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Once a Belle, always a Belle

first_imgThe crowd that filed quietly into Regina Chapel on Tuesday filled the room with green – they wore bright green shirts and pinned small green ribbon to their tops. They came to remember Saint Mary’s sophomore Ziqi Zhang. Zhang, 19, who died last week from injuries sustained in an accident between her bike and an SUV outside the entrance to the College on State Route 933. Green was her favorite color. But even as they filled the chapel with green, they also filled the room with stories. During the service, faculty, staff and students from Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s stood one after another and shared their memories of an international student who had been their friend. A resident of Regina Hall, Zhang was a dual-degree student majoring in mathematics at Saint Mary’s and taking engineering classes at Notre Dame. She was a resident of Jiangsu Province in China. International student Ariane Umutoni met Zhang shortly after the two arrived at Saint Mary’s. She remembered Zhang as fearless while they discovered America together. “I remember going to the beach with her in Michigan,” Umutoni said. “There were big stones. … She was like, ‘I want a picture there.’ I said, ‘That’s dangerous,’ and she said, ‘Let’s take a chance.’ I was so scared, but she wasn’t. “That was Ziqi.” Umotoni asked the Saint Mary’s community to come together as a family during a time of need and grief. “We need you,” she said. “Some of us are far from home. You cannot imagine how my family is feeling to know that they have not seen me in so long and such a thing can happen. We need each and every one here. “We’ll hold hands, mourn together, cry together, share memories and just be a family,” she said. The stories from Zhang’s friends prompted both tears and laughter during the service. Paige Edmonds was Zhang’s resident assistant during her freshman year. She joked about a resident she said was both curious and warm. “She was one of those freshman that the questions you think you’re never gonna get asked as an RA, she asked them,” Edmonds said. “She was the type of resident who when you had a section event, would come knock on my door the next day and ask where everyone was. But she definitely challenged me to grow as a person. … Remember her smile.” Saint Mary’s graduate Chen Chen recalled a story she heard about Zhang before the two had even met. A mutual friend brought Zhang to pick up the keys to her dorm room on her first day at Saint Mary’s, but when they went to open the door, they had some trouble with the lock. “Ziqi just whipped out a toolkit … and started seriously working on trying to break into her room,” Chen said. “So I got really excited, and the first thing that came to my mind, I got to tell this story to Dr. Barstis, who is the engineering advisor, to let her know that we have a student who has the right engineering spirit. … That’s basically how she got to the engineering program.” Other professors and friends recalled Zhang as constantly smiling and always willing to push her limits for new experiences. They talked about an excellent student newly fascinated by philosophy and dedicated to her studies. They remembered a girl excited to return home to China over winter break for the first time since she had left for college. Notre Dame sophomore Christine Nie said she came from the same city as Zhang in China, but only met her after they came to South Bend. She remembered feeling at home hearing Zhang speak their first language with the same distinct accent as her family members and friends in China. “I thought even though she couldn’t stay in this beautiful world, as a girl of the same age and of the same city and of similar background, I can live this life for her,” she said through tears. Elaine Meyer-Lee, director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL), read an email from Zhang’s parents to Dr. Alice Yang, director for global education. Another Chinese-speaking professor had translated the letter. “We lost our precious daughter,” they wrote. “She was our pride and joy. She longed for this wonder country of America, and we wish that she could have completed her studies, learned the sciences and humanities so that she could have played a worthy role in the betterment of the entire human race.” College President Carol Ann Mooney also wore bright green as she addressed the crowd gathered in the chapel. “Each of us has lost a sister,” Mooney said. “It is terribly difficult to lose a young person with so much talent and so much promise. Ziqi’s death leaves a hole in the Saint Mary’s community.” Zhang’s family is working to obtain passports and visas to come to the United States, Mooney said. Donations to help the family with funeral and travel expenses may be sent to Karen Johnson, vice president of Student Affairs, in 175 Le Mans Hall. Checks should be payable to Saint Mary’s College and indicate in the memo line that the donation is for the Ziqi Zhang family. “For her family, this is an unspeakable grief. … Our hearts break for her parents, her sister and her good friends and family in China,” Mooney said. Student Affairs is also collecting notes for Zhang’s family at the same address. The notes will be translated and delivered to her family when they arrive in the United States. “When they arrive on our campus, we will make every effort to let them know how valued Ziqi was, what a positive contribution to Saint Mary’s she was and that she had a home here.”last_img read more

