang’s family is working to obtain passports and visas to come to the United States, Mooney said. Donations to help the family with funeral and travel expenses may be sent to Karen Johnson, vice president of Student Affairs, in 175 Le Mans Hall. Checks should be payable to Saint Mary’s College and indicate in the memo line that the donation is for the Ziqi Zhang family. “For her family, this is an unspeakable grief. … Our hearts break for her parents, her sister and her good friends and family in China,” Mooney said. Student Affairs is also collecting notes for Zhang’s family at the same address. The notes will be translated and delivered to her family when they arrive in the United States. “When they arrive on our campus, we will make every effort to let them know how valued Ziqi was, what a positive contribution to Saint Mary’s she was and that she had a home here.”last_img read more

Allardyce hits back at Senegal

first_img Sakho’s appearance for West Ham infuriated many inside the Senegal camp, with Alain Giresse’s side crashing out at the group stage following Tuesday’s defeat to Algeria. The former Metz striker came in for criticism from fans on Twitter and Giresse also questioned how Sakho could possibly have been deemed fit enough to turn out for West Ham. But Allardyce defended the decision after the win at Ashton Gate, revealing Sakho travelled by limousine instead of with the rest of the squad and insists he does not expect his top goalscorer to be banned until the end of the African Cup of Nations, as has been suggested. “I’m not worried at all he could be facing a ban whatsoever,” he said. “We’ve stuck to every rule and regulation in the book by the FA, by FIFA and by UEFA. We have not breached any rules and regulations whatsoever and I have to say I’m extremely disappointed by Senegal’s reaction. “He (Sakho) is coping fine because he has got enough to burn his bridges with, they (Senegal) are falling out with us. “If anything we should be falling out with them but we are not, we are keeping it at a very professional level, like we always do and like I said we have done everything in the rules to comply with what is happening.” Allardyce also confirmed Sakho will travel to Anfield for Saturday’s Barclays Premier League encounter against Liverpool in the same manner he made the trip to Bristol, but his compatriot Kouyate may not be available for selection against the Reds following a late return. The Hammers striker came off the bench to score the only goal in their FA Cup fourth-round victory over Bristol City on Sunday, despite having been ruled out of Senegal’s African Cup of Nations squad with a back injury. And the relationship between club and country could also be soured further after Allardyce said he had struggled to communicate with midfielder Cheikhou Kouyate about his return to east London. The midfielder had linked up with Senegal but Allardyce and West Ham had struggled to contact the former Anderlecht man and arrange his journey home – with Kouyate now expected back later on Thursday. “The other player that we had available has been difficult to find over the last 48 hours,” Allardyce continued. “We know where he is but we have had trouble finding him. If you speak to other managers in the Premier League, if they are honest like I am they will tell you the same story. “We are expecting him back today after chasing him down for the last 48 hours. He could play against Liverpool.” Allardyce played down reports linking both Sakho and fellow summer recruit Enner Valencia with a move to London rivals Chelsea and insists he will not be looking to bring in any other forwards during the January transfer window. “By email, text or phone? How have they sounded us out?,” the 60-year-old replied when asked about reported contact from Chelsea. “The only way it has been sounded out is through the media, certainly not through club to club.” “With us having Andy Carroll, Diafra Sakho, Carlton Cole and Enner Valencia we have more than enough front men to cope with the demand for the rest of the season. In the summer we’ll reassess our aims and the squad but for now we’re fine with the four options we’ve got.” Although a new striker may not be on his shopping list, Allardyce again said he would like to complete a move for Manchester United midfielder Darren Fletcher. The 30-year-old Scot has been told he can leave Old Trafford on a free transfer and Allardyce remains interested, whilst also confirming a deal is close for Hamilton full-back Stephen Hendrie – although he would not link up with West Ham until the summer. “It is still a possibility. It’s not dead yet, so it still could happen,” Allardyce said of a move for Fletcher. “You have to be patient sometimes. We’re not desperate, as we’ve got several good options in midfield but we want to add to that if we can.” Press Association Sam Allardyce has continued a bitter war of words with Senegal football officials and insists West Ham did nothing wrong in playing Diafra Sakho last weekend.last_img read more