Chile Emphasizes the Importance of Women in Peacekeeping Missions

first_imgBy Guillermo Saavedra/Diálogo January 29, 2019 Through the Joint Peacekeeping Operations Center (CECOPAC, in Spanish), the Chilean Joint Chiefs of Staff concluded 2018 with a course addressing the role of women in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping missions. The international course Women, Peace, and Security: Gender Integration in Peacekeeping Operations was conducted December 3-7, at CECOPAC in Santiago, Chile. Forty-five units from security and armed forces of the region, including representatives of Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, El Salvador, the United States, and Uruguay, took part in the course. Participants learned about gender issues, cultural diversity, human rights, and negotiation, among other topics. The objective of the activity was to share basic and fundamental knowledge on gender perspectives in peacekeeping missions to provide the proper tools and skills to the personnel deployed in these operations. The course also emphasized the role of peacekeeping personnel as protectors of the most vulnerable members of the population—women and children. “In the last two years, this has been a particularly relevant issue for us,” Chilean Navy Captain Marco Villegas Zanón, CECOPAC director, told Diálogo. “Basically, the course’s purpose and focus is to prepare monitors in these fields.” Troop requirement The course was conducted as part of the Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI), a program of the U.S. Department of State that seeks to reinforce partner nations’ capabilities in the execution of peacekeeping operations. CECOPAC conducted the third edition of the course with the support of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) through the Security Cooperation Office at the U.S. Embassy in Chile. “U.S. involvement is present in all areas,” said Capt. Villegas. “Professors come from the United States; they’re involved in the coordination of activities and program design, logistics, and the possibility of bringing foreign students to the country.” The course is the result of a partnership among GPOI, SOUTHCOM, the U.S. Navy’s Naval Postgraduate School, and CECOPAC that dates back to 2013. The activity also supports UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security, and is a requirement for troops that deploy in peacekeeping operations. “[Resolution 1325] extends the traditional concept of security to include more citizens, especially women and people who weren’t traditionally considered part of the security structure that a country was supposed to provide,” said Guillermo Holzmann, a Chilean defense and international affairs analyst. “It suggests who should provide those conditions, and who should be the participants, and this is where it advises on the inclusion of women […], in humanitarian situations requiring security conditions that will be much more efficient and effective when the gender perspective is addressed.” Better prepared The course was taught in a conference format, with several modules distributed over the course of five days. Activities included lectures on concepts of organizational change, stress management, and intercultural communication, among others. “The course addresses a full range of risks, from marginalization of women to sexual and gender-based violence,” Alex Concepción, GPOI assistant program manager at SOUTHCOM, told Diálogo. “We take the perspective that peacekeepers who understand the risks to women develop intervention skills and apply those skills to realistic scenarios. They are better prepared to act morally and effectively when they encounter a genuine threat in a conflict situation.” According to Concepción, CECOPAC played an important role throughout the initiative and demonstrated its regional leadership in preparing security and armed forces on women’s empowerment issues. He added that Chile showed great interest in helping regional countries to deploy in peacekeeping missions. “At a regional level, Chile is very progressive in these areas,” Concepción said. “Chile was the first country in Latin America to create and develop a National Action Plan for Women, Security, and Peace, which has inspired other countries in the region, [such as] El Salvador and Paraguay, to work on their own plan.” “I would like to emphasize the opportunity that the GPOI initiative gives us to teach these topics to national and foreign personnel,” Capt. Villegas concluded. “Also, [I want to emphasize] the fact that we can contribute to training people throughout Latin America.” The course was first taught in Uruguay, in 2015. It was carried out twice more in 2018, in Peru in May and in Chile in December. CECOPAC plans to conduct the same course in El Salvador in 2019.last_img read more

Why credit unions should not decline Facebook authorizations

first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Some credit unions are declining authorization for Facebook payments due to the relatively high number of fraud cases being reported for that merchant category code. But declining these authorizations may have unintended negative consequences on your members. Here’s why.Facebook launched in mid-2015 the ability for its users to send other Facebook users money through the Facebook Messenger app. The source of the money transfer comes from a debit card, and receipt of the money goes to the recipient’s account through his or her debit card (meaning each side of the transactions needs to enroll a debit card with Facebook). As a bonus, iPhone users can add touch ID (fingerprint scan) as an added layer of security. Facebook claims that person-to-person (P2P) payments are wrapped in secure layers and use encrypted connections. Facebook points to its history of processing over 1 million payment transactions per day for game players and advertisers since 2007.While the actual transactions may be secure, Facebook’s P2P is still subject to fraud. Facebook scams have been featured on nightly news. Phishing attacks claiming that someone has sent money, and to click here to get your cash, have been documented by KnowBe4.com, an employee Security Awareness Training program. Account takeover is another threat, according to RSA Security, since Facebook and Messenger use the same login, leaving fraudsters who gain access to a Facebook page the ability to gain access to an enrolled debit card and drain the victim’s bank account (up to the daily limit). An even more nefarious fraud scam involves using Facebook to set up brand-new accounts, connect them to stolen debit cards, and then transfer the money. continue reading »last_img read more

Max Verstappen replaces demoted Daniil Kvyat at Red Bull

first_imgRed Bull has demoted Russian driver Daniil Kvyat and replaced him with Max Verstappen for the rest of the Formula One season, starting from next week’s Spanish Grand Prix.The 18-year-old Verstappen’s promotion from feeder team Toro Rosso comes after Kvyat twice barged into Sebastian Vettel’s car in Sunday’s Russian Gran Prix, knocking him out of the race on the first lap.”Max has proven to be an outstanding young talent. His performance at Toro Rosso has been impressive so far and we are pleased to give him the opportunity to drive for Red Bull Racing,” Red Bull team principal Christian Horner said in a statement. “We are in the unique position to have all four drivers across Red Bull Racing and Toro Rosso under long term contracts with Red Bull, so we have the flexibility to move them between the two teams.”Kvyat was also involved in another incident with Vettel at the Chinese GP and his demotion to Toro Rosso – where he drove in the 2014 season – appears to be a reprimand. Vettel spoke with Horner, his team principal when Vettel and Red Bull won four straight drivers’ and constructors’ championships from 2010-13, moments after being shunted off the track at Sochi.”(Kvyat) will be able to continue his development at Toro Rosso, in a team that he is familiar with, giving him the chance to regain his form and show his potential,” Horner said.But it is a big blow to the 22-year-old Kvyat, who was signed to replace Vettel when he left Red Bull to join Ferrari last year.advertisementKvyat finished a commendable seventh last year, = one place ahead of his more illustrious teammate, Daniel Ricciardo, and this season secured an impressive third place at the Chinese GP.But while his talent and his speed are not in doubt, his abrasive, highly risky style of driving has caught the headlines more than his driving.Vettel confronted him angrily after the Chinese GP, where Vettel collided with his Ferrari team-mate Kimi Raikkonen after Kvyat tried an aggressive overtaking move on the first corner.Kvyat did not apologize to Vettel, although he did after the Russian GP incident.Verstappen, the youngest driver to make his debut in F1 last season, is touted as a future star of the sport and is under contract until the end of 2017, with Mercedes and Ferrari both reportedly keen on signing him.last_img read more

Etihad possible Perth plans

first_imgSource = e-Travel Blackboard: D.M The possibility of Etihad Airways flying ex Perth is ‘on the radar’ according to the airline’s National Sales Manager, advising CEO James Hogan had discussed probability of operations in a recent meeting.National Sales Manager, Industry, Wayne Borland, speaking at the recent Travelscene NCC conference stated that with recent expansions to its extensive global network, and with new code share flights from Australia, Perth was “still on the list”.As the world’s fastest growing commercial airline, Mr Borland said the company expected to double its size by 2020 with 150 aircraft.“It’s remarkable to see what we’ve achieved in 7 years.  We currently have 70 aircraft in fleet, 100 on firm order and 105 options to convert within the next 10 years,” Mr Borland said.Etihad has also been inducted into the growing Quantum programme, allowing Travelscene members to now earn reward points when selling airfares.“As a preferred supplier, we are very happy with how the relationship is developing and the people who are representing your interest and bringing it back to us – from our end it makes a difference because we’re seeing results,” Mr Borland said, speaking of the airline’s relationship with Travelscene.last_img read more